FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Brody, 83, of Haverford, professor of physics emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, Aug. 11, of complications from Parkinson's disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Brody taught physics at the University of Pennsylvania from 1959 until 2000, when he retired. He was interested in the science of sports and, in particular, the physics of tennis. The notion that tennis could be deconstructed from a physics point of view, to help players gain insight and added skill, attracted attention and turned Dr. Brody into one of the sport's leading voices.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
On Canaan's Side by Sebastian Barry (Viking, $24.95) The lyrical, award-winning novelist depicts Depression-era America through the eyes of Lilly Bere, a political refugee from Ireland. (Sept. 6) Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women by Melissa V. Harris-Perry (Yale, $28) The author, a professor of political science at Tulane University, explores how black women negotiate the many images society throws at them. The personal really is the political - and vice versa.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The visionary architect Lebbeus Woods wonders what would happen if buildings and cities sought to embody the "ethereal energies and exotic matter" of modern physics rather than "comfortable ruminations in the past. " He believes it is reassuring - but wrong - that architecture reflects the primitive, mechanical common sense codified in ancient times by Euclid and Aristotle, rather than the altogether more enigmatic world that has been revealed by a couple of centuries of progress in physics.
NEWS
November 8, 2011
Norman Ramsey, 96, who shared the 1989 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into atomic energy levels that led to the creation of the atomic clock and MRI machines, died Friday at a nursing home in Wayland, Mass., his wife, Ellie, said Monday. Mr. Ramsey was an emeritus professor of physics at Harvard University. In his autobiography for the Nobel Prize - which he shared with Hans Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul - he wrote that he was inspired by failure in molecular beam magnetic resonance experiments in the late 1940s to invent a new technique of measuring the frequency of radiation from atoms using two electromagnetic fields.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
Students in Rosalind Echols' physics class at the Science Leadership Academy think about what they're learning even when they're not in school, like when they're playing soccer, or taking SEPTA. "While I'm running on the soccer field, I'm thinking about whether I'm accelerating in my speed, or whether I'm in constant velocity," said Ashley Melendez, 17, a junior at the Center City magnet school. Echols' students think about physics on SEPTA trains, buses and trolleys because she uses her students' travels to help them understand Isaac Newton's Laws of Motion.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In contrast to Proof's and Copenhagen's more high-minded dramatic forays into abstruse reaches of math and physics, Schr?dinger's Girlfriend insists there's an element of the farcical in the subatomic particle. But for all its offbeat iconoclasm, Matthew Wells' comedy takes a quantum leap to nowhere in particular. Wells deserves credit for having the titans of 20th-century physics step off their pedestals to show that beautiful minds can also be prey to lusting hearts. Instead of awed canonizations, we have Werner Heisenberg popping up to reinforce his uncertainty principle by insisting he's not really present on the stage of the Act II Playhouse in Ambler.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world of physics was rocked mightily last week with the announcement that a new force may exist in the universe. If experiments show that the new force - known as hypercharge - does exists, the findings could have far-reaching implications on everything from the birth of the universe to black holes to attempts by physicists to link all of the known forces into one overall "grand unified theory. " The new theory challenges Galileo's observation in the early 17th century that all objects fall to earth at the same speed.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Pumpkins were flying through the air outside Conestoga High School as students watched anxiously. Only one pumpkin didn't survive, and its remains were splattered below the bleachers at Teamer Field. The event, held recently, was the second annual pumpkin flop held by the Physics I class. "The object was to get the students to construct a container or a device which will slow down the pumpkin's fall," said physics teacher Kathleen Conn. "The students were given rule sheets and several weeks to design their containers/devices.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 21st century - you know, the one where technology is supposed to rule - could end up looking an awful lot like the 19th in Wyoming, where the state university is considering a plan to eliminate its physics programs. That would make Wyoming's the only state university system in the country not to offer a physics degree. This in a state that already ranks dead last, behind all the other states and Puerto Rico, in technology-related jobs - for many of which physics is a prerequisite.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Brody, 83, of Haverford, professor of physics emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, Aug. 11, of complications from Parkinson's disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Brody taught physics at the University of Pennsylvania from 1959 until 2000, when he retired. He was interested in the science of sports and, in particular, the physics of tennis. The notion that tennis could be deconstructed from a physics point of view, to help players gain insight and added skill, attracted attention and turned Dr. Brody into one of the sport's leading voices.
