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NEWS
May 11, 2004
WASHINGTON is now in the middle of one of its favorite games: Should It Show and Tell? The playing pieces: a new round of pictures and videos of atrocities committed by U.S. troops on Iraqi prisoners. Should the images be released to the public or kept hidden for fear of further inciting Arab anger? President Bush may make the final determination. Much of this game is based on make-believe. In this case, several Pentagon officials and their supporters on Capitol Hill are make-believing that these pictures - which have been passed along among troops and even used as screensavers on military computers - will somehow not end up in the hands of the media or some Web site somewhere.
LIVING
April 25, 2003 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're hung up about what to hang on your walls, put down your hammer and nails and flip through a new book. Decorating With Style (Clarkson Potter, $35) is by Stephanie Hoppen, a London print and fine-art dealer whose shop is famous as a masterpiece of display. The book covers a number of subjects - curtains, tabletops, fireplaces - but its strength is picture-hanging. Hoppen is enormously clever at taking one unassuming image - a vintage print of a sofa, for instance - and hanging it with images of chairs and interiors.
NEWS
August 15, 2010
DogMeetsWorld.org has little to do with dogs and everything to do with making children happy around the world - through photography. What's not: The cost. Participants, who are provided with the stuffed dog, make a $30 donation and need to buy a portable printer. But it's free to go to the website and view the photos. - Jen Leo, Los Angeles Times
SPORTS
June 12, 2009 | By Andy Martino INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jayson Werth has an explanation for his improved performance of late: more photographs. "When I'm seeing the ball well, it's almost like taking 1,000 still pictures of the ball from the time it is pitched to the time it gets to the plate," he said. "When I'm not seeing the ball well, it's like two pictures. " After a slump in which he admitted to feeling "totally lost," the Phillies rightfielder began last night batting .303 (10 for 33) in the first nine games of a 10-game road trip.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Inquirer has won three awards in the 45th annual Pictures of the Year competition at the University of Missouri. David Griffin, art director of The Inquirer Sunday Magazine, won in the category of feature story picture editing. Griffin and three other Inquirer photo editors - Tom Gralish, Bert Fox and Larry Price - won for newspaper-produced magazine picture editing. The Inquirer Neighbors sections won first place in the category "best use of photographs by a newspaper - zoned edition.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Try St. Joseph's University Gallery on the Lower Merion side of City Line Avenue near the new pedestrian bridge overpass. Blaise Tobia's photographs star there in his first solo show in our region. These pictures are mostly about our basic experiences of city life with its rational enough buildings and artifacts and its unreasonable emotions. Pictures based on emotionally loaded memories often have an oddly insistent intimacy that underscores their natural poignance. Tobia, who is in his sixth year teaching photography at Drexel University, travels back and forth between his Old City residence and his home in Brooklyn.
NEWS
February 6, 2002 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
It is, at bottom, an argument about pictures and words. The pictures are of captured al-Qaeda terrorists, hooded, shackled and kneeling. The words are unlawful combatants, the U.S. government's preferred term for the men it has interned on a military base in Cuba. Together, words and pictures have inflamed an international debate. Human-rights groups have accused the United States of treating the detainees inhumanely. Even America's staunchest ally, Britain, has registered rumblings of concern.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lester Lee Weiss, a solid landmark in Lawndale's business community, is going to retire. But don't let anybody tell you he's quitting work. After 42 years of selling clothes out of Weiss' Kiddie Shop, 6427 Rising Sun Ave., he has no intention of just handing over the keys and walking out. "The young fellow who's buying the store hasn't been in the business," Weiss said. "I've agreed to stick around and lend a hand, to break him in. " The details are still a little loose, but Weiss, 70, expects to begin work as a "consultant" to his replacement, a 26-year-old entrepreneur, late this month or early in March.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sexually inappropriate pictures circulated by students at Neshaminy High School prompted a police investigation Friday, authorities said. School officials and law enforcement were still determining whether any students were depicted in the pictures and how widely the pictures were shared. "It's a large number of students," district spokesman Chris Stanley said Friday night. "It's not just one or two. " He estimated that as many as 20 students among the school's 2,540 could have received the pictures, but said it was possible the investigation could reveal the number was more or less.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 27, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jurassic World is helping Comcast Corp.-owned Universal Pictures devour box-office records like a T. rex. The futuristic franchise reboot barreled to $1 billion in a record-setting 13 days this month and could surpass $1.5 billion before it fades to extinction on the big screen, movie-industry observers say. Though it's only June, the Hollywood studio says it already has set an all-time record for annual gross receipts - $3.8 billion through...
