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NEWS
May 6, 2003 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If, Sunday afternoon and evening at the Independence Seaport Museum, any member of the Beethoven sonata mini-marathon audience had been told that six pianists were up on stage, no ears would have doubted it. In fact, only two hands were at work, and it's a good thing they were attached to Anton Kuerti. The Canadian pianist delivered a feat: five late Beethoven piano sonatas in two Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concerts, taking the famously crazy "Hammerklavier" sonata last.
NEWS
October 17, 2006 | By Diana Burgwyn FOR THE INQUIRER
There's still a spirited dialogue over whether Johann Sebastian Bach's harpsichord concertos are best played on that instrument, accompanied by a small ensemble of "authentic" stringed instruments (the purist view exemplified by Trevor Pinnock), or, at the other extreme, on the piano with a modern orchestra in the style of Glenn Gould. The fact is, both approaches are valid if well conceived and performed. In its concert Sunday at Trinity Center for Urban Life, Astral Artistic Services featured the Lithuanian pianist Andrius Zlabys playing four of the eight exceedingly demanding Bach concertos for single harpsichord.
NEWS
January 13, 2003 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
Playing a program of works for left hand alone, pianist Gary Graffman made some musical history at the Perelman Theater on Friday while he challenged his audience to find his handicap any hindrance to broad-ranging musical satisfaction. His muscles may have failed his right hand in 1979, but his determination to be a complete pianist has stimulated extraordinary eloquence and dazzling virtuosity in his playing. Concerto appearances and chamber music are more frequent, but a full recital is a rarity.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Raul Sunico's recital yesterday at the Ethical Society revealed a pianist more attentive to music's showier attributes than to its subtleties. Even before he played a note, the tired program gave a clue: Schumann (Fantasiestucke, Op. 12), Ravel (Gaspard de la Nuit) and Rachmaninoff (Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor). These are pieces with which it is easy to show off; these are also composers whose gifts do not need any further championing unless by an interpreter of finesse and imagination.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
With his cunning wisps of dance tunes and church harmonies, Schubert gives even the mildly astute performer an easy way into his music. But Imogen Cooper doesn't have the kind of mind that lends itself to the easy way in, or out. The London pianist, in Wednesday night's all-Schubert recital at the Perelman Theater, introduced an air of struggle and vulnerability that went far beyond the usual highlighting of abrupt mood swings, major-minor ambiguity, and...
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Bulgarian-born French pianist Alexis Weissenberg, 82, whose love of music saved him and his mother from a World War II concentration camp and carried him to performances with Herbert von Karajan and Leonard Bernstein, has died. Bulgaria's Ministry of Culture on Monday confirmed the death of Mr. Weissenberg, who was born into a Jewish family in the capital, Sofia, but spent most of his life abroad and became a French citizen. An only child, Mr. Weissenberg recalled sharing "musical joys" learning piano and listening to recordings and concerts with his mother, before studying piano with a famous Bulgarian composer, Pancho Vladigerov.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Paul Smith, 91, a jazz pianist who accompanied many top singers and who provided the sensitive touch and rhythmic spark behind many of Ella Fitzgerald's most acclaimed performances, died June 29 at a hospital in Torrance, Calif., of heart ailments, said his publicist, Alan Eichler. Mr. Smith, whose career lasted more than 70 years, worked with two of the biggest musical acts of the 1940s, the Andrews Sisters and the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, before settling in Hollywood, where he performed on the sound tracks of hundreds of films and television shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
The highlight of a busy week for live jazz is tonight's 8:30 performance by pianist Sumi Tonooka at the Philadelphia Ethical Society, 1906 S. Rittenhouse Square. This will be native Philadelphian Tonooka's first local concert with her trio (featuring bassist Rufus Reid and drummer Akira Tana) since the release of her excellent debut album, With an Open Heart (Radiant). The album alerts the rest of the country to something that we in Philadelphia have known for some time - that Tonooka is among the brightest young soloists in jazz.
NEWS
November 12, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Simmons, 63, a Philadelphia jazz pianist known as a quintessential accompanist, died Friday, Nov. 5, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of cardiac arrest after surgery. Known as Sid, Mr. Simmons was a pianist at three of the city's major jazz clubs. He was in the house band at the former Ortlieb's Jazzhaus in Northern Liberties and a frequent sideman at Chris' Jazz Cafe on Sansom Street just west of Broad Street and at the former Zanzibar Blue in the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra adds another to the many firsts in its 94-year history with tonight's Martin Luther King Jr. tribute concert: the first pianist with dreadlocks to bring his own bench. The guest is Awadagin (pronounced Ah-wah-DAH-juhn) Pratt, who will play the evergreen Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 at the Academy of Music at 8 tonight ($8-$45; 215-893-1999). Pratt grew up in Normal, Ill., but that's not the word to describe his career. The personable, articulate pianist pursued journalism (in the local paper)
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