NEWS
July 31, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My wife is a big woman (not fat). She's an athlete and quite strong. We both enjoy wrestling. We are evenly matched and do it often. Many times she'll pin me down with me on my back, shoulders to the ground. Other times, I do the same to her. The loser takes the winner out to dinner. We enjoy it greatly. Are we crazy? Are we weird? And most of all, are we alone in this activity? - Happy Husband in Florida DEAR HAPPY HUSBAND: As long as no one gets hurt, what two consenting adults do is their business.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Susan Snyder, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
The chairman of Temple University's physics department lost his leadership post Friday, one day after federal authorities accused him of illegally sharing sensitive U.S. technology with entities in China. Xiaoxing Xi, a naturalized U.S. citizen, however, would remain on the faculty, officials said. The case against Xi, who was charged with four counts of wire fraud, left colleagues, researchers, and former students perplexed and wondering how the professor they knew as a leading luminary in the field of superconductor research had ended up the latest target in the government's efforts to stanch the theft of trade secrets by China and Chinese businesses.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Temple University said Friday that Xiaoxing Xi has been temporarily suspended as chair of Temple University's physics department, pending the outcome of federal charges that he schemed to provide sensitive U.S. defense technology to China. "The concern is this certainly will affect his ability to do administrative duties," Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai said. No decision has been made on whether he will be permitted to teach in the fall if the case has not been resolved, Dai said.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
THE CHAIRMAN of Temple University's physics department, a world-renowned expert in a complex field that most people know nothing about, has been indicted for fraudulently obtaining key technology to help associates in his native People's Republic of China. Xiaoxing Xi, 47, of Penn Valley, is a whiz in the field of superconductivity, the ability of something to allow electricity to flow through it easily - especially at very low temperatures - which can boost the performance and efficiency of certain technology like MRI machines.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you get right down to it, it was a question of physics. At the site of the Amtrak derailment on Tuesday, the track had a fairly significant curve. Imagine a giant circle with a diameter of nearly 2,900 feet, more than a half-mile. The track's path would trace the outline of that circle. The track also had a "superelevation" of five inches, meaning the outer rail was five inches higher than the inner rail. Given those parameters, a locomotive pulling seven Amtrak-size cars could safely travel up to about 55 m.p.h., said Pennsylvania State University engineer Steve Dillen, who performed a rough calculation at The Inquirer's request.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The concentrated heat radiating from your laptop. The sudden roar of the cooling fan from inside your desktop computer. Familiar signs of wasted energy, caused largely by the increasing numbers of transistors crammed into the innards of our electronic gadgets. As you reach once again for that charging cable, be aware that an amiable pair of University of Pennsylvania physicists may have hit on the beginnings of a solution: a new kind of material called topological insulators.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Joe Eisele, it wasn't just about making plays. It also was about making amends. "I was definitely determined," Eisele said after leading St. Augustine Prep to an 11-6 victory over Shawnee on Thursday morning in a clash of the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in The Inquirer's South Jersey Top 10 rankings. Eisele, a senior attack and Delaware recruit, scored four goals and added two assists as St. Augustine Prep emerged with the upper hand in a physical battle between fierce rivals in unseasonably harsh conditions.
SPORTS
April 2, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miles Austin revamped his warm-up regimen before last season to shake the "injury-prone" label that now follows the 30-year-old receiver to the Eagles. Austin played the first 11 games of 2014 for the Cleveland Browns without major problems with his hamstring, which forced him to miss 11 games in his final three seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. Then, he suffered a lacerated kidney in the 12th game, ending his season and bringing him onto the free-agent market after another unfinished campaign.
SPORTS
April 1, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
LIKE THE NFL'S endangered extra point, physicals given to players to make signings and trades official tend to be almost automatic. That might not be the case when Eagles doctors give wideout Miles Austin the once-over, though. Austin, who turns 31 in June, last played a full NFL season in 2012 and has a chronic hamstring problem. The NFL Network's Ian Rapoport reported yesterday that the Birds have signed Austin to a 1-year deal worth $2.3 million, with another $700,000 possible in incentives.
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