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Piano Man

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NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in a long time, the piano man had no keyboard to call home. Out of habit, he drummed his beefy fingers on a tabletop as he told his story. Without bitterness or anger. Just a twinge of sadness. "It's a strange feeling to be away from it," he said. "I was shocked for a couple of days. " Maybe it's not fair to call Ted Gerike "piano man": Not once during his 22 years of playing five nights a week at the Society Hill Hotel did he perform Billy Joel's signature tune.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Several times during his performance Thursday at the CoreStates Center, Billy Joel asked for help. On this career-overview tour, he explained to the capacity crowd, he wants to open up his entire repertoire. So he's putting his song selections, both hits and rarities, to a vote: Would the audience like to hear "Movin' Out," from his 1977 breakthrough The Stranger, or would they prefer "Big Man on Mulberry Street," from 1986's The Bridge? The response was overwhelming: "Movin' Out. " Seconds later, in about the time it takes a jukebox to locate a selection, the band ripped into it. "That was easy," Joel shouted over the intro.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | by Regina Medina , Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Sounds as if the alphabet-lovin' doc from "Survivor" is up for another 5 minutes of fame. Dr. Sean Kenniff is locked in a Long Island Love Triangle with singer-songwriter Billy Joel and Joel's former galpal newscaster Trish Bergin, the New York Post reported yesterday on its front page. Bring on the dish! Seems that the "Piano Man" is still smitten with his ex with whom things cooled down in September after six months of dating, the paper reports. Making matters funkier, the Former Mrs. Joel, Christie Brinkley, set up the two lovebirds.
NEWS
July 22, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alfred F. Nappi, 84, a classically trained pianist whose career as a piano player in bars and nightclubs as Al Nash spanned six decades, died July 10 at Leisure Chateau Nursing Home in Lakewood from cancer. Born in Philadelphia and raised on Harmony Street in South Philadelphia, Mr. Nappi attended Southern High School. He was told early in his life by his parents that he was going to learn the piano, said his son Richard A. Nappi of Sea Isle City. He initially was tutored by a piano teacher.
SPORTS
October 1, 1986 | By Herm L. Rogul, Special to The Inquirer
Chris Kelly is the MVP - most valuable pianist - on the La Salle University soccer team. "Our soccer team is close-knit," said Kelly, a West Deptford grad. "We have a lot of parties or get-togethers. I bring my portable electric piano if there isn't a piano already there. Bob Brill is a really good singer of pop and rock tunes. He's energetic and he gets a crowd going. "My roommate, Mike Curley, is a very good soccer player, but he's recovering from an ankle injury. He likes Phil Collins, and he's always asking me to play Phil Collins tunes.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
Steve Kuhn is a tall, bespectacled, scholarly-looking man of 53 equipped with a sun-dappled voice reminiscent of the late Dick Haymes'. And wouldn't you know it - he rarely sings this side of the shower. Steve Kuhn does play an awfully lot of piano. Sight unseen, one might mistake him for McCoy Tyner except for that slightly lighter right foot when he is at his most orchestral. In fact, Steve Kuhn once was McCoy Tyner for three or four months around 1960. He was the original piano in the John Coltrane Quartet, but purely as a swing man until Tyner, a close boyhood friend of Coltrane's in Philadelphia, had finished his commitment with the Benny Golson-Art Farmer Jazztet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Hicks, like many other jazz musicians, credits a lot of his work to the music and lifestyle of John Coltrane. "He was a musical hero, sure," Hicks said from his Manhattan home. "But he was also a hero in terms of his spiritual values. He gave a lot to us as far as that is concerned, and I am not the only musician to say that. " But Hicks said he thinks Trane, the tenor sax legend, has had an even more pronounced influence on his music, especially considering that he is a pianist.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
The question is one Ignat Solzhenitsyn can't answer easily. Where, he is asked, is home? "It depends on how you define home," replies the confident 21-year-old piano virtuoso, who is pursuing degrees in piano and conducting at the Curtis Institute. "I haven't lived with my parents for seven years now. I've been living in different cities. " The concept of home is a complex one for Solzhenitsyn, one of three sons of the expatriate writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn. He was born in Moscow; he was 18 months old when the Soviet Union expelled his father for criticizing the repressive Communist regime.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
For a guy who's been threatening to hang up his rock 'n' roll shoes, Billy Joel is hardly going slowly into that dark night. His phone has been ringing off the hook since September, when Joel first went public with his long-brewing agenda of creating only serious instrumental music in the foreseeable future. In the doing, he'll be giving up on the pop balladry and rock anthems that have put him on the Top 40 chart an amazing 33 times since 1974. Our first clue to a career change afoot was actually the final track of his last, 1993 "River of Dreams" album, aptly named "Famous Last Words.
LIVING
November 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Someone says "piano bar," and you'll likely conjure up an image of something romantically Old World. Dark, smoky room. Tuxedo-clad musician. Sinatra, Sondheim and Styne fans heartily singing old, boozy songs and stuffing dollars into a giant snifter. Yet lately there's another kind of piano scene playing: This one has hipsters in pricey jeans, guys with names like "Tony T" and "Wildman Joe" pounding eighty-eights and belting "Rich Girl" and "Stray Cat Strut. " It has waitstaff hula-dancing on stage.
