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Piano Bar

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NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If there's one thing the landmark restaurant Odette's will never be excused of having, it's an identity crisis. A lot of places have brunch and serve the kind of Continental comfort food that Odette's does, but few restaurants have been the life of the party, so to speak. Give or take a few years, this charming restaurant that sits like a barge along the Delaware River has been a mainstay of old-time Bucks County entertainment since the 1960s. Back then, the place was run by Odette Myrtil Logan, a Parisian and former film and Broadway actress whose buoyant personality was said to reflect her years in the Ziegfeld Follies.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Another fun weekend at the Shore is here, and the club scene is hotter than ever. But if you happen to feel like chilling a bit, the Downtown Bistro at the Irish Pub (St. James Place at the Boardwalk, Atlantic City; 609-344-9063) has some cool offerings. The adorable outdoor patio, where even the trash cans are cute, recently became the site of weekly karaoke nights, now Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 to midnight. (No cover charge.) T-shirts and souvenir mugs are awarded to everyone willing to get up and make complete fools . . . er, sing their favorite tunes.
LIVING
November 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Someone says "piano bar," and you'll likely conjure up an image of something romantically Old World. Dark, smoky room. Tuxedo-clad musician. Sinatra, Sondheim and Styne fans heartily singing old, boozy songs and stuffing dollars into a giant snifter. Yet lately there's another kind of piano scene playing: This one has hipsters in pricey jeans, guys with names like "Tony T" and "Wildman Joe" pounding eighty-eights and belting "Rich Girl" and "Stray Cat Strut. " It has waitstaff hula-dancing on stage.
NEWS
January 31, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr. Daily News Staff Writer
The steady rain and darkness have turned New Hope's notorious River Road into a blacktop ribbon of twisting, foot-on-the-brake uncertainty. Locals, of course, glide along fearlessly. Others squint and curse oncoming idiots too lazy to switch off their blinding high beams. But come they do to Odette's - free of fear, full of song. They come on this wet, nasty night to sing along with Andy. That's Andy Prescott, the baby-faced wannabe actor-slash-piano player who holds forth at Odette's piano bar on Friday nights.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Market Street Live, the sprawling Center City sports-bar complex that included Phillies legend Mike Schmidt as an investor, closed for good last weekend. The Dallas-based company that had managed the complex since it opened in April 1990 said the bar fell victim to several factors, including the economy and the fact that popular summer-only bars and restaurants on the Delaware riverfront "pulled traffic out of the downtown area. " Market Street Live had encompassed five distinct places in the basement and street levels of the Mellon Independence Center - the former Lit Bros.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Yikes! Time sure does fly when you're having fun. That's why it's a good idea to stock up on what's left of the summer good times. One of the best spots to enjoy the sun and sea breezes is the Longport Inn, 31st Street and Atlantic Avenue, Longport; 609-822-5435. The 78-year-old landmark - Longport's only bar - each weekend features lively action on the patio, which is popular with the younger set. One of the biggest attractions here is the munchies menu, featuring a variety of exotic crab platters ($9.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Meatballs the size of baseballs arrived at the table on our right. Dark green salads striped with glistening roasted red peppers and anchovies were delivered on our left. The wine list was fairly priced, and the entrees were enormous. South Philly, right? No, Chestnut Hill. Ristorante Uzzolo, housed in the former quarters of 21 West, is the Hill's only Italian restaurant. As you might imagine, this is no checked-tablecloth, candles-in-Chianti bottles Mama Leone's wannabe. The menu is Italian from start to finish, while the atmosphere remains largely Chestnut Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
You might not find Sachertortes or violins at Andreotti's Viennese Cafe, but there is always an interesting dessert tray and some music to help you dance away the dinner calories. This charming Cherry Hill restaurant has three large dining rooms - one with art-deco prints and brocade-lined booths called Stars - a fixed-price menu (of sorts) with Mediterranean dishes, and superb service. The Viennese tag goes back to the days when Andreotti's was basically a bakery. Or as Marianne Andreotti likes to describe it: "We started as a bakery that served food and grew into a restaurant that has its own bakery.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Eating at Jenny's Bistro, one of six restaurants owned and managed by Peddler's Village here, is a lot like dining in any other upscale establishment. The place is billed as having a French country setting, but there is also a modish piano bar circa 1980, and a family-friendly Sunday brunch. Entrees range from dinner salads and homemade soups to grilled sirloin and portabella ravioli. The food is attractively presented and plated with sauces and al dente vegetables. Still, with menu descriptions such as mustard beurre blanc, haricots verts, balsamic reduction and portabella demi, you might feel compelled to order a bottle of Beaujolais.
