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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
The Eaken Piano Trio brought two fascinating yet incomplete works to the Fleisher Art Memorial yesterday afternoon. The first, a movement from Rebecca Clarke's Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano, we can only hope was a kind of tease for another concert - when the musicians will play the entire work. The second, by Philadelphia composer Margaret Garwood, was commissioned last year by the trio and has yet to be finished. For the first two movements of her Hommages, Garwood chose to pay tribute to composers Olivier Messiaen and Alberto Ginastera.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 47), known as the Kreutzer sonata, a looming presence in the Highlands Duo repertoire, was the peak at the end of the trail at a recital on Saturday at the Germantown branch of the Settlement Music School. The violinist and pianist, however, made their most dramatic musical statements earlier. Violinist Kate Ransom and pianist Anthony Sirianni billed the concert as a Carnegie Hall preview. Their debut is set for Feb. 4. Ransom and Sirianni met in 1984 at the Highlands Chamber Music Festival in North Carolina (hence the name)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tori Amos is a lucky woman. Many talented pop singer-songwriters and pianists never work with a band or producer who can assist in creating an album as dynamic and chilling as Amos' Little Earthquakes (Atlantic), released last year. Amos also found a director capable of producing a music video that grabbed four nominations at this year's MTV awards. Tuesday's concert at the Keswick Theater in Glenside, the first of two sold-out nights that featured only Amos and her piano, made it evident how important those people were in launching her career.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
After a tender, Chet Baker-influenced reading of "Where or When" in which his ruminative vocals were supported by appropriately shaded piano chords, Harry Connick Jr. told Sunday's near-capacity crowd at the Academy of Music that he didn't fully consider the song's lyric until his 38th attempt to record it for the When Harry Met Sally . . . soundtrack. This may have seemed an endearing confession to the majority of the crowd, which was wild about 22-year-old Harry - his Armani suit, his suave patter, his Sinatra affectations, his piano theatrics, his boyish New Orleans charm.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
JAVON JACKSON QUARTET. Blue Moon Jazz Cafe and Restaurant, The Bourse Building, 4th Street between Market and Chestnut. 7:30 and 10 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $20. Info: 215-413-2272. As the tide of young neo-traditional jazz saxophonists ebbs, those left ashore face a problem: How to grow musically, yet be unique among the dozens of sax players out there. Javon Jackson is at this stage, and the 30-year-old with the unadorned style has selected a piano-less quartet as the vehicle with which to experiment.
NEWS
October 14, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though not rare, Christoph Eschenbach's returns to the keyboard - his first career - are infrequent and special occasions indeed. On piano, he practices his art under circumstances more circumscribed than when conducting, and with a bristling brinksmanship inherent to challenging repertoire prepared in an inevitably limited time between conducting assignments. The young Eschenbach triumphed with intimidating repertoire, but the pianist-turned-conductor took on a piece that was in some ways as difficult on Sunday in a Philadelphia Orchestra Chamber Music concert.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Violinists - but few others - know the Camille Saint Saens Sonata No. 1 in D minor (Op. 75) - a handsome structure, whose flamboyance is supported by technical terrors. Jascha Heifetz made it one of his many signature pieces, and his interpretation is as good a reason as any that it is so seldom heard on the concert stage. After his Olympian perfectionism, who would dare? Cho-Liang Lin dared Thursday night at the Port of History Museum during a duo recital with pianist Andre-Michel Schub presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Danilo Perez makes his own opportunities. Playing Thursday evening at the Meiji-En restaurant, the pianist surprised his audience by adding an extra beat to the five-note, two-measure clave rhythm at the heart of most Afro-Latin music. Such heresy! Compositions that use 5/4 time signatures are more common in Bulgaria than Latin America. But Perez, who employed the device on "The Voyage," sees that fifth beat as a way to create even more permutations in his rhythmic explorations.
NEWS
April 24, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Beginning with three sales today, auctions over the next few days will offer rich opportunities to bid on dolls, glassware, Bucks County arts and crafts, and a miniature piano that once belonged to comedian Jimmy Durante. The piano, a so-called Tom Thumb, will be offered by Bonnie Brae Auction at one of today's sales, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the gallery on Route 724 in Spring City. It originally was in Palumbo's, the South Philadelphia restaurant that once was as famous as Durante himself until it was destroyed by fire a decade ago. Auctioneer Dana Knowlton expects it to sell for $4,500 on account of its provenance.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Lou Stein played piano in Billy Krechmer's house band for six or eight months bridging the years 1940-1941. He was 18 or 19 at the time and full of the urgent priorities of youth. He was a hard swinger in the rhythmic sense, long on intuition and flexibility, very insightful about the music of the day. Now, from the far reaches of nearly five decades, Lou Stein considers his fleeting apprenticeship in Krechmer's claustrophobic gin mill at 1627 Ranstead St. a period of great value to his musical development.
