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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday's attempted pieing of Rupert Murdoch during his testimony to the House of Commons was an outrage. As it was meant to be. It was also a failure. The assailant, stand-up comic Jonathan May-Bowles, or "Jonnie Marbles," got more shaving cream on himself than on Murdoch. He was restrained by bystanders, including Murdoch's wife, Wendi Deng, who has emerged a heroine, a stand-up woman. May-Bowles has emerged with shaving cream on his face. (He was charged Wednesday with "behavior causing harassment, alarm or distress in a public place.
FOOD
November 14, 1990 | By Deborah Licklider, Daily News Staff Writer
If you want to serve a memorable Thanksgiving dinner, but are afraid of breaking with tradition, get creative with dessert. Purists may demand a token pumpkin pie, but experimentation is more likely to be tolerated at the meal's finale than it is if you start messing around with the main course. Most families want, indeed demand, turkey, sweet potatoes, stuffing, cranberries, etc. And while they may put up with one exotic vegetable dish, there's likely to be a mutiny if you try substituting couscous for cornbread stuffing, or kumquats for cranberries.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | by George W. Bush
This is a poem made of quotations from George W. Bush. They have been arranged, for aesthetic reasons only, by Washington Post writer Richard Thompson. I think we all agree, the past is over. This is still a dangerous world. It's a world of madmen and uncertainty and potential mental losses. Rarely is the question asked: Is our children learning? Will the highways of the Internet become more few? How many hands have I shaked? They misunderestimate me. I am a pitbull on the pantleg of opportunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It was a recent tour of Pennsylvania Dutch (which is to say, German) household objects at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, chiefly a wall of 200-year-old fired-clay pie plates, that put me in mind of sharp-tongued Verna Dietrich. The guide had taken care to note that these particular plates, etched with tulips and stags and Prussian-ish double-headed birds, were show pieces, most likely delivered with a pie on board, but not used in their daily baking. The more utilitarian pieces typically didn't last: Pennsylvania's early German settlers were so smitten with pie - with the bountiful fruit trees and farms of their own - that they could apparently down a pie or two with every meal.
SPORTS
May 1, 1993 | By Frank Dolson, INQUIRER SPORTS EDITOR
How loose are these Phils? Loose enough that Pete Incaviglia, sitting in front of the dugout for a television interview, was the victim of a sneak, pie-in-the-face attack by Curt Schilling before last night's game. Schilling tiptoed from behind and - splat! Boys will be boys, especially when they're leading the league. Still, Incaviglia had plenty to be happy about. He could raise his right arm again, the stiffness resulting from his Wednesday night collision with Mickey Morandini having disappeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over at the Society Hill Playhouse the other night, Tom Tansey had his lines memorized. They were not many, but his role was a critical one. "This is your ticket for the show," he said, with a practiced cadence, adding quickly: "We're not quite done with you yet. " Then the narrative turn: "This is your ticket for your pie, which you can get right behind me. " And the denouement: "This is your ticket for your pint, which you can...
FOOD
May 18, 1994 | By Johnny Lerro, FOR THE INQUIRER
This spring, a nice Key lime pie would really hit the spot. To make Key lime pie, you'll need some Key limes. As the name would suggest, this citrus fruit is grown in the Florida Keys, as well as in Mexico and the rest of the Caribbean. In fact, the production of Key lime juice is the major industry on the small island of Dominica. There are at least eight factories that extract Key lime juice and export it to England, where it is bottled by I. Rose & Co. as the world-famous Rose's Lime juice.
FOOD
November 19, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Watch the squirrels, fat as cats, cramming in one more calorie, searching out the last acorn, hoarding before the onslaught of winter. Seeds, grains, even a scrap of bark will do in a pinch, but the real prize is a nut. A walnut, chestnut, acorn or filbert, packed with protein, starchy sweet and rich with the most fragrant oils in nature. Nuts are treasure chests of flavor and nutrition. We're doing it, too - stockpiling reserves in the larder and a few extra pounds 'round the middle before winter hits.
FOOD
November 19, 2009 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
Every year the pumpkin parade arrives earlier - before Labor Day, even, the fluffy pumpkin lattes and baseball mitt-size pumpkin muffins emerge on cue from behind coffee bar counters. Limited-edition pumpkin ales follow, along with sweet-smelling doughnuts and seasonally confusing ice creams. And before long, chunky cans of purees are lining supermarket aisle-end displays, seductively promising smooth-as-silk pies. Yet for all of our pumpkin fetishizing, we tend to take this humble cucurbit for granted, forgetting that it is also real food.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Oscar de la Renta took a pie in the face from an animal-rights activist last week as he did a promotional appearance for his perfume line at a store outside Portland, Ore. "Shame on you for using fur," shouted Alison Green as she smashed the designer's face with a tofu cream pie. A police spokesman, who said Green may be cited for disorderly conduct, said de la Renta "cleaned up and came right back and continued signing autographs. " STEWART PORT The Los Angeles board of supervisors Wednesday voted to rename Los Angeles International Aiport after the late actor Jimmy Stewart.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News
FLAG SHORTBREAD COOKIES If you want extra-fancy, dip the backs of these babies in melted bittersweet dark chocolate. 12 ounces unsalted butter, softened 1 cup 10X sugar 3 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Red and blue colored sugars Combine butter and 10X sugar. Stir in flour, salt and vanilla. Mix thoroughly. Chill. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll and cut dough into rectangular shapes, or press in a shortbread mold.
