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Physicians

NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 150 physicians affiliated with Abington Memorial Hospital met there Wednesday and decried its plan to stop performing abortions as part of a partnership with nearby Holy Redeemer Health System, according to doctors at the meeting. With growing community outcry over the proposed merger, the physicians' disapproval may be enough to undermine it, or at least prompt a reappraisal of the terms, some doctors believe. Joel Polin, Abington's chair of obstetrics and gynecology, said that the hospital's situation was changing "hour by hour" and that high-level internal meetings took place Wednesday afternoon.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012
Doylestown Hospital announced that president and chief executive officer Richard A. Reif plans to retire by the end of 2012 after more than 23 years in the job. Board of Directors chairwoman Carolyn Della-Rodolfa said the board accepted Reif's resignation "with heartfelt appreciation of his leadership and warmest wishes for his future. " A search firm was retained to seek Reif's successor. — David Sell
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1970s, Dr. Mary Hansen would learn ahead of time what soap opera fans across the nation would have hungered to know — what was up next on All My Children and One Life to Live. "She was a close personal friend of Agnes Nixon," the Main Line creator and script writer of both daytime shows, Dr. Hansen's daughter, Barbara Carper, said. "Agnes would send her the scripts and she would read through them and verify their medical accuracy. " It was not a staff position, but, Carper said, "it was a fun thing, fun for me to brag about it. " Her mother "was very quiet, very reserved," Carper said.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | Freelance
Cas­par Wis­tar was once one of the pre­mier physicians in Phila­del­phia. Born in the city in 1761, Wis­tar was the son of Richard and Sa­rah Wyatt Wis­tar, a Quak­er fam­i­ly. As a teen­ag­er, Wis­tar assisted the wound­ed from the Bat­tle of Germantown in 1777, and this ex­pe­ri­ence re­port­ed­ly inspired him to go into med­i­cine. He studied at the University of Penn­syl­van­ia and the University of Edin­burgh, Scot­land, and received his doc­tor­ate in 1786.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Stacey Burling
Is it still necessary to use kittens to teach pediatric medical residents how to insert breathing tubes into tiny babies? Doctors at Albert Einstein Medical Center say yes. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine thinks not. The Washington-based nonprofit group, which says it has 10,000 physician members, said this week that it plans to file a complaint about the practice against Einstein on Thursday. The complaint is to be filed with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's animal care office in Raleigh, N.C. The group contends that practicing on kittens violates the Animal Welfare Act because training programs can use simulators that are just as effective.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Anna Melnichuk, Associated Press
KIEV, Ukraine - Ukraine's jailed and ailing former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko tentatively agreed Friday to have her back condition treated at a local hospital under the supervision of a German doctor. Tymoshenko lawyer Serhiy Vlasenko said the treatment of Tymoshenko's herniated disc will start Tuesday at a hospital in the eastern city of Kharkiv, where she is jailed. He said she will give her final approval after meeting with her attorneys next week. Karl Max Einhaeupl, a doctor with Berlin's Charite clinic, who arrived to examine Tymoshenko, said his colleague will observe the treatment.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Pennsylvania's new natural gas law, which takes effect Saturday, was being debated, the focus was on high-profile issues such as the new impact fee. But just before it passed, medical provisions were added that now have some physicians worried it will compromise public health. Except in an emergency, a physician who needs proprietary information about chemicals used in natural gas drilling to assess a patient must provide "a written statement" to a company, according to the act, and must sign a confidentiality agreement.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Dr. Joseph L. Hayes, 84, of Springfield, Delaware County, an emergency-room physician, died of complications of pneumonia Friday, April 6, at home. After graduating from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1961, Dr. Hayes completed an internship at Cherry Hill Hospital. He then had a general medicine practice in Havertown. In 1969, he became an emergency-room physician at Tri-County Hospital, now Springfield Hospital. Dr. Hayes helped train many students, interns, and residents, his children said.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
WHAT ARE they afraid of? That's the obvious question that arises from yet another move by the fracking industry, and their BFFs in Pennsylvania government, to keep secret ("proprietary," if you will) the toxic chemicals that they are injecting into the earth. Act 13, the hydraulic fracturing law passed in February, already qualified as a major corporate giveaway to the natural-gas industry, giving companies the right to overturn local zoning laws and pretty much drill anywhere.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael D. Stulpin, 59, of Newtown Square, a family physician in Sharon Hill for more than 30 years, died Tuesday, Feb. 7, of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Since 1981, Dr. Stulpin had maintained a practice in Sharon Hill. "One of his greatest sources of pride was his personal and medical relationships with multiple generations of his patient families," said his wife, Anne Gettemuller Stulpin. Dr. Stulpin was an assistant medical director with Devon Health Services.
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