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Physics

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NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred K. Mann was known to the public for his decorated career in particle physics, and to his family members as a student of history and literature who quoted Cicero at the dinner table. More than a decade after retiring from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Mann, who died Sunday, Jan. 13, at age 92, added another line to his resumé: protester. In 2003, Dr. Mann helped organize a campaign against the proposed closure of an 8,000-foot-deep South Dakota gold mine that was seen as an ideal site to measure the subatomic particles called neutrinos.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
On Canaan's Side by Sebastian Barry (Viking, $24.95) The lyrical, award-winning novelist depicts Depression-era America through the eyes of Lilly Bere, a political refugee from Ireland. (Sept. 6) Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women by Melissa V. Harris-Perry (Yale, $28) The author, a professor of political science at Tulane University, explores how black women negotiate the many images society throws at them. The personal really is the political - and vice versa.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The visionary architect Lebbeus Woods wonders what would happen if buildings and cities sought to embody the "ethereal energies and exotic matter" of modern physics rather than "comfortable ruminations in the past. " He believes it is reassuring - but wrong - that architecture reflects the primitive, mechanical common sense codified in ancient times by Euclid and Aristotle, rather than the altogether more enigmatic world that has been revealed by a couple of centuries of progress in physics.
NEWS
November 8, 2011
Norman Ramsey, 96, who shared the 1989 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into atomic energy levels that led to the creation of the atomic clock and MRI machines, died Friday at a nursing home in Wayland, Mass., his wife, Ellie, said Monday. Mr. Ramsey was an emeritus professor of physics at Harvard University. In his autobiography for the Nobel Prize - which he shared with Hans Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul - he wrote that he was inspired by failure in molecular beam magnetic resonance experiments in the late 1940s to invent a new technique of measuring the frequency of radiation from atoms using two electromagnetic fields.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
Students in Rosalind Echols' physics class at the Science Leadership Academy think about what they're learning even when they're not in school, like when they're playing soccer, or taking SEPTA. "While I'm running on the soccer field, I'm thinking about whether I'm accelerating in my speed, or whether I'm in constant velocity," said Ashley Melendez, 17, a junior at the Center City magnet school. Echols' students think about physics on SEPTA trains, buses and trolleys because she uses her students' travels to help them understand Isaac Newton's Laws of Motion.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In contrast to Proof's and Copenhagen's more high-minded dramatic forays into abstruse reaches of math and physics, Schr?dinger's Girlfriend insists there's an element of the farcical in the subatomic particle. But for all its offbeat iconoclasm, Matthew Wells' comedy takes a quantum leap to nowhere in particular. Wells deserves credit for having the titans of 20th-century physics step off their pedestals to show that beautiful minds can also be prey to lusting hearts. Instead of awed canonizations, we have Werner Heisenberg popping up to reinforce his uncertainty principle by insisting he's not really present on the stage of the Act II Playhouse in Ambler.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world of physics was rocked mightily last week with the announcement that a new force may exist in the universe. If experiments show that the new force - known as hypercharge - does exists, the findings could have far-reaching implications on everything from the birth of the universe to black holes to attempts by physicists to link all of the known forces into one overall "grand unified theory. " The new theory challenges Galileo's observation in the early 17th century that all objects fall to earth at the same speed.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Pumpkins were flying through the air outside Conestoga High School as students watched anxiously. Only one pumpkin didn't survive, and its remains were splattered below the bleachers at Teamer Field. The event, held recently, was the second annual pumpkin flop held by the Physics I class. "The object was to get the students to construct a container or a device which will slow down the pumpkin's fall," said physics teacher Kathleen Conn. "The students were given rule sheets and several weeks to design their containers/devices.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 21st century - you know, the one where technology is supposed to rule - could end up looking an awful lot like the 19th in Wyoming, where the state university is considering a plan to eliminate its physics programs. That would make Wyoming's the only state university system in the country not to offer a physics degree. This in a state that already ranks dead last, behind all the other states and Puerto Rico, in technology-related jobs - for many of which physics is a prerequisite.
