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Picture Books

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NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children have always asked the darndest questions. As times have changed, however, kiddie queries have addressed ever more complex, sensitive issues, often at younger ages. It's enough to leave adults red-faced and tongue-tied. Now, answers can increasingly be found by the fistful in the form of picture books, illustrated read-alouds aimed at 4- to 8-year-olds. Cosmetic surgery? Obesity? Prison? Picture books tackle it all - though some librarians frown over the quality of certain offerings.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Teacher Susan Moricca brings the horror of the Holocaust to her sixth graders through stories, illustrations and photographs. Five years before the state mandated Holocaust education in 1994, Moricca began teaching the subject to her social-studies students at Voorhees Middle School. She wanted to educate them about the complexity of the Holocaust but not expose them to images and concepts more appropriate to older students. At first, she said, she read to her class selections from an anthology of Holocaust literature.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Name: KidsTravel Books.com. What it does: You can browse children's books from all over the world to learn about other cultures, prepare for a trip, read book reviews and author interviews, get family travel tips, and more. What's hot : The depth of global coverage on Kids TravelBooks is unexpected and comprehensive, with books arranged by continent and country. I want to go to the Dominican Republic, but I'm not quite ready to book a flight. I wondered if it had any kids' books on it, clicked the link, and found four books that I could buy that might help me make a decision.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of mice cavorted, ran from an evil cat, sailed a ship and sought a new home at East Pikeland Elementary School on Thursday, but they never went farther than the drawing pad of their creator, children's author and illustrator Steven Kellogg. The borders of the drawing pad and Kellogg's imagination were wide enough for the characters from his book The Island of the Skog to captivate the students who watched him perform the story while illustrating it on large sheets of paper.
NEWS
October 21, 1999
Leo Lionni was a graphic artist, an economist and lecturer. He designed advertising campaigns for Ford Motor Co. at a Philadelphia agency, magazine covers for Fortune, and museum catalogues for the Museum of Modern Art. But he'll be remembered most for a career twist that came on a train trying to entertain his preschool grandchildren. Mr. Lionni, who died last week at age 89, wrote 30 children's stories, now translated into 11 languages. He won four prestigious Caldecott Honors for illustration.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Wiesner is beloved for his picture books, lavishly illustrated Caldecott Medal-winners that invite children to tumble, like Alice down the rabbit hole, into strange, sideways universes. But, a few years ago, he got a taste of the forbidden fruit, by way of an Apple store. He wandered in and was mesmerized by the iPad, with all its pinching, zooming, and swiping capabilities. And so, at age 59, the Chestnut Hill resident has ventured from the cozy confines of the children's book section to the infinite expanse of the App Store.
NEWS
November 8, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barbara Snedeker Bates, 83, an author and editor of books for children, died of pancreatic cancer Sunday at her home in Jenkintown. Mrs. Bates was the editor of more than 250 books. She wrote 11 books, including two mysteries for young adults, a book about pets, and a book about the Jewish holidays. Her son, Stephen, said that two picture books for which she wrote the text sold a quarter of a million copies and were translated into French and German. Throughout her career, she shared her knowledge of the publishing business, presenting a talk, "Adventures in Making Books," to school assemblies and speaking at colleges and book conferences.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It can bring on acute nostalgia attacks for middle-aged and even elderly Philadelphians. It's the children's department at the Free Library on Logan Square, a cozy basement room full of fascination for kids that has hardly changed a whit since the library opened in 1926. The low reading tables and chairs look the same. There's still the bronze statue of "Young Ben Franklin" draped with lost scarves, gloves and hats. Nearby is the statue of "Young Napoleon," often dressed with clothes of the season.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Creating a children's picture book is a little like casting a feature movie, according to author and illustrator Emily Arnold McCully. The author and illustrator must put together an interesting drama that draws the reader into what otherwise is simply a flat page, she said. The secret is to create a visual world the reader enters just by looking at a single page. "Children know stories long before they can read. . . . Story is central to life," said McCully, who won a 1993 Caldecott Medal for her book Mirette on a High Wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his 35 years of writing and illustrating picture books for children, Tomie dePaola has given readers some wonderfully memorable characters - not least, himself. Oh, yes, there is Strega Nona, the gentle, grandmotherly witch from the Calabria region of southern Italy who removes warts and heals headaches. And, oh, yes, there is Big Anthony, Strega Nona's scarecrow-witted helper who always makes a mess of things. Big Anthony, don't you know, has a book of his own. But the hearts of many dePaola fans will always belong to Tommy, the chubby-cheeked boy with the unruly mop of brown hair who represents the artist as a young child.
