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NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Vail Rhoads, 86, an internist and an active Philadelphia-area Quaker, died Tuesday, Jan. 27, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Foulkeways at Gwynedd. Dr. Rhoads, of Chestnut Hill, was a graduate of Westtown School, Stanford University, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He served an internship at Pennsylvania Hospital. He completed a three-year fellowship in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and received his master's degree in internal medicine from the University of Minnesota in 1960.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. Clements Jr., 83, a family physician from Devon, died Friday, Jan. 16, of complications from Parkinson's disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital, where he had spent much of his life tending patients. A Main Line native, Dr. Clements was a graduate of the Haverford School, Wesleyan University, and Jefferson Medical College. In 1960, he joined the U.S. Public Health Service and was assigned to the Mescalero Apache Reservation in south-central New Mexico. He and his wife, Nancy Muth Clements, had many happy times living and working with the Native Americans in a beautiful mountain setting, his family said.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Levine stood tall in the doorway, offered a polite handshake, and took a seat at the L-shaped desk in her drab, blank slate of an office. The room, with its empty bookshelves, dual computer screens, and not much else, seemed appropriately open to possibility as the headquarters for a woman about to chart new territory. Levine, who has just been named Pennsylvania's physician general, spent most of her 57 years - at least outwardly - as a man. If the state Senate confirms her appointment, the doctor, who until a few years ago was known as Richard Levine, will become one of the nation's very few, openly transgender people in public office.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying a priority is to expand Medicaid to hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians, Gov.-elect Tom Wolf on Saturday named two cabinet members with experience expanding coverage under President Obama's Affordable Care Act. Wolf reached south of the border to tap Theodore "Ted" Dallas, currently the secretary of the Maryland Department of Human Resources, to be his secretary of human services. The agency serves the most vulnerable by providing cash aid, home-heating help and health care for the poor, foster care and adoption services, child abuse protection, and support for the aging and people with intellectual disabilities.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Clayton Kyle, 90, formerly of Chestnut Hill, a Philadelphia endocrinologist who specialized in treating diabetes, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, of complications from a subdural hematoma at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Kyle spent his entire career at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and served as the chairman of its medical board from 1977 until 1979. He rose to the level of clinical associate professor of medicine. Dr. Kyle's work centered on controlling the negative effects of diabetes.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard A. Steiner, 73, of Moorestown, who retired in the late 1990s as an Army osteopathic physician, died of complications from pancreatic cancer on Sunday, Dec. 7, at his home. Until earlier this year, Dr. Steiner was a physician at the Concentra Medical Center in Pennsauken, his son, Christopher, said. Born in Philadelphia, Dr. Steiner graduated from Father Judge High School, and earned bachelor's degrees in accounting and biology at La Salle University, and a doctorate in osteopathy at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley H. Lorber, 97, formerly of Philadelphia, longtime team physician for the 76ers and a noted gastroenterologist at Temple University School of Medicine, died Monday, Nov. 24, of heart failure at Good Samaritan Medical Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. Born in New York City, he moved to Philadelphia with his family as a child. As an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Lorber was a scholar-athlete, excelling in football and lacrosse. He received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and served as an Army flight surgeon during World War II. He remained devoted to Penn throughout his life, and later became a major fund-raiser.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN THE LATE '50s, Stanley H. Lorber, a distinguished Philadelphia physician and a basketball fan, paid a call on Eddie Gottlieb, then the owner of the Philadelphia Warriors. Lorber felt that the Warriors needed a team physician. Gottlieb agreed, and Dr. Lorber became the first team doctor in the NBA. Those were the days of "Jumpin' Joe" Fulks and Paul Arizin, and later the legendary Wilt Chamberlain, who scored his unbeatable 100 points in a game on March 2, 1962, the Warriors' last season in Philly before moving to San Francisco.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jay A. Desjardins, 84, formerly of Havertown, a retired internist, died of pneumonia Sunday, Nov. 23, at Barclay Friends in West Chester. Dr. Desjardins practiced internal medicine for 35 years in Havertown, and was an attending physician at Fitzgerald Mercy, Riddle Memorial, and Delaware County Memorial Hospitals. His family said he was a respected doctor at a time when diagnostic imaging and laboratory studies were unavailable, and when health care was very personal.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Mel Kohn is at the intersection of the governmental, nonprofit, and corporate efforts directed at the Ebola crisis in West Africa. Kohn, who lives in Philadelphia, works for Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County. He joined Merck Vaccines after 14 years of work in public health for the State of Oregon. With the drugmaker's office of corporate philanthropy funding the trip, he and Merck colleague John Grabenstein visited Sierra Leone in October as part of a group put together by the Virginia-based nonprofit Project HOPE and invited by the Sierra Leone government.
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