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SPORTS
August 19, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
PITTSBURGH - After the Eagles had five takeaways in their 17-9 preseason win over the Tampa Bay Bucs last week, somebody asked defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz whether he puts particular emphasis on forcing turnovers. "Well, you can emphasize it all you want," he said. "You can do drills all you want. But you've got to have players (who can force turnovers). Standing up and giving a speech or putting a PowerPoint up or making an emphasis in a drill doesn't get it done on the field.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
As a Philadelphia firefighter, Steven Mesete often is required to spring into action at a moment's notice, abruptly sending his heart into rat-a-tat mode. "You can be sitting still, and then running at 100 miles an hour," he said. One day last week, Mesete ramped up his cardiovascular system in a much more controlled fashion, walking on a treadmill with wires stuck to his chest and a cardiologist standing nearby. The 41-year-old firefighter with Engine 49 in South Philadelphia was among the first in the 2,200-member department to undergo what is now a mandatory physical exam every two years.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
An Iraq War veteran in York County, Pa., has filed a federal lawsuit claiming she was denied a type of physical therapy because she has HIV. The 40-year-old woman, whose suit was filed under the pseudonym Bonnie Jones, said she sought help from OSS Orthopaedic Hospital in York for chronic spine pain and limited range of motion. She said the pain resulted from wearing a bulletproof vest for an extended period. Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, which operates physical therapy services at the hospital, and Timothy Burch, a physical therapist, also were named in the suit, filed by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, For The Inquirer
The Servant of Two Masters (1746) by Carlo Goldoni is an enduring theater favorite, but I doubt many revivals stand up to the energetic panache of the show now running at Hedgerow Theatre. Jared Reed excels as the servant Truffaldino, who latches on to two masters, then spends the night fighting to keep them separate. Truffaldino expands in stature, but in the early going has only the modest ambition of getting one good meal out of the deal. Servant is commedia dell'arte, and all the usual elements are there -- wily menials, venial old men, frustrated young lovers, cross-dressing, mistaken identities, props with almost magical power, purloined letters, physical humor, and lots of wordplay.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Niger Ali is writing a script for a kids' TV show. About physics. "The basis of everything," the Freedom Prep High School freshman explains, "is physics. " Ali, 14, has a chance to write, produce, and host the show of his dreams because of the Institute for Development of Education in the Arts, or IDEA. The nonprofit organization offers classes in the 130-seat "black box" theater complex - "we call it the IDEA Performing Arts Center," president Cynthia Primas says - at the BB&T Pavilion on the Camden waterfront.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
The Temple physics professor whose life was turned upside down when the U.S. government filed and later withdrew espionage charges against him has been notified that the government will not refile the charges. "The U.S. Attorney's Office has notified Professor [Xiaoxing] Xi's defense team that there will be no new charges and that the government will return his seized property," said Michael A. Schwartz, one of Xi's lawyers. Whether the government might recharge Xi had been an open question since September, when prosecutors withdrew the existing charges "without prejudice," meaning that they could be revived.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
Paul Halpern is a University of the Sciences physics professor and the author of "Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics" At its best, Twitter can offer the kind of creative connections and sharing of ideas that would have been nearly impossible decades ago. It can link individuals with parallel or complementary interests, and offer them the chance to enrich each...
NEWS
March 17, 2016
By B.G. Kelley Among those who believe in redemption and resurrection, Easter time resonates spiritually more than any other time of the year. Yet it also resonates physically, for the two are not mutually exclusive. The connection is resoundingly made in the redemptive suffering and pain of Jesus carrying and enduring the cross. It is a triumphant connection. I became convinced of the intrinsic spirit and value of this link when I was a teenager. I became assured that the physical-spiritual journey takes a shape as particular as a snowflake, making a difference from the departure point to the end. And it is not a lucky drift.
SPORTS
March 11, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
RODNEY McLEOD was asked what makes him a good fit for Eagles coordinator Jim Schwartz's defense. "Just my physicality," McLeod said in his introductory news conference Thursday, after he signed on for five years and $37 million. "I'm able to just be fearless out there, honestly, even though, my size, you know a lot of people wouldn't say I'm that big (at 5-10, 195). " McLeod, who has played in every game since he arrived in St. Louis as an undrafted free agent out of Virginia in 2012, and has started 48 games in a row at safety, said one of the reasons he took the Eagles' offer was that he wants to play alongside and learn from Malcolm Jenkins.
SPORTS
March 10, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
There was a moment in the second quarter when Maddie Sims was face down on the floor, motionless near mid-court. The physicality of a bitter rivalry - burning since Sims was in middle school - had boiled over. That was hardly surprising. Sims had collided with an opposing player in a way that might have - OK, would have - seemed out of line in any other game. But not this game: "That's just what this game is about," Sims said. Getting knocked down, Lenape coach Rob Hummel preached afterward, was inevitable.
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