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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
The Eaken Piano Trio brought two fascinating yet incomplete works to the Fleisher Art Memorial yesterday afternoon. The first, a movement from Rebecca Clarke's Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano, we can only hope was a kind of tease for another concert - when the musicians will play the entire work. The second, by Philadelphia composer Margaret Garwood, was commissioned last year by the trio and has yet to be finished. For the first two movements of her Hommages, Garwood chose to pay tribute to composers Olivier Messiaen and Alberto Ginastera.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 47), known as the Kreutzer sonata, a looming presence in the Highlands Duo repertoire, was the peak at the end of the trail at a recital on Saturday at the Germantown branch of the Settlement Music School. The violinist and pianist, however, made their most dramatic musical statements earlier. Violinist Kate Ransom and pianist Anthony Sirianni billed the concert as a Carnegie Hall preview. Their debut is set for Feb. 4. Ransom and Sirianni met in 1984 at the Highlands Chamber Music Festival in North Carolina (hence the name)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tori Amos is a lucky woman. Many talented pop singer-songwriters and pianists never work with a band or producer who can assist in creating an album as dynamic and chilling as Amos' Little Earthquakes (Atlantic), released last year. Amos also found a director capable of producing a music video that grabbed four nominations at this year's MTV awards. Tuesday's concert at the Keswick Theater in Glenside, the first of two sold-out nights that featured only Amos and her piano, made it evident how important those people were in launching her career.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
After a tender, Chet Baker-influenced reading of "Where or When" in which his ruminative vocals were supported by appropriately shaded piano chords, Harry Connick Jr. told Sunday's near-capacity crowd at the Academy of Music that he didn't fully consider the song's lyric until his 38th attempt to record it for the When Harry Met Sally . . . soundtrack. This may have seemed an endearing confession to the majority of the crowd, which was wild about 22-year-old Harry - his Armani suit, his suave patter, his Sinatra affectations, his piano theatrics, his boyish New Orleans charm.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
JAVON JACKSON QUARTET. Blue Moon Jazz Cafe and Restaurant, The Bourse Building, 4th Street between Market and Chestnut. 7:30 and 10 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $20. Info: 215-413-2272. As the tide of young neo-traditional jazz saxophonists ebbs, those left ashore face a problem: How to grow musically, yet be unique among the dozens of sax players out there. Javon Jackson is at this stage, and the 30-year-old with the unadorned style has selected a piano-less quartet as the vehicle with which to experiment.
NEWS
October 14, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though not rare, Christoph Eschenbach's returns to the keyboard - his first career - are infrequent and special occasions indeed. On piano, he practices his art under circumstances more circumscribed than when conducting, and with a bristling brinksmanship inherent to challenging repertoire prepared in an inevitably limited time between conducting assignments. The young Eschenbach triumphed with intimidating repertoire, but the pianist-turned-conductor took on a piece that was in some ways as difficult on Sunday in a Philadelphia Orchestra Chamber Music concert.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Violinists - but few others - know the Camille Saint Saens Sonata No. 1 in D minor (Op. 75) - a handsome structure, whose flamboyance is supported by technical terrors. Jascha Heifetz made it one of his many signature pieces, and his interpretation is as good a reason as any that it is so seldom heard on the concert stage. After his Olympian perfectionism, who would dare? Cho-Liang Lin dared Thursday night at the Port of History Museum during a duo recital with pianist Andre-Michel Schub presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Danilo Perez makes his own opportunities. Playing Thursday evening at the Meiji-En restaurant, the pianist surprised his audience by adding an extra beat to the five-note, two-measure clave rhythm at the heart of most Afro-Latin music. Such heresy! Compositions that use 5/4 time signatures are more common in Bulgaria than Latin America. But Perez, who employed the device on "The Voyage," sees that fifth beat as a way to create even more permutations in his rhythmic explorations.
