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NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Vladimir "Billy" Sokoloff, pianist and senior member of the Curtis Institute faculty, died yesterday morning after a long illness. He was 84. Dr. Sokoloff was known for his artistry as a chamber music player. At the Curtis, he taught many hundreds the finer points of musical partnership. Beginning in his student days, he had partnered with the greats - violinist Efrem Zimbalist, soprano Marcella Sembrich, violist William Primrose and cellist Emanuel Feuermann He counted Philadelphia Orchestra principals as colleagues and chamber partners, including flutist William Kincaid and oboist Marcel Tabuteau.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Don't look for Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes at tonight's Philadelphia Orchestra concert at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. Due to illness, he canceled his Thursday-through-Saturday concerts, where he was to perform Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 2. Efforts were made to replace him with the 20-year-old Chinese pianist Yundi Li, who couldn't be released from concert commitments in Paris. However, the Philadelphia Orchestra is close to confirming what will be Li's U.S. orchestral debut, for July 2003 at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to Peter Cincotti, the wunderkind who played Penn's Annenberg Hall with his quartet Saturday night, the biggest question is this: Can we believe the hype? The answer: Yes and no. The easy answer would be to say that Cincotti is everything we've been led to believe by the latter-day Tin Pan Alley publicity machine. Yes, he is, as a musician, mature beyond his years. He is a maddeningly exacting pianist, a true pro and craftsman who has mastered the styles of those who preceded him. As a vocalist, he is far less seasoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1994 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Soprano Benita Valente and pianist Cynthia Raim have been performing Spanish programs on tour, and they extracted four unusual samples from their repertoire for a recital Sunday at the Convention Center. The songs were from Cancionero de Pedrell by Roberto Gerhard, the Swiss- born composer who studied in Barcelona and pulled on Catalonian identity like a sweater. Three of the songs were in Catalan; one was in Spanish, and all featured the composer's approach of enlarging rhythms as the songs develop.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
A lot of hype surrounded pianist Sandrine Erdely-Sayo's American premiere of Juan-Carlos Sedero's Lyrical Suite on Sunday at the Ethical Society. Most of it was unjustified. The French-born Erdely-Sayo, who in 1990 came to Philadelphia to study at the University of the Arts, was one of several pianists who received the Argentine composer's seven-section score. The taped performance she sent back to the composer so impressed him that he chose her to give the world premiere last summer in France.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In classical music, where a strong-willed personality is an asset, students don't always resemble their teachers in any discernible way. But in the case of Cecile Licad, the apple didn't fall very far from the tree. Licad's recital Sunday clearly revealed the influence of one of her three teachers at the Curtis Institute of Music, Rudolf Serkin. (Mieczyslaw Horszowski and Seymour Lipkin were the other two). Serkin's presence was especially apparent in Mozart's Fantasia (K. 475)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Traditions thrive in Philadelphia, traditions such as the Academy Morning Musicales, a series created in 1905 by the enterprising members of the West Philadelphia Women's Committee of the Philadelphia Orchestra. At 93, it's still flourishing. Yesterday, a piano recital by Rieko Aizawa brought the 1997-98 series to a close. A capacity crowd demonstrated palpable enthusiasm. The pianist, a Curtis grad, is 23. She recently made her New York debut and soon heads for the St. Louis Symphony for a concerto.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestral color was everything in the early years of this century, and the French - or French-inspired - came from the subtlest palettes. That was the message of the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Wednesday at the Mann Music Center. Artistic director Charles Dutoit has made this final week of the season an essay on French orchestral invention and influence, and in his concert Wednesday shaped what was one of the most interesting programs of the season. With Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha as soloist, Dutoit made half a concert from Turina's Rhapsodia sinfonica and Falla's Noches en los jardines de Espana, and completed the essay by playing all of Ravel's Daphnis et Chloe ballet.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
The extraordinary Roman pianist Fermo Roscigno drew repeated bravos from a capacity crowd at the Ethical Society last night. Roscigno, in his first Philadelphia appearance, was sponsored by the Consulate General of Italy and the America-Italy Society of Philadelphia. A dull-looking, all-19th-century program came to vivid life at his hands, starting with an unpromising Clementi sonata. Listeners sat up right away: Clementi, it seemed, was a better composer than we thought. As his Op. 26, No. 2 proceeded, it became clear that Roscino's strong dynamic contrasts and boldly outlined phrases had much to do with Clementi's unwonted shine.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Violinist Pamela Frank and her father, pianist Claude Frank, substantially changed their program last night, and in doing so, reminded their listeners of how easily some major works have slipped out of hearing. They performed at the Port of History Museum, and dropped scheduled sonatas by Mozart, Debussy and Brahms in favor of Brahms' lyric Sonata in G (Op. 78) and Beethoven's Sonata in C minor (Op. 30, No. 2). Both works are less obvious in their appeal, but taken together, complemented and compounded the impact they made as comparative rarities, and created a setting in which the Schubert Fantasia in C (D.934)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Classical once spread the word in a setting largely unknown as a musical venue to listeners today: Home. Many a first outing with Beethoven's symphonies came in the form of four-hand piano transcriptions played by amateurs in the living room. There was a critical social aspect to such gatherings. They were, to use the current argot, about sharing, liking, and friending. Sunday afternoon's final Philadelphia Young Pianists' Academy (PYPA) concert of the summer brought some of this repertoire into the Curtis Institute's Field Concert Hall, and it didn't stop at four hands.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
A paradox, perhaps, but it's a significant marker of individualism that every time Alexandre Moutouzkine appears, he sounds like a slightly different pianist. The basic character of his playing morphed even in a single recital, Thursday night, part of the Philadelphia Young Pianists' Academy (PYPA). Many listeners came to know Moutouzkine through his affiliation with Astral Artists, for which he devised in 2011 an unusually inventive live transcription of Stravinsky's The Firebird as the sound track to the animated short Who Stole the Mona Lisa?
