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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
The Eaken Piano Trio brought two fascinating yet incomplete works to the Fleisher Art Memorial yesterday afternoon. The first, a movement from Rebecca Clarke's Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano, we can only hope was a kind of tease for another concert - when the musicians will play the entire work. The second, by Philadelphia composer Margaret Garwood, was commissioned last year by the trio and has yet to be finished. For the first two movements of her Hommages, Garwood chose to pay tribute to composers Olivier Messiaen and Alberto Ginastera.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 47), known as the Kreutzer sonata, a looming presence in the Highlands Duo repertoire, was the peak at the end of the trail at a recital on Saturday at the Germantown branch of the Settlement Music School. The violinist and pianist, however, made their most dramatic musical statements earlier. Violinist Kate Ransom and pianist Anthony Sirianni billed the concert as a Carnegie Hall preview. Their debut is set for Feb. 4. Ransom and Sirianni met in 1984 at the Highlands Chamber Music Festival in North Carolina (hence the name)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tori Amos is a lucky woman. Many talented pop singer-songwriters and pianists never work with a band or producer who can assist in creating an album as dynamic and chilling as Amos' Little Earthquakes (Atlantic), released last year. Amos also found a director capable of producing a music video that grabbed four nominations at this year's MTV awards. Tuesday's concert at the Keswick Theater in Glenside, the first of two sold-out nights that featured only Amos and her piano, made it evident how important those people were in launching her career.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
After a tender, Chet Baker-influenced reading of "Where or When" in which his ruminative vocals were supported by appropriately shaded piano chords, Harry Connick Jr. told Sunday's near-capacity crowd at the Academy of Music that he didn't fully consider the song's lyric until his 38th attempt to record it for the When Harry Met Sally . . . soundtrack. This may have seemed an endearing confession to the majority of the crowd, which was wild about 22-year-old Harry - his Armani suit, his suave patter, his Sinatra affectations, his piano theatrics, his boyish New Orleans charm.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
JAVON JACKSON QUARTET. Blue Moon Jazz Cafe and Restaurant, The Bourse Building, 4th Street between Market and Chestnut. 7:30 and 10 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $20. Info: 215-413-2272. As the tide of young neo-traditional jazz saxophonists ebbs, those left ashore face a problem: How to grow musically, yet be unique among the dozens of sax players out there. Javon Jackson is at this stage, and the 30-year-old with the unadorned style has selected a piano-less quartet as the vehicle with which to experiment.
NEWS
October 14, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though not rare, Christoph Eschenbach's returns to the keyboard - his first career - are infrequent and special occasions indeed. On piano, he practices his art under circumstances more circumscribed than when conducting, and with a bristling brinksmanship inherent to challenging repertoire prepared in an inevitably limited time between conducting assignments. The young Eschenbach triumphed with intimidating repertoire, but the pianist-turned-conductor took on a piece that was in some ways as difficult on Sunday in a Philadelphia Orchestra Chamber Music concert.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Violinists - but few others - know the Camille Saint Saens Sonata No. 1 in D minor (Op. 75) - a handsome structure, whose flamboyance is supported by technical terrors. Jascha Heifetz made it one of his many signature pieces, and his interpretation is as good a reason as any that it is so seldom heard on the concert stage. After his Olympian perfectionism, who would dare? Cho-Liang Lin dared Thursday night at the Port of History Museum during a duo recital with pianist Andre-Michel Schub presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Danilo Perez makes his own opportunities. Playing Thursday evening at the Meiji-En restaurant, the pianist surprised his audience by adding an extra beat to the five-note, two-measure clave rhythm at the heart of most Afro-Latin music. Such heresy! Compositions that use 5/4 time signatures are more common in Bulgaria than Latin America. But Perez, who employed the device on "The Voyage," sees that fifth beat as a way to create even more permutations in his rhythmic explorations.