NEWS
April 24, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Beginning with three sales today, auctions over the next few days will offer rich opportunities to bid on dolls, glassware, Bucks County arts and crafts, and a miniature piano that once belonged to comedian Jimmy Durante. The piano, a so-called Tom Thumb, will be offered by Bonnie Brae Auction at one of today's sales, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the gallery on Route 724 in Spring City. It originally was in Palumbo's, the South Philadelphia restaurant that once was as famous as Durante himself until it was destroyed by fire a decade ago. Auctioneer Dana Knowlton expects it to sell for $4,500 on account of its provenance.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Lou Stein played piano in Billy Krechmer's house band for six or eight months bridging the years 1940-1941. He was 18 or 19 at the time and full of the urgent priorities of youth. He was a hard swinger in the rhythmic sense, long on intuition and flexibility, very insightful about the music of the day. Now, from the far reaches of nearly five decades, Lou Stein considers his fleeting apprenticeship in Krechmer's claustrophobic gin mill at 1627 Ranstead St. a period of great value to his musical development.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Bass-baritone Eric Owens, one of Philadelphia's great performing arts success stories, sets such a high standard in opera you have to respect the kinds of recital risks heard on Sunday at the Kimmel Center. As risks will, they had varying degrees of success. Titled Eric Owens and Friends, the concert was presented by the Curtis Institute of Music (from which he graduated in 1995) and wasn't just a showcase for his godlike voice, which can be scaled down to an intense whisper. Four other current Curtis students (who are more like young professionals)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'Sutter fell in the well," a character says early in August Wilson's The Piano Lesson . Wilson, who died soon after completing his Century Cycle (10 plays about African American life in each decade of the 20th century), wrote that line, and then wondered, "Who's Sutter?" Such are the mysterious workings of the creative process. Sutter, it turns out, is a ghost who haunts a family. It is 1936. The place, as it almost always is in Wilson's plays, is his own neighborhood, Pittsburgh's Hill District.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
If you want to hear the piano talent of tomorrow, you might press your ear to the wall of Eleanor Sokoloff's studio. In pedagogical tones that manage to be both sharp and warmly supportive, Sokoloff flourishes as one of the Curtis Institute of Music's busier piano professors. She's 101 years old. No eavesdropping was necessary Sunday afternoon. Eight current and former Sokoloff students stepped onto the stage of the Barnes Foundation's small auditorium to pay tribute. What is it like to study with Sokoloff?
NEWS
December 21, 2015
More than a box set, Vladimir Horowitz: The Unreleased Live Recordings 1966-1983 is closer to being its own musical planet, full of familiar yet strange creatures who adhere to no laws but their own. Of course, there's really only one creature, pianist Horowitz, a musician who truly lived up to the word legendary , though not necessarily because he was infallibly great. The 50-CD set ($149.52 on Amazon), originally recorded by Columbia (now Sony) and RCA, comes from a time when recording machines were ever-present at the live concerts he gave, recordings that were distilled down to an LP or two a year, with the rest left unheard by the public.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janice May Swan, 87, of Lafayette Hill, a mother of six who made music her lifelong passion, died Sunday, Dec. 6, of aspiration pneumonia at the Hill at Whitemarsh. Mrs. Swan embraced singing and playing the piano as a child growing up in Conshohocken. She graduated from Norristown High School in 1944 and later began a 30-year career as an operator with Bell Telephone in Norristown and Philadelphia. Along with her husband, James S., Mrs. Swan was involved in theater groups such as the Whitemarsh Curtain Callers and the Dramateurs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adele's new album, titled 25  is . . . wait for it . . . drum roll . . . everyone listening? . . . very good, a deserving follow-up to 21, one of the greatest-selling albums of all time. There must have been overwhelming pressure on Adele, already 27, to give an adoring world something to keep up the adoration. She responds confidently and in full voice, with a coherent concept, sustained bouts of excellent songwriting, and brave singing against some of the best production your ears can find.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
By now, audiences know how Elton John pulled the legendary Leon Russell out of the near-obscurity of tinny homemade albums and tiny club gigs; how the Okie-born, boogie piano player, righteously ragged vocalist, and '60s session giant recorded a plush duet album with Elton (2010's The Union ) and got his groove back. In reality, Russell's own bootstrap-pulling since then has aided his comeback most. The fleshy Memphis vibes of 2014's Life Journey , the recent release of Les Blank's long-hidden documentary, A Poem is a Naked Person , and 2015 shows with the Tedeschi Trucks Band where Russell relived Mad Dogs & Englishmen , the pianist's raucous 1970 tour film with fellow white soul-shouter Joe Cocker, show that the wonky rock-and-roller is in (literal)
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Ferree Jenkins Jr., 39, of Scranton and Philadelphia, a classically trained conductor and pianist and the musical director for theater at the University of the Arts, died in his sleep Thursday, Nov. 5, at home. The cause of his death was not immediately known. Mr. Jenkins performed in 49 states and several foreign countries. From Broadway to national tours, he was involved in more than 150 productions, his family said. But in Philadelphia, he was best known as music director at the Brind School of Theater Arts at the University of the Arts, where he was an assistant professor with a heavy course load.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
You could argue that Victoria, the title character of Sebastian Schipper's bold one-night-in-Berlin drama, displays poor judgment when it comes to the company she keeps, the cars she agrees to climb into. It could also be argued that four-star hotels are more discerning about guests looking for a room without a reservation and that there are probably surveillance cameras in those elevators, too. And wouldn't the Berlin police show a little more skill in cordoning off an apartment building where a couple of fugitives are hiding out?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Chopin Without Piano? Who would dare separate the 19th-century Polish composer from the instrument most associated with him, and why write a one-woman play that does just that? Though Frédéric Chopin left Poland at 20 never to return, Poles revere him; playing with his image is, for them, musical and cultural heresy. But that is the intent of Polish director Michal Zadara and his wife, actor and codirector Barbara Wysocka, who are the Warsaw theater company Centrala. In Chopin Without Piano , which had its North American premiere at Swarthmore College's Lang Concert Hall on Saturday night, they inserted Wysocka as a surrogate for the piano.
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