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NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Much has happened to Billy Joel since his sellout shows last summer at Citizens Bank Park, which was also Thursday night's venue. Once each month, in an amazing display of audience loyalty and personal dedication, Joel has been packing them in at Madison Square Garden. Then Wednesday, at age 66, Billy became the father of another daughter, Della Rose Joel, after recently having married (in April) his 33-year-old then-girlfriend Alexis. So there was much to celebrate Thursday night, and Joel hit the stage in kinetic, fired-up form from the start.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Much has happened to Billy Joel since his sell-out shows last summer at Citizens Bank Park, which was also Thursday night's venue. Once each month, in an amazing display of audience loyalty and personal dedication, Joel has been packing them in at Madison Square Garden. Then on Wednesday, at the age of 66, Billy became the father of a baby girl, Della Rose Joel, after recently having married (in April) his 33-year-old then-girlfriend Alexis. So there was much to celebrate on Thursday night, and Joel hit the CBP in kinetic, fired-up form from the start.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Get a good look at Danny Kean - pounding the keys as his dog, Mo, snoozes atop his piano, jammed in the bed of his old red pickup truck. Because he won't be in Philadelphia for long. Gray-haired and goateed, Kean may be the last of the hard-core troubadours. He talks fast, thinks deep, and moves on. He has no home, no job, and no money. What he's got is a 1987 Toyota, three-quarters of a tank of gas, and a belief that bringing piano music to people across the continent affords them, and him, a certain kind of enlightenment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Bruce Klauber, For The Inquirer
Some call it a house party, others a "sing-in. " Whatever it's called, the musical event that goes on every Tuesday at D'Angelo's Ristorante Italiano in Center City is hard to fit into two words. Certainly there are other open-mic sessions out there, but none just like this, the only one of its kind in Center City. Every Tuesday night for five years, an accomplished pianist/accompanist named Tom Adams, who has worked closely with the likes of Bette Midler and Cybill Shepherd, accompanies a group of singers, mainly amateur and semipros, who sing songs from Tin Pan Alley and Broadway musicals past and present.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Say the name "Liberace" and a dozen smiling images - each campier than the one before - pop into view, all fabulous, rhinestone-encrusted, fur-lined, and sprinkled with stardust. When he was part of the entertainment landscape from the 1950s through the 1980s on television or stage, Liberace's keyboard repertoire was one of showy pop/classical sides and willowy, winking conversational asides. And he was beloved, particularly by women, his sexuality rarely questioned (he won libel suits against Britain's Daily Mirror and Confidential magazine in the mid-'50s when they implied he was homosexual)
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Piano man "Bobby Chic" was part of the finger-snapping soundtrack for the Age of Cool. Born Robert M. Cicalese in South Philadelphia, he romanced the ivories from the Jersey Shore to Las Vegas and back again over a career that lasted until a couple of years before his death Wednesday, Jan. 30, at age 76. In the 1960s, he was one of the cats setting the casino surge to music along the Strip. But his favored haunt was Atlantic City, where he played Paul "Skinny" D'Amato's 500 Club, a heady mixed drink of mobsters, showgirls, Rat Packers, and backroom gamblers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012
B MOVIES NEED LOVE, TOO Secret Cinema proudly offers two worthy examples of the underappreciated genre: "Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome," a 1947 take on Chester Gould's comic strip police detective starring Ralph Byrd; and "The Brute Man," starring (and sort of about) disfigured actor Rondo Hatton. Free. 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Chestnut Hill Branch of the Free Library, 8711 Germantown Ave., 215-248-0977. SUPERTRAMP MAN Guitar virtuoso Carl Verheyen (Supertramp, zillions of sessions)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2011 | By Jonathan Takiff
BILLY AND Philly. We've always been a team. Billy Joel has played and sold out more shows (56) at our South Philadelphia arenas and stadiums than any other solo artist. And while this brashly gregarious, immensely gifted singer/keyboardist/composer has moved more than 150 million albums worldwide, local fans have been in his corner and buying his music the absolute longest. For proof, look no further than the gatefold Billy Joel CD package hitting stores today and also available in download form, with liner notes by yours truly - but more on that later.
SPORTS
February 4, 2011 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
FORT WORTH, Texas - It is so much simpler and safer out there, where the biggest threat is a helmeted 300-pound sociopath who spent all week preparing to hurt you. "I'm always trying to get better," Ben Roethlisberger said. "I'm trying to make better decisions, smarter decisions that help this team. I try not to put us in a bad situation. " The Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback was talking about out there, on the field. He was talking about throwing a football. But his words would resonate all the more when applied to the rest of Roethlisberger's life, the part that takes place away from the controlled chaos of the football field.
LIVING
November 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Someone says "piano bar," and you'll likely conjure up an image of something romantically Old World. Dark, smoky room. Tuxedo-clad musician. Sinatra, Sondheim and Styne fans heartily singing old, boozy songs and stuffing dollars into a giant snifter. Yet lately there's another kind of piano scene playing: This one has hipsters in pricey jeans, guys with names like "Tony T" and "Wildman Joe" pounding eighty-eights and belting "Rich Girl" and "Stray Cat Strut. " It has waitstaff hula-dancing on stage.
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