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NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE LATEST young man to accuse a Philadelphia Catholic priest of molesting him as an altar boy told a jury yesterday that the experience so badly shocked, embarrassed and debilitated him that he turned to drugs, alcohol and multiple suicide attempts before reaching his teens. The slim man, dressed in a white shirt, black tie and slacks, emotionally spoke of being 10 years old in 1997 when the Rev. Andrew McCormick invited him to the priest's rectory bedroom at St. John Cantius Church in Bridesburg.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S AN ALLURING concept. It is the chance for a city to show its best side; a chance for a franchise to host its bully-boy peers. The Eagles are approaching the finish of their $125 million facelift at 10-year-old Lincoln Financial Field. They announced yesterday a partnership with Panasonic that will bring a new meaning to watching a game at the Linc - and might help lure the biggest game of all. They will spend $25 million on audio-visual upgrades that include high-definition video boards in each end zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a few months last fall, Hannah Price was famous. More precisely, she was Internet famous. In October, the website the Morning News posted a feature on "City of Brotherly Love," a series of photographs Price, 27, had taken of men who catcalled her after she moved to Philadelphia in 2009. Only the site displayed Price's ambiguously titled works under a more pointed, but click-catching, headline: "My Harassers. " Online news outlets from Slate to Jezebel to Buzzfeed took the bait.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
When is art an asset? When it provides future benefit, and when you sell your art and make money. Financial advisors are taking note of the bull market in art. In December, a Francis Bacon painting, Three Studies of Lucian Freud , sold for $142 million, the most expensive artwork at auction. Freeman's auction house in Center City will host a panel of art and tax experts on Thursday, including Antiques Roadshow appraisers Alasdair Nichol and Scott Isdaner, managing member of Isdaner & Company CPAs.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
YOU HAVE to wonder about any place that would have a picture of me hanging on one of its storied walls. A much younger picture of me. Just for doing my job. The truth is, I probably should have paid for the privilege. I didn't really know much about the soul of the Palestra until I started covering college basketball games there. You can only get so much as a kid watching on TV. But to be even a small part of it was totally my pleasure. And honor. I'm sure the many colleagues who share that piece of history with me would heartily concur.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many people think they know her. Elizabeth Haddon Estaugh was the plucky single Quaker woman who left England for America in 1701 to manage her father's property holdings in New Jersey - and who almost single-handedly founded Haddonfield. She comforted Native Americans when they had "gotten strong liquor in their heads," legend says. She proposed to her preacher husband and was too frail and tiny to have her own children. But don't believe the stories - at least not all of them.
NEWS
November 27, 2013
HERBERT EGERT couldn't wait for the fixes to the health exchange in his home state of Maryland. Egert, the managing partner of Affinity Dental Associates, renewed with his current health-care provider at a significant increase in rates. Egert's practice provides health insurance to employees who work at least 24 hours a week. The insurer covering his employees offered to renew the contract, which ends in March, by the end of December at a 32 percent increase. Egert wanted to wait to see what the exchanges had to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The picture book Tea for Ruby is transformed into a stage production by the Metropolitan Ballet Company on Saturday and Sunday at Abington Friends School's Josephine Muller Auditorium. Children can also have a queen's tea with the book's New York Times best-selling illustrator, Robin Preiss Glasser. Ruby is having trouble learning good manners, but she is determined to succeed. She receives a surprise invitation to have tea with the queen at the palace and works hard to learn etiquette befitting a princess.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Gabriel Rosado said he was bored last week sitting in his Roxborough living room. Saturday night's middleweight title fight with Peter Quillin was still a week away. So Rosado found a piece of scrap paper and drew. It was something he often did as a teenager living in North Philadelphia. With a black ballpoint pen, Rosado etched himself wearing a crown - his nickname is "King" - and holding his hands high above his head. His stick-figure opponent lay flat on the mat, wearing a frown as the crowd cheered.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ON MAY 13, 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb on a West Philly rowhouse. Eleven people died and 61 homes went up in flames. Within a week, then-Mayor Wilson Goode agreed to appoint an independent commission to investigate exactly how and why the Police Department's final confrontation with the MOVE fringe group escalated to catastrophe. It has been four months and 19 days since the collapse of 2140 Market St. killed six people and injured 13. So far, all we have is the promise that Mayor Nutter will appoint a similar independent commission to examine how the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections might have averted the tragedy.
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