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NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez ruled Monday against Charlie Birnbaum, a piano tuner fighting to keep his family home near the former Revel casino from being seized by the state casino redevelopment authority. In a 27-page opinion issued Monday evening, Mendez said the state's enactment of the Tourism District Act is "the legislative declaration of a legitimate public purpose" that would justify the seizure of property by eminent domain. "The fundamental public purpose contained in this legislation is to promote tourism, to create and protect jobs in Atlantic City, and to assist the ailing gaming industry," Mendez wrote.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUDY Spitzer suffered through two great upheavals in her life, one caused by human venality and the other by nature. As a teenager, she was caught up in the Holocaust, but managed through guts and ingenuity to escape the Nazis, who murdered her father and other family members. Then, 70 years later, Hurricane Katrina drove her and her husband out of New Orleans, where they were teaching at a medical school. Finally settling in the relative peace of the Philadelphia area, Judy could look back on a life of accomplishment realized in the toils of catastrophes that might have wrecked less fearless souls.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
This year, the Philadelphia Orchestra's official opening night - the one that lets you mingle with the maestro at an "exclusive" reception topping out at $2,500 per ticket - doesn't come until a couple of weeks into the season. Actual music-making, though, began in Verizon Hall on Friday night, with no less a gala soloist than Lang Lang. Many listeners in these parts still think of the pianist as an aberrantly eccentric Curtis Institute of Music student, and, for better or worse, in the last decade and a half of his working with every major orchestra and conductor on earth, absolutely nothing has rubbed off on him musically.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suproteem Sarkar has coauthored two scientific papers on cancer treatments, been a presenter at an international nanoscience conference, and won accolades as a pianist. But perhaps the most notable entry on his resumé is the birth date - Sarkar is 17, just entering his senior year at Conestoga High School in Berwyn, Chester County. "He's definitely a highflier here," said Conestoga principal Amy Meisinger. "He's on the fast track for something. " Family members say his precocity was evident almost from the beginning.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In church, a singer can hit a sequence of notes with such visceral power that congregants spring to their feet in a move more spirit-inspired than standing ovation. Pottstown singer Candace Benson made gospel superstar Donnie McClurkin stand up. It happened on an episode of Sunday Best , a gospel singing competition shown on the cable network BET. Benson, a finalist, catapulted through a key transition with such melodic dexterity and emotion that McClurkin, a judge, and much of the audience just could not stay seated.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
On the surface, the Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy's concerts seem like a summertime variation on what's typically heard at the Curtis Institute, Astral Artists, and other local havens for young musicians. However, the first three PYPA concerts in the eight-day festival, now in its second year, featured mavericks of varying sorts, all artists through and through, but at times crossing the line into full-blown eccentricity. By design or by accident, PYPA is not more of the same.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - The Golandsky Institute's annual International Piano Festival, in its concert with the New Jersey Symphony, demonstrated that its methods, which promote injury-free pianism, don't produce conformity. It's a valid concern. Sharp-eared music lovers can often identify students of a particular teacher without knowing the player's resumé. But on Thursday at Richardson Auditorium, Golandsky mainstays Ilya Itin and Sean Duggan showed little family resemblance when Itin performed Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 12 (K. 414)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seeds of Meei-Ling Ng's future life as an artist and urban farmer in Philadelphia were planted early, and far away, in the village of Lim Chu Kang, in a rural corner of Singapore. With three siblings, she grew up on a five-acre farm, where the family grew orchids, raised ducks, turkeys, chickens, and pigs, and pets - cats, dogs, rabbits, parrots - were plentiful. "It was heaven for us," recalls Ng, pronounced ung , who smiles wistfully at the memory of her grandmother's rambutan, mango, coconut, and jackfruit trees.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IN A 2008 interview, piano teacher Anton Fomin described his work: "Teaching is like playing piano with my students' hands. It's very gratifying and satisfying. " Yesterday, Fomin, 44, was charged with sexually abusing three 6-year-old pupils, Chester County District Attorney Tom Hogan said. The instructor is accused of using his position at the Malvern School of Music - from which he has since been fired - to abuse two girls and a boy during one-on-one lessons. The allegations came to light last week, when a girl's father called Malvern police to report that the mother of another 6-year-old pupil had told him that her daughter said Fomin "puts his hand in [her]
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The piano had no use. Someone hauled the beat-up piano into a big trash bin parked at a nursing home in Germantown, then took off. The woman had no memory. Sometimes, her son had to remind her to change her clothes or turn off the gas stove after cooking. But when the piano came into the life of the 79-year-old mother, magic happened, not only for her, but for all the seniors at the NewCourtland LIFE Center in North Philadelphia. The story begins two years ago with R. Max Kent.
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