CollectionsPiano Sonatas
IN THE NEWS

Piano Sonatas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Because Beethoven returned again and again to a kind of music - piano sonatas, string quartets, trios - one or two of each genre tend to stand for the whole catalog. Audiences hear the same three piano sonatas, and the same two violin sonatas, from those who hope to be known as Beethoven performers without having to understand the whole musical landscape. In their Beethoven recital last night at the Port of History Museum, pianist Peter Serkin and violinist Young Uck Kim played some of the other violin sonatas, the relatively early ones that show Beethoven searching, testing, and growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was conceived as a marathon performance of all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas. But 11 sonatas and a couple of themes and variations ain't bad, either. That's what eight pianists will play Saturday in a seven-hour event being billed as "A Beethoven Sonatathon. " "We were looking for ways to add excitement to the orchestra's Beethoven Festival," says David Pocock, the Philadelphia Orchestra's education director, who organized the event. "I came here from the [Irving S.] Gilmore International Keyboard Festival in Michigan, and one of the most successful things we did there was a Beethoven sonata festival.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Even when the piano on the Perelman Theater stage is a sturdy Steinway concert grand, an on-site tuner is needed when the recitalist is Vladimir Feltsman. On Wednesday, the need arose first at intermission, after a pair of Haydn sonatas. Then, midway through Chopin's four ballades, more was required, though Feltsman probably wouldn't have stopped otherwise for anything less than an earthquake. The 60-year-old Russian-born, U.S.-based pianist is not a pounder. But he plays a piano as though he is speaking through it. And he has a lot to say, which meant that the Haydn Piano Sonatas No. 34 and 49 - conversational even in the most conventional performances - have rarely seemed more eventful.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
I ADMIT IT. Schumann's music has always eluded me. Sure, there are a few pretty piano works and some lovely songs, but I've never been convinced by the larger works. They always seemed like miniatures inflated beyond their inspiration, imitating Schubert while awaiting Brahms. Well, the Philadelphia Orchestra's three-CD set of Schumann's music has brought me much closer. I'm not yet an enthusiastic convert like recording engineer George Blood, but there's no denying these works' considerable appeal.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Somebody needed to program the orphans in Beethoven's output, and pianist Anton Kuerti was the one to do it at his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Wednesday at the Kimmel Center. Never a glamour pianist, the 73-year-old Vienna-born, Canada-based Kuerti - his hair longer and wilder than ever - has been performing cycles of Beethoven sonatas for as far back as I can remember (40 years) and is a model of nonapologist performers. As majestic as Beethoven can be, his piano sonatas contain some of his most private music - cranky, quirky, and not always clear in what it has to say, especially pieces published not in a litter, but by themselves, without catchy subtitles or nicknames.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When, exactly, Rudolf Buchbinder moved into the front ranks of concert pianists is hard to pinpoint. He has been in evidence since entering (but not winning) the 1966 Van Cliburn Competition and has long insinuated himself through European-made recordings centering on Beethoven, Schubert, and Brahms. They exude solidity and remind you that the middle of the road can be as stimulating as the outer fringe. At 68, Buchbinder only now has made his solo recital debut here, presented Friday at the Kimmel Center by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1986 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Bach's "St. John Passion" may not be as noble or sublime as the more familiar gospel according to St. Matthew. Yet, its gripping power, almost- savage crowd choruses and dramatic characterizations make it a more exciting work, though difficult to bring off: There are few wind solos, with strings silent during the utterances of Christ. The piece is a specialty of the Philadelphia Singers led by Michael Korn, and their annual Good Friday performance this evening at 8 - 262 years to the day after its Leipzig premiere - is said to be the first reading of the work at the Academy of Music (Broad and Locust)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The Mozart on the Square festival continues its outpouring of Wolfgang Amadeus and his contemporaries, with three weekend concerts scheduled at the Church of the Holy Trinity, 1904 Walnut St. Tonight at 8 p.m. ($6), An Die Musik performs works for string trio, with the addition of piano and oboe, in compositions by Mozart and Beethoven. Sonatas by the same composers, as well as a fantasie by Schubert, are on the bill of gifted sisters Mi-Young Park (violin) and Pong-Hi Park (piano)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Johann (or Jan) Nopumuk Hummel was just enough of a musical star to stand - and suffer - comparison with the great musicians of his day. A contemporary of Beethoven, Hummel, an Austrian piano prodigy whose father took him at 11 on a European tour to match Mozart's, succeeded in every way - except for posterity. He studied piano with Mozart and, later, composition with Salieri and Albrechtsberger; he taught Henselt and Thalberg, the great virtuosos, and he preceded Liszt as music director in Weimar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Daniel Barenboim's performances last season of Beethoven's complete Piano Sonatas proved to be high points in the cities in which he appeared, including Philadelphia. The concerts were preludes to the recordings, which are just beginning to be issued. The recitalist playing the complete cycle must give a good deal of thought to the grouping of works for each concert. Barenboim, like most, made each recital include early, middle and late selections. The disks also follow that plan; the first one groups three of the most popular: Sonatas No. 8, No. 14 and No. 23 (DGG 419 