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
No American professional sport is more obviously wrapped in nonathletic businesses than auto racing. That's why NASCAR - and especially this weekend - is important for Philadelphia-based Axalta Coating Systems. Axalta makes paint in thousands of colors and formulas for cars, trucks, buses, and industrial fixtures. It sells business-to-business, working through distributors, big body-shop groups, and automakers in 130 countries, generating first-quarter revenue of close to $1 billion.
NEWS
April 14, 2015
"TOO BIG to fail" describes the notion that a business is so large and important to the economy that government must do anything to prevent its failure. That term gained currency during the banking debacle that led to the Great Recession. If you were a victim, "too big to fail" carries a promise of protection that suggests that some companies are, in fact, too big to question. One bright spot in the post-recession era is that more big companies are being subject to greater scrutiny and questions.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MEMBERS OF Philadelphia's arts community were singing, dancing and even playing the violin at City Hall yesterday - but they weren't celebrating. Instead, they were trying to bring attention to the fact that Mayor Nutter's budget proposal for the fiscal year beginning July 1 contains a 40 percent reduction to the budget of the Philadelphia Cultural Fund. The fund, a nonprofit corporation established by the city in 1991 to award city-funded grants to art organizations, is in line to receive $1.84 million for fiscal year 2016, or $1.3 million less than it received in the current-year budget of $3.14 million.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Labor Department jobs reports are glowing - unemployment down to 5.5 percent last month and a robust 295,000 jobs added to the nation's payrolls. Even in the Philadelphia suburbs, the latest figures show the rate even lower, at 5 percent. But why, if everything is so good, are monthly sessions packed at My Career Transitions, a local networking group of volunteers who help people looking for work? "It's not as rosy as the numbers indicate," said Michael Hughes. "I see new faces every month.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
It's unlikely any young married couples with babies and toddlers live in the perfect serenity that Jessica Todd Harper summons in "The Home Stage," a series of large, luminous color photographs of herself and her family that is currently on view at the Print Center. It's doubtful that Harper believes in her contrived narratives, either, but she doesn't quite give it away. That would spoil the fun. Harper's gentle, WASPy images of parents, children, and grandparents at home together, illuminated only by available daylight, suggest earlier centuries, and domestic scenes more likely to have been captured on canvas than with a camera lens.
SPORTS
March 6, 2015
NOW THAT Major League Soccer and the MLS Players Union have avoided a strike by agreeing in principle to a new, 5-year collective bargaining agreement, Union coach Jim Curtin can zero in on what he has tried to get in focus since the team opened training camp. "There was a little bit of a buzz in practice and a sense of release," Curtin said yesterday on a media conference call before the Union opens the season tomorrow at PPL Park. "Our focus has always been, since the preseason started, on March 7 against Colorado.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015
The showbiz saga "Birdman" won the Academy Award for Best Picture, and four Oscars in all. It was a big night for "Birdman" the story of a has-been Hollywood actor mounting a Broadway comeback. The movie also won awards for directing, writing and cinematography. Julianne Moore won Best Actress for "Still Alice," the story of a woman succumbing to Alzheimers Disease. She was a popular pick, and won an enthusiastic standing ovation. "They say winning an Oscar will allow you to live five years longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Marky Ramone wasn't an original member of the Ramones. But the drummer, born Marc Bell, was on board with the fast, furious, and mightily influential punk-rock band by its fourth album - the 1978 classic Road to Ruin . That began a 11/2-decade, black-leather-jacket run with the New York masters of breakneck minimalism, whom Spin magazine once voted the second greatest band of all time. Now, Marky is telling the band's story - as well as the tale of his own pre-Ramones years in the 1970s CBGB scene - in his memoir Punk Rock Blitzkrieg: My Life as a Ramone (Touchstone, $28)
SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once you find the plain green door marked "maintenance" inside Camden Catholic, you can't miss the aura of the school's wrestling program. Inside the door and down a stairwell, the steps lead to a wall that reads, "You are walking the green mile . . . pathway to the House of Pain. " If you continue on the green-painted floors and avoid the spare wrestling mats in the hallway, you'll eventually reach the gym. The pictures of seven state champions grace one wall. An opposite wall is covered with 18 pictures of past Region 7 champions.
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