LIVING
December 17, 2000 | By Alex Richmond, FOR THE INQUIRER
As one walks into Teller's Bar, it isn't obvious right away that the room is attached to a sleek and modern hotel. Instead, you're transported back to the 1930s, when the building at 1234 Market St. was originally built, and into classic art deco decor. The room itself is square, and the main bar has metal concentric circles hanging overhead, but the pure geometry of the space never boxes one in; there are plenty of places to move. All of the smooth black marble floors are intact; a fresco mural in autumnal colors looms above the back dining area.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 4, 2011 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
FORT WORTH, Texas - It is so much simpler and safer out there, where the biggest threat is a helmeted 300-pound sociopath who spent all week preparing to hurt you. "I'm always trying to get better," Ben Roethlisberger said. "I'm trying to make better decisions, smarter decisions that help this team. I try not to put us in a bad situation. " The Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback was talking about out there, on the field. He was talking about throwing a football. But his words would resonate all the more when applied to the rest of Roethlisberger's life, the part that takes place away from the controlled chaos of the football field.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
A long-running scam spearheaded by a group of grifters who bilked a Lawncrest man out of $87,000 finally came to an end earlier this week. It's a convoluted tale, one that police say hinged on the ability of three con artists to charm and manipulate an unsuspecting 80-year-old man. The sweet ride ended on Tuesday for two of the thieves, Tiffany Mitchell, 21, and George Wallace, 22. The married crooks, who live in an apartment on Spruce...
LIVING
November 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Someone says "piano bar," and you'll likely conjure up an image of something romantically Old World. Dark, smoky room. Tuxedo-clad musician. Sinatra, Sondheim and Styne fans heartily singing old, boozy songs and stuffing dollars into a giant snifter. Yet lately there's another kind of piano scene playing: This one has hipsters in pricey jeans, guys with names like "Tony T" and "Wildman Joe" pounding eighty-eights and belting "Rich Girl" and "Stray Cat Strut. " It has waitstaff hula-dancing on stage.
NEWS
May 5, 2009 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Condoleezza Rice was 3, she could read music before she could read words. "It was always clear in my mind that I was going to be a great concert musician," the former secretary of state told students yesterday at Bodine High School for International Affairs in North Philadelphia. "I studied and worked hard at piano. " But as a sophomore at the Aspen Institute, surrounded by music proteges, Rice had a "crisis of confidence. " "I met 12-year-olds who could play from sight everything it took me all year to learn.
SPORTS
February 27, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Oscar De La Hoya plans to fight three times this year, then retire. "I'm at that stage of my career now where I can't take it further," the 35-year-old De La Hoya said yesterday. "I can't go on for the next two years, three years. It's just time to hang up the gloves. "This is the year. " De La Hoya was speaking with a small group of reporters after a New York news conference to discuss his May 3 bout against Steve Forbes, a runner-up on television's Tournament of Contenders.
SPORTS
January 11, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Christopher Bowman, the former U.S. figure skating champion called "Bowman the Showman" for his flare on the ice, died yesterday of a possible drug overdose, authorities said. He was 40. Bowman was pronounced dead at 12:06 p.m., said Coroner's Lt. Joe Bale, who was not immediately able to provide more details on the overdose. Bowman's body was found at a motel in North Hills, and an autopsy is planned for this weekend, Bale said. Bowman's mother, Joyce, confirmed to the Detroit Free Press that her son had died.
NEWS
June 19, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Culinary landmarks often have quirky traditions. But the Black Bass Hotel, a charming pre-Revolutionary War restaurant in Lumberville, is the only place I know that features such disparate elements as a pet cemetery and homemade biscuits, along with pictures of Princess Diana. You might not notice the cemetery, at the far end of the hotel parking lot, but I can almost guarantee that you'll find something to amuse you. As for the biscuits, they are part of the culinary thrills here, especially because they are served piping hot and in a wooden bowl at lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Few artists have rocketed to international fame as successfully as Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, the idol of many who would never dream of visiting an opera house but who will pay big bucks to attend his rare personal appearances. Most know the story: Bocelli lost his sight through a soccer accident at age 12, became a lawyer in Pisa while singing American pop songs at a piano bar, studied with the great tenor Franco Corelli, then sang a demo of a Zucchero song that was heard by Luciano Pavarotti.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If there's one thing the landmark restaurant Odette's will never be excused of having, it's an identity crisis. A lot of places have brunch and serve the kind of Continental comfort food that Odette's does, but few restaurants have been the life of the party, so to speak. Give or take a few years, this charming restaurant that sits like a barge along the Delaware River has been a mainstay of old-time Bucks County entertainment since the 1960s. Back then, the place was run by Odette Myrtil Logan, a Parisian and former film and Broadway actress whose buoyant personality was said to reflect her years in the Ziegfeld Follies.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Eating at Jenny's Bistro, one of six restaurants owned and managed by Peddler's Village here, is a lot like dining in any other upscale establishment. The place is billed as having a French country setting, but there is also a modish piano bar circa 1980, and a family-friendly Sunday brunch. Entrees range from dinner salads and homemade soups to grilled sirloin and portabella ravioli. The food is attractively presented and plated with sauces and al dente vegetables. Still, with menu descriptions such as mustard beurre blanc, haricots verts, balsamic reduction and portabella demi, you might feel compelled to order a bottle of Beaujolais.
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