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Physics Teacher

NEWS
January 31, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 17, Janet Song, a senior at Montgomery County's Methacton High School, already has helped develop a test that she hopes can be used to detect cancer. Song, who lives in Audubon, has a patent application pending on the process and her name on a science journal article about it. This week, Song added to her list of honors: She was named one of only 40 national finalists in the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search. The top winners will be named in March; all finalists get at least a $5,000 grant and a laptop.
NEWS
January 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Kaczmarczik, 86, of Huntingdon Valley, a physics teacher at Drexel University for 37 years, died of coronary artery disease Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Kaczmarczik grew up near Seventh and Brown Streets in the Northern Liberties section of the city. He was president of his graduating class at Central High School, his son Paul M. said, and earned his bachelor's degree in physics from Drexel in 1948 and his master's in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1952.
NEWS
August 3, 2007 | By Erika Gebel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The task was immense. Several 10-foot-long springs swung from the room's second-story balcony. On the dangling end of each hung a 500-gram weight. A swarm of physics teachers hustled about, calculating elastic forces and measuring displacements with meter sticks. Their goal was to drop this weight from a carefully determined height so that it would just kiss an egg on the ground. If the egg broke . . . well, wrong answer. But if the egg remained intact, they could brag about having mastered a new kind of physics lesson.
NEWS
August 3, 2007 | By Erika Gebel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The task was immense. Several 10-foot-long springs swung from the room's second-story balcony. On the dangling end of each hung a 500-gram weight. A swarm of physics teachers hustled about, calculating elastic forces and measuring displacements with meter sticks. Their goal was to drop this weight from a carefully determined height so that it would just kiss an egg on the ground. If the egg broke . . . well, wrong answer. But if the egg remained intact, they could brag about having mastered a new kind of physics lesson.
NEWS
September 6, 2006 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today should be a regular first day of school for the 21,000 students who attend Catholic high schools in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Although contract talks went down to the wire, lay instructors who teach at the 20 archdiocesan high schools approved yesterday afternoon a two-year contract that includes salary raises in both years and a slight increase in the teachers' share of health-care premiums. "We have a contract!" Rita Schwartz, the longtime president of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers, announced after members ratified the pact by a vote of 528-300.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alfie Kohn, a no-holds-barred critic of grading and ranking children, came to high-performing Lower Merion High School, but not to praise its top-tier scores on state tests and SATs. Kohn came to lambaste the federal education policy known as the No Child Left Behind Act, as well as standardized testing across the country, including Pennsylvania's PSSAs. And he came to rally an audience of about 200 teachers, administrators and parents from the suburbs and the city to rise up in rebellion against the tests.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three local teachers are among the 12 finalists for the 2003 Pennsylvania teacher of the year award. The finalists from Bucks County are Susan DeMeglio, who teaches first and second grade at Penn Valley Elementary School in the Pennsbury School District, and Shirley Kelly, a learning-support teacher at William Tennent High School in the Centennial School District. From Montgomery County, Carol Rohrbach, an English teacher at Springfield Township High School in the Springfield Township School District, was named a finalist.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Bucks County is seeking adult volunteers for its student-mentoring program, which recently expanded to the Central Bucks School District. In Montgomery County, Big Brothers/Big Sisters needs volunteers for its fast-growing program, which was in nine schools in the fall and now serves children at 27 schools. Adults, 19 and older, are asked to meet individually with elementary or middle school students during school hours. The commitment is an hour every other week in Bucks and an hour every week in Montgomery County.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Daryl Taylor will pretty much do anything to get his students to share his passion for the laws of science. The physics teacher at Williamstown High School has been known to lie down on a bed of nails to show students that pressure is reduced when a force is spread over a large area. To drive his point home on all of Newton's Three Laws of Motion, he has the principal come in and smash a cinder block on his chest with a sledgehammer. He doesn't get hurt because the inertia of the block resists the blow, which is too quick to exert a large enough force to do any damage.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tim Clarke, who has taught physics at Moorestown Friends School since 1995, has been named an outstanding high school physics teacher by American University. Clarke was one of 20 teachers nationwide honored by the university's physics department from more than 300 responses received to a survey distributed to students at the university. He was nominated by Greg Rollins, a Shamong resident who graduated from Moorestown Friends in 1998 and who is now a sophomore at the Washington, D.C., school.
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