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Piano

NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
N. Harry Gartzman, 94, of Philadelphia, a family physician who spent 23 years as chief physician for Camden schools, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Kennedy University Hospital-Cherry Hill. Music provided the theme to his life, with him asking for piano lessons at age 8 and playing at a saloon in Camden by 14. Graduating from Camden High School as valedictorian in 1937, Dr. Gartzman played parties to pay his tuition at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he received his bachelor's degree in 1941.
REAL_ESTATE
December 15, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Back in 1978, newlyweds Kathy and George Sideris didn't start married life in a cute, little cottage or apartment. Instead, they lived for two years in an expanded suite at the former Landmark Hotel in Maple Shade, where George was involved in operating the property. "It was a little strange, but we got used to it," explains Kathy, noting that the couple even had a small kitchen, which helped maintain some semblance of home life. But moving into a more conventional home was definitely a priority, and the Siderises got lucky: In Medford, they found a Tudor home that the builder of the surrounding cluster of custom homes had intended to occupy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WE'VE SEEN some odd court cases in Philadelphia - newspaper owners suing each other, for instance - but we've never heard of anything like the case going on in Girona, Spain. There, Sonia Bosom (imagine all the times she was called a "tithead" as a child) sued her upstairs neighbors and their daughter for noise pollution. The daughter, Laia Martin , isn't some kid banging a drum all day - she's a professional concert pianist. Crazier yet, prosecutor Emma Ruiz wants Martin to serve jail time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
FORT WORTH, Texas - The Kimbell Art Museum, designed by Philadelphia's Louis Kahn in 1972, may be better known today for its building than for its collection - and its collection is pretty breathtaking, thick with the likes of Michelangelo and Caravaggio. Scholars consider the Kimbell to be Kahn's masterpiece and one of the great museums of the 20th Century. If you've only seen photos of the exterior, a series of travertine vaults that some Texas wags have likened to a cow barn, it may be hard to appreciate the fuss.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
VOCAL WIZARD Bobby McFerrin likes to plan ahead to make each album and tour a special event. But, arguably, no project has been longer in gestation than "spirityouall," his fresh, frisky take on spirituals, which the world-hopping (Roxborough-based) artist issued recently in recorded form and performs live Sunday at the Kimmel Center. It's a creative venture that has taken most of his 63 years to bring to the table. "The template is 'Deep River,' an album of spirituals my father [opera singer Robert McFerrin Sr.]
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF HIS SMILE was like a warm hug, as a fan put it, his piano playing was like a mellow caress. Father John D'Amico was not only an outstanding jazz pianist who gathered fans wherever he played throughout the city, but he was also a warm and fuzzy friend and a man devoted to social causes. When he died Thursday in Lankenau Hospital, doctors and nurses wept. "They really loved him," said his wife, Kathleen. "He was the kind of person you really liked. Since he died, I've been getting hundreds of messages.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Having "Mac" Rebennack, the master of Crescent City funk and swampy voodoo soul known as Dr. John, appear at New Hope's dark, multicultural Havana eatery Wednesday - one week before Mischief Night and Halloween - was perfect timing. At 72, the good Doctor hasn't lost a bit of his murkily mysterious mystique, his flavorful dedication to the most joyful and most haunted elements of New Orleans' musicality, or that naughty crackle in his soulful, snarling voice signaling ghostly romanticism and danger.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For George Horner at age 19, music was an escape from the pain that surrounded him and his family in the Czechoslovakian concentration camp where they were imprisoned. Horner's passion for music endured through several near-misses with death, the loss of his family, and through the end of World War II. Later this month Horner, now 90, a retired physician and a resident of Newtown Square, will commemorate the lives lost in the Holocaust by performing on piano at Boston Symphony Hall alongside legendary cellist Yo-Yo Ma. The Oct. 22 performance was arranged by Mark Ludwig, the head of the Terezin Music Foundation, a Boston nonprofit group that honors the legacy of composers who died in the Holocaust.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's so good listening to old records," Allen Toussaint sings on his new album. And it's so good to hear old masters Toussaint and Ry Cooder in such fine form on their new records. Their live sets are among a spate of our favorite new roots-related releases. Songbook ( Rounder **** ) captures just Touissant and his piano at New York's Joe's Pub in 2009. The 75-year-old giant of New Orleans music is known more as a composer and arranger than as a performer, but like the great soul songwriter Dan Penn, he's as good an interpreter of his own material as anyone.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LILLIAN M. Lewandowski did her part for the war effort during World War II. She made Raisinets for the troops. That's not as far-fetched as it might sound. Lillian had to forgo a full scholarship to the University of Pennsylvania because her work for the Blumenthal Brothers Chocolate Co. was deemed essential to the war effort. Lillian Lewandowski, who after the war worked as a secretary for lawyers, then the U.S. Customs Agency and the Environmental Protection Agency, and used her musical talents to teach piano and organ and peform at area churches, died June 22. She was 88. She lived in Bensalem but had lived for many years in Frankford.
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