602-1)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When, exactly, Rudolf Buchbinder moved into the front ranks of concert pianists is hard to pinpoint. He has been in evidence since entering (but not winning) the 1966 Van Cliburn Competition and has long insinuated himself through European-made recordings centering on Beethoven, Schubert, and Brahms. They exude solidity and remind you that the middle of the road can be as stimulating as the outer fringe. At 68, Buchbinder only now has made his solo recital debut here, presented Friday at the Kimmel Center by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Most siblings look back on a childhood of pick-up football games and getting into scrapes together. Ashley, Daniel, and Andrew Hsu, on the other hand, may remember the time they played Beethoven's last three piano sonatas on a single program while still students at the Curtis Institute of Music. That time was Wednesday night in Field Concert Hall. They could have chosen a strand of Beethoven bagatelles, or taken turns with the Goldberg Variations, if the only point had been to play up the familial connection.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Somebody needed to program the orphans in Beethoven's output, and pianist Anton Kuerti was the one to do it at his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Wednesday at the Kimmel Center. Never a glamour pianist, the 73-year-old Vienna-born, Canada-based Kuerti - his hair longer and wilder than ever - has been performing cycles of Beethoven sonatas for as far back as I can remember (40 years) and is a model of nonapologist performers. As majestic as Beethoven can be, his piano sonatas contain some of his most private music - cranky, quirky, and not always clear in what it has to say, especially pieces published not in a litter, but by themselves, without catchy subtitles or nicknames.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Even when the piano on the Perelman Theater stage is a sturdy Steinway concert grand, an on-site tuner is needed when the recitalist is Vladimir Feltsman. On Wednesday, the need arose first at intermission, after a pair of Haydn sonatas. Then, midway through Chopin's four ballades, more was required, though Feltsman probably wouldn't have stopped otherwise for anything less than an earthquake. The 60-year-old Russian-born, U.S.-based pianist is not a pounder. But he plays a piano as though he is speaking through it. And he has a lot to say, which meant that the Haydn Piano Sonatas No. 34 and 49 - conversational even in the most conventional performances - have rarely seemed more eventful.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Though one of the foremost pianists of his generation, Till Fellner requires a detailed artistic introduction. Fellner, born and raised in Vienna and star student of the legendary Alfred Brendel, takes on the most substantial repertoire at the earlyish age of 38 and tends to triumph. His ECM-label recording of The Well-Tempered Clavier is one of the most highly acclaimed discs of its kind in recent years. Now, he's finishing up a three-year complete cycle of Beethoven's 32 piano sonatas and recently added Philadelphia to his American tour, filling in for an indisposed Ivan Moravec in a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert at 8 Tuesday night at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pianist Andras Schiff invites history's great composers into his life like artists in residence - for years at a time - with comprehensive, often undivided attention. The current object of his artistic serial monogamy is Beethoven's 32 sonatas: By next spring he will have played 20 complete cycles around the world over the last few years, as well as many miscellaneous one-offs, among them his all-Beethoven program presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at 8 p.m. Friday at the Kimmel Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
I ADMIT IT. Schumann's music has always eluded me. Sure, there are a few pretty piano works and some lovely songs, but I've never been convinced by the larger works. They always seemed like miniatures inflated beyond their inspiration, imitating Schubert while awaiting Brahms. Well, the Philadelphia Orchestra's three-CD set of Schumann's music has brought me much closer. I'm not yet an enthusiastic convert like recording engineer George Blood, but there's no denying these works' considerable appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was conceived as a marathon performance of all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas. But 11 sonatas and a couple of themes and variations ain't bad, either. That's what eight pianists will play Saturday in a seven-hour event being billed as "A Beethoven Sonatathon. " "We were looking for ways to add excitement to the orchestra's Beethoven Festival," says David Pocock, the Philadelphia Orchestra's education director, who organized the event. "I came here from the [Irving S.] Gilmore International Keyboard Festival in Michigan, and one of the most successful things we did there was a Beethoven sonata festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Franz Schubert, music's greatest melodist, is known for his art songs. His piano sonatas are not so well-known, but, points out pianist Andras Schiff, apart from songs, the piano sonata was the only important musical form the composer worked on throughout his life. Tonight, Schiff will devote his piano recital at the Port of History Museum to three of Schubert's 18 sonatas - the A-flat Major, D. 557; B Major, D. 575 and G Major, D. 894. At 40, Hungarian-born Schiff is at the younger end of a generation of pianists, Radu Lupu and Richard Goode among them, distinguished for their gravity and tonal beauty.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Because Beethoven returned again and again to a kind of music - piano sonatas, string quartets, trios - one or two of each genre tend to stand for the whole catalog. Audiences hear the same three piano sonatas, and the same two violin sonatas, from those who hope to be known as Beethoven performers without having to understand the whole musical landscape. In their Beethoven recital last night at the Port of History Museum, pianist Peter Serkin and violinist Young Uck Kim played some of the other violin sonatas, the relatively early ones that show Beethoven searching, testing, and growing.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|