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NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
As jobs go, there's not much to recommend it. The work is hard, there's no glory, and the risk of disaster is high. Regarding any levity, only the paycheck might draw a laugh. And yet, page-turners are classical music's anonymous heroes. In some performances, a smart music reader with quick reflexes and intuition for nailing just the right moment for turning the page can be the difference between a performance fraught with gremlins and one that soars. Page-turners are the air-traffic controllers of music, says Miles Cohen, artistic director of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, perhaps the area's most frequent professional employer of page-turners.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Vladimir "Billy" Sokoloff, pianist and senior member of the Curtis Institute faculty, died yesterday morning after a long illness. He was 84. Dr. Sokoloff was known for his artistry as a chamber music player. At the Curtis, he taught many hundreds the finer points of musical partnership. Beginning in his student days, he had partnered with the greats - violinist Efrem Zimbalist, soprano Marcella Sembrich, violist William Primrose and cellist Emanuel Feuermann He counted Philadelphia Orchestra principals as colleagues and chamber partners, including flutist William Kincaid and oboist Marcel Tabuteau.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Don't look for Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes at tonight's Philadelphia Orchestra concert at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. Due to illness, he canceled his Thursday-through-Saturday concerts, where he was to perform Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 2. Efforts were made to replace him with the 20-year-old Chinese pianist Yundi Li, who couldn't be released from concert commitments in Paris. However, the Philadelphia Orchestra is close to confirming what will be Li's U.S. orchestral debut, for July 2003 at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to Peter Cincotti, the wunderkind who played Penn's Annenberg Hall with his quartet Saturday night, the biggest question is this: Can we believe the hype? The answer: Yes and no. The easy answer would be to say that Cincotti is everything we've been led to believe by the latter-day Tin Pan Alley publicity machine. Yes, he is, as a musician, mature beyond his years. He is a maddeningly exacting pianist, a true pro and craftsman who has mastered the styles of those who preceded him. As a vocalist, he is far less seasoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1994 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Soprano Benita Valente and pianist Cynthia Raim have been performing Spanish programs on tour, and they extracted four unusual samples from their repertoire for a recital Sunday at the Convention Center. The songs were from Cancionero de Pedrell by Roberto Gerhard, the Swiss- born composer who studied in Barcelona and pulled on Catalonian identity like a sweater. Three of the songs were in Catalan; one was in Spanish, and all featured the composer's approach of enlarging rhythms as the songs develop.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
A lot of hype surrounded pianist Sandrine Erdely-Sayo's American premiere of Juan-Carlos Sedero's Lyrical Suite on Sunday at the Ethical Society. Most of it was unjustified. The French-born Erdely-Sayo, who in 1990 came to Philadelphia to study at the University of the Arts, was one of several pianists who received the Argentine composer's seven-section score. The taped performance she sent back to the composer so impressed him that he chose her to give the world premiere last summer in France.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In classical music, where a strong-willed personality is an asset, students don't always resemble their teachers in any discernible way. But in the case of Cecile Licad, the apple didn't fall very far from the tree. Licad's recital Sunday clearly revealed the influence of one of her three teachers at the Curtis Institute of Music, Rudolf Serkin. (Mieczyslaw Horszowski and Seymour Lipkin were the other two). Serkin's presence was especially apparent in Mozart's Fantasia (K. 475)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Traditions thrive in Philadelphia, traditions such as the Academy Morning Musicales, a series created in 1905 by the enterprising members of the West Philadelphia Women's Committee of the Philadelphia Orchestra. At 93, it's still flourishing. Yesterday, a piano recital by Rieko Aizawa brought the 1997-98 series to a close. A capacity crowd demonstrated palpable enthusiasm. The pianist, a Curtis grad, is 23. She recently made her New York debut and soon heads for the St. Louis Symphony for a concerto.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestral color was everything in the early years of this century, and the French - or French-inspired - came from the subtlest palettes. That was the message of the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Wednesday at the Mann Music Center. Artistic director Charles Dutoit has made this final week of the season an essay on French orchestral invention and influence, and in his concert Wednesday shaped what was one of the most interesting programs of the season. With Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha as soloist, Dutoit made half a concert from Turina's Rhapsodia sinfonica and Falla's Noches en los jardines de Espana, and completed the essay by playing all of Ravel's Daphnis et Chloe ballet.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
The extraordinary Roman pianist Fermo Roscigno drew repeated bravos from a capacity crowd at the Ethical Society last night. Roscigno, in his first Philadelphia appearance, was sponsored by the Consulate General of Italy and the America-Italy Society of Philadelphia. A dull-looking, all-19th-century program came to vivid life at his hands, starting with an unpromising Clementi sonata. Listeners sat up right away: Clementi, it seemed, was a better composer than we thought. As his Op. 26, No. 2 proceeded, it became clear that Roscino's strong dynamic contrasts and boldly outlined phrases had much to do with Clementi's unwonted shine.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 13, 2016
The South Jersey Jazz Society is bringing an impressive lineup of local and national jazz artists to Somers Point and Ocean City this weekend. Many of the acts playing this year's Cape Bank Jazz @ The Point Festival look back at the music's storied history, with a few torch-bearing younger artists who are carrying on the tradition. Below are a few sets not to be missed; events are at the Sandi Pointe Coastal Bistro, 908 Shore Rd., Somers Point, unless otherwise noted. Andreas Varady Quartet: Hungarian guitar prodigy Varady is only 17 but already has an impressive list of accomplishments to his name.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1): Famed pianist Hélène Grimaud joins conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra for the beloved Brahms Piano Concert No. 2 . The second half of the program will be Schumann's Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") .
