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NEWS
December 17, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The men who repeatedly raped a 25-year-old woman, killed a man and wounded another in a rampage last year took pictures of each other, posing with their shotguns during the episode. "The pictures were meant to be a trophy of their adventure," said Assistant District Attorney Michael McGovern. "This type of barbaric, brutal conduct is difficult to understand. " Most of the photos were destroyed, but one was available for use at the trial of six men before Common Pleas Judge Carolyn E. Temin.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Is it unreasonable for my expecting wife and me to ask her family not to post pictures of our baby on Facebook once he's here? We are learning more and more every day, nothing is truly private, and in 20 years, our son may not want his baby pictures all over the Internet; we want him to make the choice himself when he's old enough. In addition, we don't want a corporation to be able to use his image without asking, and especially in the case of my much younger sister-in-law, who friends people she doesn't know, we don't want potential predators to have access to our baby's face and information.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
Let us now defend Meredith Vieira. The talented correspondent on CBS News' "West 57th" is being pilloried, vilified and excoriated because she posed for sexy pictures in Esquire magazine. The pictures are accompanied by a semi-facetious gush note which acclaims Vieira for her journalistic skills and professional prowess as well as for her appearance. It ends, jokingly, "Baby, baby, gimme some news!" Who wrote that? Little ol' me. I thought people would sense its strain of parody.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Immediately after Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans and long-time residents of Japanese ancestry on the West Coast were assumed to be potentially disloyal. They were rounded up by the government and shipped first to temporary "assembly centers" and then to "relocation centers" in isolated western areas. Euphemism can't conceal the fact that these "relocation centers" were concentration camps and that the approximately 110,000 deportees were prisoners - in most cases of their own government.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was one of many pictures Gertrude Hopkins took while on vacation in San Francisco. A couple of cable cars inching their way up a street to picture-perfect houses, leaving the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz in the distance. But for the 83-year-old painter, it was more than a picture. It was another scene to decorate Phoenixville Hospital. "It's for the patients," Hopkins said about her paintings. "But the staff gets a kick out of it, too, because they'll come by and say, 'That's nice.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If a picture is worth a thousand words, think of how many words there must be in English teacher Madeleine Weidel's classroom at Lenape High School. Although Weidel has her students hone their writing skills each day on the 15 computers in the classroom, she also encourages them to use those computers in another way - to take and develop pictures. "Computers let us bring words and pictures together," Weidel said. "It's all part of our efforts to integrate technology in all fields, from business to English.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Anyone who's ever been sightseeing knows that these days it's no longer good enough to just see the sight. You have to capture the image, take it home with you, get it developed, then try to figure out what your little finger is doing on top of the Eiffel Tower. For the last decade or so, tourists and their cameras have been as inseparable as yuppies and their humidors, whether they spring for a $10,000 set-up with a lens the size of Arizona or a $15 disposable number with an attached rubber band so they can wear the thing fashionably on their wrist.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sometimes a great idea can hit you right in the face. That is what happened to Lori A. Frost, co-inventor of the Picture-Exchange Communication System. Frost was working as a speech pathologist with severely handicapped children when she realized traditional communication methods did not always work. "I was told by a school staff member to have an autistic child stuff envelopes. I handed her the envelopes, and she punched me in the nose," Frost said. "I realized that she had never learned to communicate, 'No, thank you.' Without that skill, she had no control of the situation.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Bob Dole visited this Republican stronghold for an April 15 tax-cutting rally, a plainclothes Haverford Township police detective took photographs of local politicians and business owners as they met him. Two detectives spent two work days enlarging and printing about 150 of the black-and-white pictures in the police station's darkroom, according to police sources who requested anonymity. Local Republican leaders then distributed the pictures as mementos to those who had posed with the GOP presidential nominee-to-be.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By BARRIE MAGUIRE
Imagine that you are visiting your mother's house and you're poking around up in the attic when you come across a dusty shoe box tucked under the eaves, a box you don't remember from earlier forays into your past. Curious, you open the box to find that is filled with sheets of yellowing stationery, each sheet covered with your grandmother's distinctive handwriting. As you take out the top leaf you can almost hear her distant, quavering voice, but when you begin to read you recognize immediately that these words are written in the voice of a younger woman.
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