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TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Name: KidsTravel Books.com. What it does: You can browse children's books from all over the world to learn about other cultures, prepare for a trip, read book reviews and author interviews, get family travel tips, and more. What's hot : The depth of global coverage on Kids TravelBooks is unexpected and comprehensive, with books arranged by continent and country. I want to go to the Dominican Republic, but I'm not quite ready to book a flight. I wondered if it had any kids' books on it, clicked the link, and found four books that I could buy that might help me make a decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Wiesner is beloved for his picture books, lavishly illustrated Caldecott Medal-winners that invite children to tumble, like Alice down the rabbit hole, into strange, sideways universes. But, a few years ago, he got a taste of the forbidden fruit, by way of an Apple store. He wandered in and was mesmerized by the iPad, with all its pinching, zooming, and swiping capabilities. And so, at age 59, the Chestnut Hill resident has ventured from the cozy confines of the children's book section to the infinite expanse of the App Store.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For a rare-book aficionado interested in seeing the tiny handmade dummy books Maurice Sendak fashioned to try out ideas, or for a casual fan curious about the Sendak inside jokes that appeared in early versions of well-known books before disappearing on the way to the publisher, the best place to go for decades has been 2008 Delancey Place in Philadelphia. It has been, in fact, the only place to see a great many specific items that Sendak began placing at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, a treasure house of literary rarities, in 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The picture book Tea for Ruby is transformed into a stage production by the Metropolitan Ballet Company on Saturday and Sunday at Abington Friends School's Josephine Muller Auditorium. Children can also have a queen's tea with the book's New York Times best-selling illustrator, Robin Preiss Glasser. Ruby is having trouble learning good manners, but she is determined to succeed. She receives a surprise invitation to have tea with the queen at the palace and works hard to learn etiquette befitting a princess.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Rachel Simpson loves to read to her two children - 5-year-old Rebecca and 5-month-old Benjamin - but she steers clear of nursery rhymes. "They are scary," said the Cherry Hill mom. Hansel and Gretel get pushed into the oven; the three little pigs are hunted by the big, bad wolf. "I prefer stories that teach a lesson but aren't scary or violent while they're doing it. " Jessie Menken, owner of children's store Ali's Wagon in Fairmount, doesn't read nursery rhymes to her kids, either.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was 8 or 9, in the 1960s, Jen Bryant learned to type by copying obituary material on the desk of her father, a Flemington, N.J., undertaker. In 2004, having already published more than a dozen books, she happened on a painting at the Brandywine River Museum by Horace Pippin, the late African American artist from West Chester. Bookend events. From her first childhood taste of writing to her latest children's book, A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin, published by Alfred A. Knopf in January.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Mosier
For authors these days, socializing is a sales tool - though on a Friday night, most of us are more likely to be at home mingling on social media than out at an actual party. But here we are in Haverford, at Children's Book World's 21st annual Celebration of Local Authors and Illustrators - dressed up, sipping wine, and shopping for each other's books before the beloved store's loyal customers arrive. I'm balancing Beth Kephart's Small Damages and David Wiesner's The Three Pigs , favorite books by writers whose work I admired before we met here and became friends.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Jen Saemann's first customer Monday night was an alligator. Swaddled in toothy, green plush, 21-month-old Joseph Rayner grabbed a book titled Pooh's Summer Song from the card table Saemann had set up along East Gordon Street in Kensington, where a novel Halloween tradition unfolds. Miguel Santiago, 8, in camouflage face paint, dropped his weapon and picked up a volume of Captain Underpants . "This is a good idea," pronounced Bunnie Harris, who was chaperoning the early trick-or-treaters.
NEWS
November 1, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
Jen Saemann's first customer Monday night was an alligator. Swaddled in toothy green plush, 21-month-old Joseph Rayner grabbed a book titled Pooh's Summer Song from the card table Saemann had set up along East Gordon Street in Kensington, where a novel Halloween tradition is taking root. Miquel Santiago, an 8-year-old in camouflage face paint, dropped his weapon and picked up a volume of Captain Underpants. "This is a good idea," pronounced Bunnie Harris, who was chaperoning the early trick-or-treaters.
NEWS
April 10, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who was first to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel? What makes David Foster Wallace an important author? Why is Tina Fey funny? These are just a few of the burning literary questions organizers promise will be answered this week at the fifth Philadelphia Book Festival, which will feature readings, book-signings, and chats with more than 60 authors, plus musical performances, children's workshops, a Harry Potter film festival, a...
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