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Piano

NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The sheer number of songs in I Love a Piano wouldn't surprise an Irving Berlin scholar - but their power and number astounded in Ray Roderick and Michael Berkeley's musical tribute. More than 50 selections from Berlin's songbook fill the delightful 95-minute production at the Walnut Street Independence Studio on 3. With a cast led by Ellie Mooney and Owen Pelesh, these songs soared, charmed with their winsomeness, and reminded listeners - with a nostalgic sense of loss - of the age in which Berlin wrote the lyrics and music for most of his greatest hits.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | by Phil Rosenthal, Los Angeles Daily News
The two films everyone is talking about these days are "The Piano" and "Ace Ventura - Pet Detective. " No one is sure what "The Piano" really means, and no one is sure why "Ace Ventura" is so popular. Actually, the success of "Ace" is easy to explain. It's laugh-out-loud funny. But no one will admit to laughing once the lights come up in the theater, which is why this remains a great debate. The real question is this: Which misunderstood film is the masterpiece? You be the judge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It takes an artist with Jane Campion's warp of mind and tilted perspectives to make a movie about a music lesson this recklessly romantic, offbeat and ecstatic. The Piano is nothing less than Campion's reimagining of "Little Red Riding Hood" - a fairy tale in which tiny, black-bonneted Holly Hunter kisses the Big Bad Wolf (Harvey Keitel) and turns him into a man. The Piano also strikes many other powerful chords. Shot in the rugged, muddy bush of Campion's native New Zealand and set in the mid-19th century, the film is about the encounter of several forces of nature with one singular force of nature, personified by Ada (Hunter)
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU NEEDED musical entertainment for a special event, Anthony White would have been your man. Anthony was a child prodigy on the piano, and in later years he was in demand everywhere, from funeral homes to churches to the performance halls where he opened for some of Philly's outstanding musicians. "Anthony was always willing to play for any event you asked," his family said. Anthony Rayvon White, who formerly worked for the Pennsylvania Unemployment Office and the University of Pennsylvania Science Center, a king of the barbecue grill who loved to entertain, died April 23 after a brief illness.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
No matter how well you think you know yourself, when it comes to romance you just never know who's going to tune your piano. This is no idle joke. It is - literally and figuratively - one of the themes at work in director Jane Campion's typically out-there new picture, "The Piano. " Holly Hunter stars as an obstinate 19th-century New Zealand widow promised, by her father, to a frontiersman (Sam Neill) in need of a wife. She goes willingly, taking her precocious 6-year-old daughter (Anna Paquin)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pianist Charles Abramovic and friends got together to salute Temple composer Maurice Wright Sunday afternoon with a recital of Wright's music at Rock Hall on the Temple campus. One friend was Marshall Taylor, who plays the saxophone. The other was a computer. Sorry, the machine's moniker wasn't listed on the program, only its functions. It supplied the sounds for Wright's Chamber Symphony for Piano and Electronic Sound - and the synthesized sounds and images for his Taylor Series, which also includes piano and alto saxophone.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF HIS SMILE was like a warm hug, as a fan put it, his piano playing was like a mellow caress. Father John D'Amico was not only an outstanding jazz pianist who gathered fans wherever he played throughout the city, but he was also a warm and fuzzy friend and a man devoted to social causes. When he died Thursday in Lankenau Hospital, doctors and nurses wept. "They really loved him," said his wife, Kathleen. "He was the kind of person you really liked. Since he died, I've been getting hundreds of messages.
NEWS
November 2, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Kahlil is a happy, bright 5-year-old with a beautiful smile. Very friendly, he delights in having his picture taken showing his big dimples. He enjoys interacting with other children and with adults at home and in the community. Kahlil can be very active and independent. His foster mother describes him as a lovable, energetic, and curious little boy. He loves playing any type of sport, especially basketball and football. He also has a variety of other interests, including playing the piano, riding his bike, maneuvering his toy cars, being read to, attending Children's Church, and anything that involves Spider-Man.
NEWS
September 30, 2009 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nate Polite and his friends were on a break, working in the summer gardening program at the R.W. Brown Community Center. Bored, and with few people around, the 17-year-old self-taught pianist took to his instrument. Sitting on the stage of the former auditorium-turned-cafeteria, he gently keyed Rihanna's "Unfaithful. " Passing through, director Barbara Hall stopped cold. "Nate!" Hall said. "When did you start playing piano? You take lessons? How did you learn that?" "I just listen to music," Nate said softly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1991 | By Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Wolfgang Sawallisch will demonstrate his multi-faceted musicianship on the podium and at the piano in the second of his two Philadelphia Orchestra weekends here this season. The orchestra's conductor-designate leads off with the baton in two Academy concerts, tomorrow and Saturday nights at 8. Following last week's superb all- Mozart programs, he has chosen two works by Antonin Dvorak complemented by Beethoven's Fourth Symphony. Soviet cellist Natalia Gutman will make her orchestra debut in Dvorak's romantic Cello Concerto, the most popular of its kind ever composed, and the Czech master's rare Symphonic Variations get a first orchestra reading as curtain-raiser.
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