NEWS
April 24, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Beginning with three sales today, auctions over the next few days will offer rich opportunities to bid on dolls, glassware, Bucks County arts and crafts, and a miniature piano that once belonged to comedian Jimmy Durante. The piano, a so-called Tom Thumb, will be offered by Bonnie Brae Auction at one of today's sales, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the gallery on Route 724 in Spring City. It originally was in Palumbo's, the South Philadelphia restaurant that once was as famous as Durante himself until it was destroyed by fire a decade ago. Auctioneer Dana Knowlton expects it to sell for $4,500 on account of its provenance.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Lou Stein played piano in Billy Krechmer's house band for six or eight months bridging the years 1940-1941. He was 18 or 19 at the time and full of the urgent priorities of youth. He was a hard swinger in the rhythmic sense, long on intuition and flexibility, very insightful about the music of the day. Now, from the far reaches of nearly five decades, Lou Stein considers his fleeting apprenticeship in Krechmer's claustrophobic gin mill at 1627 Ranstead St. a period of great value to his musical development.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If John Harbison ever entertained the thought of joining the current march away from dissonance, he's showing no signs of it. Happily, Harbison is firm in a musical language that perches, entrancingly, at a point just dissonant enough - at least according to the two premieres Sunday night by Network for New Music. Prefacing each new work with a much earlier one filled out important context. The MIT professor, at 75, has a musical style as concentrated as ever. The concert at the Curtis Institute's Gould Rehearsal Hall came at the end of a Harbison residency that included a Friday concert dabbling in jazz.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The timing could not have been predicted or contrived. Just as Russian/American relations veer toward breakdown over the annexation of Crimea, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society presented a concert of Sergei Prokofiev's three so-called War Sonatas - Nos. 6-8, Opp 82-84 - a surprisingly overt reaction to Stalin's purges of the 1940s, played by a pianist with a certain family history of Russian persecution, Ignat Solzhenitsyn. Whatever the influence of current events on Solzhenitsyn's performance Thursday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, the impact on the audience was immeasurable.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | CHICAGO TRIBUNE
SHOPPING FOR a piano can be incredibly overwhelming because the range of prices for a new one can be anywhere from $2,500 all the way up to $2 million. Add in used pianos, and the price range expands. There are also thousands of brands, and if you don't know what to listen for, you may think every piano (regardless of price and brand) sounds the same. "It's kind of like shopping for anything," said Pierre Julia, owner of Pierre's Fine Pianos, based in Los Angeles. "The range of quality goes from made-in-China to hand-built in Europe.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonidas Kavakos is a marvel of exactitude. There's a Leonardo da Vinci-like quality to his playing, as if you could plot mathematically how every micro move accounts for his elegance and efficiency. In this extraordinary violinist, artist and master technician coexist in polished communion. If a listener Tuesday night had to strain a bit to hear that which is human, it was understandable. In his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center of four Beethoven sonatas, Kavakos was sometimes a cool customer.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weekends for Joseph A. Gorman were not spent sleeping in, not 50 years ago. On Saturday mornings, "he wakes up, vocalizing," before heading off to sing at Gloucester City church weddings, his son Joseph A. Jr. said. Later on Saturdays, he is playing the piano and singing at Kenny's restaurant on Market Street in Camden. "On Sunday mornings, he plays for Mass" as the volunteer organist and choir director at St. Mary's Church in Gloucester City. "That was the routine," his son said.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Gordon Lipton, 81, of Penn Valley, former owner of Two by Four Antiques & Collectibles, died Saturday, Jan. 11, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Arbor Terrace at Chestnut Hill. Mrs. Lipton was one of a few Philadelphia-area women who owned small businesses in the 1960s. She also was a wife, mother, teacher, musician, painter, dancer, jewelry maker, and volunteer. "She had an energetic, independent spirit," her daughter Amy said. "She was a great role model for us, as women growing up in the latter 20th century, that you could be a wife and mother and still have a career.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
N. Harry Gartzman, 94, of Philadelphia, a family physician who spent 23 years as chief physician for Camden schools, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Kennedy University Hospital-Cherry Hill. Music provided the theme to his life, with him asking for piano lessons at age 8 and playing at a saloon in Camden by 14. Graduating from Camden High School as valedictorian in 1937, Dr. Gartzman played parties to pay his tuition at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he received his bachelor's degree in 1941.
REAL_ESTATE
December 15, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Back in 1978, newlyweds Kathy and George Sideris didn't start married life in a cute, little cottage or apartment. Instead, they lived for two years in an expanded suite at the former Landmark Hotel in Maple Shade, where George was involved in operating the property. "It was a little strange, but we got used to it," explains Kathy, noting that the couple even had a small kitchen, which helped maintain some semblance of home life. But moving into a more conventional home was definitely a priority, and the Siderises got lucky: In Medford, they found a Tudor home that the builder of the surrounding cluster of custom homes had intended to occupy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WE'VE SEEN some odd court cases in Philadelphia - newspaper owners suing each other, for instance - but we've never heard of anything like the case going on in Girona, Spain. There, Sonia Bosom (imagine all the times she was called a "tithead" as a child) sued her upstairs neighbors and their daughter for noise pollution. The daughter, Laia Martin , isn't some kid banging a drum all day - she's a professional concert pianist. Crazier yet, prosecutor Emma Ruiz wants Martin to serve jail time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
FORT WORTH, Texas - The Kimbell Art Museum, designed by Philadelphia's Louis Kahn in 1972, may be better known today for its building than for its collection - and its collection is pretty breathtaking, thick with the likes of Michelangelo and Caravaggio. Scholars consider the Kimbell to be Kahn's masterpiece and one of the great museums of the 20th Century. If you've only seen photos of the exterior, a series of travertine vaults that some Texas wags have likened to a cow barn, it may be hard to appreciate the fuss.
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