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
As jobs go, there's not much to recommend it. The work is hard, there's no glory, and the risk of disaster is high. Regarding any levity, only the paycheck might draw a laugh. And yet, page-turners are classical music's anonymous heroes. In some performances, a smart music reader with quick reflexes and intuition for nailing just the right moment for turning the page can be the difference between a performance fraught with gremlins and one that soars. Page-turners are the air-traffic controllers of music, says Miles Cohen, artistic director of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, perhaps the area's most frequent professional employer of page-turners.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
In solo recitals, players tend to memorize their parts, so page-turners are a moot point. In an orchestra, where parts are only a few pages long, players can photocopy, cut, and tape parts to avoid awkward page turns. When there are two musicians to a stand, one turns the page while the other continues playing.But in pieces like Elgar's thickly textured 40-minute Piano Quintet , played by the Takács Quartet and pianist Garrick Ohlsson not long ago at the Perelman Theater, the part is long, and the pianist is often in the middle of a line when the page runs out. And so the present writer lent a hand.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
Concert with benefits. Tri-County Concerts in Rosemont has been presenting up-and-coming classical performers for some 75 years. It will hold a benefit concert at 7 p.m. next Sunday with artists who have most definitely arrived. Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, the acclaimed French pianist, heads a lineup that includes flutist Mimi Stillman, violinist Xiao-Fu Zhou, cellist Isaiah Kim and pianists Charles Abramovic, Natalie Zhu, and Matthew Bengtson. Tickets are $30 at the Rotwitt Theater in Rosemont College, 1400 Montgomery Ave. in Rosemont.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Even the intermediate piano student could play through the first 30 seconds of Schubert's Piano Sonata in B Major, D. 575 and hear that something crazy is going on. It wasn't just Schubert. There are any number of ways one could map in a single program the strangely precarious state of traditional harmony, but none more deliciously subversive than the route Paul Lewis chose Thursday night. The English pianist's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital debut at the Perelman looked harmless on paper - Schubert, Brahms, and Liszt.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Mapping a Musical Partnership. Pianist Maurizio Pollini and conductor Claudio Abbado began performing together in the 1960s, an association that lasted five decades. DG has packaged eight discs' worth of music taken from recordings released between the 1970s and late '90s - all five Beethoven concertos, the two of Brahms, Schumann, plus works of Bartók, Schoenberg, and Luigi Nono. What's captured in Pollini & Abbado: The Complete Deutsche Grammophon Recordings is variable. The Schumann concerto might have more revealing interpreters than Pollini.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The pianist arrives as the food court clock strikes noon. A jazz man at heart, the pianist exudes class. In his sweater vest and tie, Mark Randall sits down at his Baldwin, his sweet, battered Baldwin, nestled among the marble tables and plastic ferns, under the neon lights of the China Pagoda restaurant and the Hair Express salon. He begins to play. A standard, always. Porter. Gershwin. Jimmy Dorsey, perhaps. Some barely notice Randall as they pass through the old Lit Bros.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Samuel "Sam" Dockery, a pianist whose performances and recordings with prominent musicians made him an icon of Philadelphia's jazz scene, died Dec. 23 at the Burlington Woods health-care facility in Burlington, N.J., from Alzheimer's disease. He was 86. Mr. Dockery, who spent most of his life in and around Philadelphia, worked steadily from the 1950s through the 1990s, playing on dozens of albums and touring with such nationally recognized artists as Buddy Rich and Betty Carter. He played hard bop, a subgenre of jazz that incorporates influences from rhythm and blues as well as gospel music.
NEWS
December 21, 2015
More than a box set, Vladimir Horowitz: The Unreleased Live Recordings 1966-1983 is closer to being its own musical planet, full of familiar yet strange creatures who adhere to no laws but their own. Of course, there's really only one creature, pianist Horowitz, a musician who truly lived up to the word legendary , though not necessarily because he was infallibly great. The 50-CD set ($149.52 on Amazon), originally recorded by Columbia (now Sony) and RCA, comes from a time when recording machines were ever-present at the live concerts he gave, recordings that were distilled down to an LP or two a year, with the rest left unheard by the public.
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