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evelyn Burtis Cramer, 96, an elementary schoolteacher in Burlington County from 1950 to 1975, died Wednesday, July 29, at the Evergreens, the retirement community in Moorestown where she had lived since 1999. Born in Mount Holly, Mrs. Cramer grew up on a 125-acre dairy farm. She graduated in 1935 from Pemberton High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1939, and later a master's, both in education, at what is now the College of New Jersey. "She taught first grade, mostly," over the years at schools in Mount Laurel, Pemberton Township, and Southampton, her son, Charles, said.
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Czech pianist Ivan Moravec, 84, died Monday in a Prague hospital after having been treated for pneumonia for several weeks, his New York agent said. Born in Prague and especially loved for his Mozart, Chopin, Debussy, and Brahms interpretations, Mr. Moravec made his London debut in 1959, and his American debut in 1964 with the Cleveland Orchestra and George Szell. His recordings - especially those of Chopin and Debussy - remain prized by collectors. One frequent stop on his American calendar was Philadelphia, where he was heard both as a recitalist with the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society and in concertos with the Philadelphia Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Anyone who knows jazz in Philadelphia knows Wendy Simon. Throughout the 1980s and '90s - whether as a soloist, paired with local-legendary pianist Eric Spiegel in Tuxedo Junction, or with Mark Shaw's society orchestra - the singer was renowned for her low, delectable voice, her innovative scat-singing, and her delicate way with a ballad. "My vocal range changed, though, and I'm actually singing higher," says Simon, "which is unusual because most singers lower the keys of their songs as they age. What I love most that's changed with age is having the confidence of my experience and the courage to continue to strive to go beyond my self-imposed limitations in all aspects of my life, as well as my art. " Some of those experiences kept her off the stage for 18 years, a spell happily broken when she returns to live singing this weekend at Paris Bistro, with the accompaniment of the Tom Adams Trio.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Muriel Boushell Graham, 90, formerly of Pennsauken, a pianist for Haddonfield Plays and Players productions in the 1970s and 1980s, died at her home in Simpsonville, S.C., on Wednesday, March 4. A memorial service has been set for 11 a.m. Saturday, June 13, at St. Peter's Church, 1 Hartford Rd., Medford. Mrs. Graham was known most recently as the pianist at Inn Philadelphia, a piano bar on Camac Street between Spruce and Locust Streets in Center City, where she worked from the late 1990s to 2005, when she moved to South Carolina, daughter Michelle Dilger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When you walk into a museum and find that your favorite Schieles and Munchs have all been rearranged to a particular configuration, you might wonder what the point is. Pianist Shai Wosner was a musical curator Friday night, but an inscrutable one, never explaining why he assembled the first half of his stunningly beautiful Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital debut by interspersing Schubert impromptus with Chopin impromptus. Do they share more than a name? Actually, it was a gift that Wosner was mum about motivation, giving his American Philosophical Society listeners license for imagination, and before long, you wondered whether the point wasn't about these two composers but a triangulation to a third.
NEWS
May 4, 2015
Shelby Lynne I Can't Imagine (Rounder ***) Shelby Lynne was already a veteran when she won the Best New Artist Grammy for 1999's I Am Shelby Lynne. But the deserved acclaim for that album, which last year was reissued in a deluxe edition, did not translate into long-term mainstream success, and Lynne has settled into a career as an outsider. I Can't Imagine, her 13th album (not including a Christmas collection), is another in a string of earthy, forceful roots records.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The artistic solidity on which Richard Goode made his name has given way to encroaching adventurousness over the years, though the limitations of that were intermittently apparent at his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Tuesday at the Kimmel Center. The program was a typical Goode cross section: Unjustly neglected Mozart ( Adagio in B minor ), the core repertoire of Beethoven's Piano Sonata in F-sharp major Op. 78 , ongoing explorations of Debussy, and a relatively new acquaintance with Schumann's Humoreske . Though the Beethoven seemed a little tired in this outing, Debussy's Children's Corner showed what has made Goode an eminent pianist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Both sets by Vijay Iyer at Swarthmore College's Lang Performing Arts Center on Saturday started the same way: the pianist rang gentle, chiming tones, establishing a mood of quiet contemplation and close listening. From there, the two halves of the evening went in completely different directions. The first, featuring Iyer as part the trio Tirtha, combined Indian classical music with Western jazz harmonies and rock-infused electric guitar; the second showcased the telepathic adventurousness of Iyer's long-running ensemble.
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