NEWS
June 21, 2015
Summer is always ripe for cherry pie. But this year, I'm excited about the one that's pouring on draft: Cherry Pie, the cider. This wickedly good blush of sweet-tart dry cider comes from Stone & Key Cellars in Montgomeryville, the eight-month-old custom crush winery from the owners of Keystone Homebrew Supply that's also become one of the state's innovative new cideries. S&K's initial cider series ferments a blend of up to 17 apple varieties from Solebury Orchards to complete dryness followed by a variety of vivid finishes, including a funky wild yeast for "Untamed," or the oaky vanilla of brandy barrels.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deal in Washington Township between elected officials and school leaders may help temper opposition to a housing and commercial project initiated seven years ago. The township council approved a measure Wednesday to allocate 44 percent of the revenue from a proposed tax agreement for the Washington Square redevelopment project to the school district. Resistance to the project from residents and school officials has centered on concerns that the planned housing components and a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT)
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR CITY, N.J. - You may not be in the market for a pie or a poinsettia on any given day. But step through the threshold at Angelo's Farm Market - one of the few remaining roadside produce stands once so prolific along the major routes to the Jersey Shore - and most likely you'll covet at least one or the other. Or maybe even a fancifully flocked Christmas tree or wreath. There is a certain something about the farm market along Route 30 where they have been selling locally grown produce, shrubbery, and plants for 70 summers and offering Christmas greenery and pies for sale since the 1960s.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Valerie Erwin started cooking at age 8, absorbing Southern traditions from family, especially a mother raised in Charleston, S.C., and a father from Savannah, Ga. And though her culinary repertoire grew in variety and sophistication over the decades, that early Southern influence is with her still. In 2003, Erwin became owner/chef of Geechee Girl Rice Cafe, originally in Germantown, now in Mount Airy. The name refers to the wildly diverse culture that grew up around West African slaves on rice plantations along the southeastern Atlantic coastline.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THE FOURTH annual Harvest on Henry event last month was no pie-in-the-sky venture. It raised $13,000 to support the educational agricultural opportunities at Henry Got Crops CSA, a community-supported agriculture partnership between Saul High School, Weavers Way Food Co-op, Weavers Way Community Programs and Fairmount Park. The daylong festival gave Saul students a chance to interact with the public and featured farm-inspired activities, such as hay rides, pumpkin crafts and - to show off students' cooking skills - a pie-baking contest.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY NOELLE CARTER, Los Angeles Times
IT'S OFFICIALLY fall. And for many, the seasonal change has nothing to do with the weather or a date on the calendar. Fall arrives when Starbucks is once again offering Pumpkin Spice Latte. Never mind that the iconic latte doesn't contain any pumpkin. The signature flavoring is all in the spice blend. And it works. Starbucks has sold more than 200 million of the drinks since its introduction in 2003. The exact blend varies. Cinnamon. Nutmeg. Ginger. Allspice. Perhaps a little clove.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
THE LANCASTER Avenue Redevelopment Corp. talked a good game when tax dollars were up for grabs. In applications for state grants, the Overbrook-based nonprofit outlined its plans to revitalize the raggedy commercial corridor between 52nd and 63rd streets, reduce blight, provide housing support to seniors, settle school conflicts, build homes, create jobs and re-establish Lancaster Avenue as an "important gateway" in Philadelphia. LARC set up shop on 61st Street, and the money flowed - about $2 million in state and city funds.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THREE years ago, Roxborough resident Sam Finney combined his interest in cooking and building. The result was a backyard, wood-burning brick oven. "I was in Maine where I experienced an outdoor wood oven firsthand and I thought it was fantastic," Finney said. The project began with research and the book The Bread Builders: Hearth Loaves and Masonry Ovens , by Daniel Wing and Alan Scott, detailing the history of both ovens and bread-baking. When construction of the structure began, it was six weeks of intense work to build the 2 1/2- by 4-foot oven on a 6-by-7-foot slab.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
COUNCIL President Darrell Clarke's mysterious "bold vision" is starting to come into focus. Joined by labor and development leaders and Council colleagues, Clarke unveiled a plan yesterday to build 1,500 affordable-housing units in gentrifying neighborhoods by redeveloping city-owned vacant land or tax-delinquent properties. "We thought it was very important to move very aggressively in those neighborhoods because if we don't, there would be no opportunity to continue to have affordability," Clarke said.
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