FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's bustling waterfront, where throngs of revelers dance, drink and dine nightly on piers older than their ancestors: Are the piers safe? The question got a tragic answer last night when the end of Pier 34 collapsed into the Delaware River, killing at least three people and injuring scores of others. The age of the pier could not be determined last night, but the stretch of the Delaware where it is situated was a bustling seaport through the time of World War II. James Cuorato, executive vice president of the Penn's Landing Corp.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Mix 750 tons of trucked-in sand, the world's best professional beach volleyball players and $65,000 in prize money on a hot Philadelphia Saturday and Sunday, and you get the Miller Lite Open on Pier 42 North by the Delaware River - those of you who didn't go to the shore and play some version of the game yourselves. Twenty-six two-person teams, including two local ones chosen in a qualifying tournament last weekend at the Jersey shore, and top 1990 pro money-winners Sinjin Smith and Randy Stoklos, spiked, dinked and konged before a gallery of appropriately attired fans.
REAL_ESTATE
September 7, 1986 | By Gene Austin, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
If real estate developers have their way, Philadelphia's Delaware River waterfront and some unused piers in the Penn's Landing area will become a thriving community of homes, offices, stores, restaurants and entertainment facilities. For the moment, however, one formerly broken-down pier stands out as a pace-setter. Pier 3, on Delaware Avenue between Market and Arch Streets, is no longer a plan or a dream - it sparkles with new paint, freshly cleaned bricks and tiers of upscale apartments.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | by Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
Details on last week's deadly collapse of Pier 34 and the nightclub Heat will remain an official secret for now. The mayor's office agreed yesterday to withhold investigators' findings until a special grand jury decides the fate of pier owner Michael Asbell and club owner Eli Karetny. Three women died and more than 30 people were injured May 18 when the pier plunged into the Delaware River, taking part of the new, open-air club with it. The collapse came just two days after divers, hired by the Columbus Avenue club to check a newly sprouted, widening crack near its entrance, inspected the pier and declared it unstable.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By MARILYN JORDAN TAYLOR
A one-acre pier-park opening on the Delaware last week might not sound like a big deal, but it packs a wallop for changing our Central Delaware Riverfront from an overlooked backwater into the front door to our city and region. The pier, formerly a commercial shipping berth that recently served as a parking lot, is an early project in our effort to develop the Central Delaware into a welcoming urban place with continuous connections to the city's renowned, dense, walkable downtown.
NEWS
July 3, 2007
RE THE PIER 34/Karetny and Asbell sentencing matter: Imagine an average person trying to feed three or four children on a just-get-by job. At tax time, he adds a fictitious dependent, doesn't report a capital gain, takes a phony deduction. (And don't let this person be a female single parent: Here comes welfare fraud.) Crime is like a child. Starts off small, then grows. White-collar crimes, lots of times considered lesser crimes, are committed out of greed, yet they take premeditation.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Robert McSherry and Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
An oil-laden barge hit a pier Wednesday at the Port of Wilmington, causing the pier to collapse about 20 hours later and spill about 10,000 gallons of oil into the Christina and Delaware Rivers, authorities said yesterday. Coast Guard officers said that about 300 gallons of toxic gasoline additives also leaked into the rivers about 10 p.m. Wednesday as the pier on the Christina River sank, rupturing pipes used to convey petroleum products from barges to land-based storage tanks.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By Jonathan Sidener, Special to The Inquirer
A Delanco warehousing firm, Distributec Inc., faces strong local opposition to its plans to build what would become Burlington County's only deepwater pier. More than 100 township residents jammed the township hall for a public hearing on the proposal held by the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) on April 25. Residents filled all the seats and aisles; others were left standing outside, prompting officials to interrupt the meeting and relocate it to the Walnut Avenue School.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Before even one boatload of city incinerator ash could be shipped to Panama as planned, a temporary restraining order has halted the stream of some 35 trucks per day that has been bringing the controversial black residue to a shipping pier at Delaware Avenue and Reed Street. Yesterday's order by Common Pleas Judge Nelson Diaz means the city will go back to piling up the ash at the Northwest Incinerator in Roxborough, a practice it stopped recently after years of protests by neighbors.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Before even one boatload of city incinerator ash could be shipped to Panama as planned, a temporary restraining order has halted the stream of some 35 trucks per day that has been bringing the controversial black residue to a shipping pier at Delaware Avenue and Reed Street. Yesterday's order by Common Pleas Judge Nelson Diaz means the city will go back to piling up the ash at the Northwest Incinerator in Roxborough, a practice it stopped recently after years of protests by neighbors.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jefferson Apartment Group and Haverford Properties have been selected to develop the riverfront property known as Festival Pier, the Delaware River Waterfront Corp., the nonprofit group that controls the site, said Friday. The partnership will build about 550 units of housing and 30,000 square feet of retail space as part of a plan that also will include ample public space at the site, near the intersection of Spring Garden Street and Columbus Boulevard-Delaware Avenue, the DRWC said in a statement.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jefferson Apartment Group and Haverford Properties Inc. are apparently close to being chosen as a team to develop the Festival Pier site on the Delaware River, among the most ambitious revitalization initiatives on Philadelphia's eastern waterfront. Jefferson Apartment senior vice president Drew Chapman said his team, which has been assisted by architect Cecil Baker, will present its proposal for the site Friday to Delaware River Waterfront Corp.'s board of directors. The appearance marks the culmination of a selection process that began in February, when the DRWC published its guidelines for the site's transformation into a mixed-use residential district with ample public space.
NEWS
October 13, 2015
ISSUE | FORFEITURE LAW Drug dealers should not be protected Although State Rep. Jim Cox's legislation is well-intentioned and is not intended to hurt law enforcement, it would protect drug dealers and their illegally gotten profits ("Forfeiture law needs reform," Sept. 30). Under this bill, a drug dealer who becomes a fugitive keeps his illegal drug money. When a dealer dies before trial, the illegal money goes to his next of kin. When he thwarts a conviction by intimidating a witness, he keeps his drug money and property.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Weeks after the hip-hop-heavy Made in America weekend, this year's most adventurous rap lineup sneaked into Philly while the rest of the world was concentrating on the pope's arrival: Wednesday's gig with A$AP Rocky, the madcap likes of Tyler, the Creator, and Danny Brown, and dread MC Vince Staples on Festival Pier. "We're not about fake pop [expletive]," yelled Rocky, the headliner, talking about the underground nature of the night's quartet of rappers (Rocky is signed to Sony/RCA for big money, but one man's underground is another's pocket change.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Make your way past the Port Richmond Village Shopping Center, weave underneath I-95, dodge the cars drag-racing down Beach Street, and you'll reach a locked gate. Hop over, slip around, or duck under it and you're on the well-worn path to what's known as Graffiti Pier - a postindustrial ruin, open-air art gallery, and informal park that has, in recent years, become perhaps Philadelphia's worst-kept secret.   Graffiti Pier // Philadelphia, PA from Adam Englehart on Vimeo . The 500-foot-long pier has long drawn teenagers from the River Wards to drink beer and ride dirt bikes.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look no further than the blueprints to his Rittenhouse Square mansion to glimpse the appetite and aptitude of Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein. He is building a megahouse, a gravity-defying playground as unconventional as the onetime Northeast Philadelphia rowhouse boy whose brass and vision have made him one of the city's premier wheeler-dealers. What was, for three decades, the vacant McIlhenny Mansion is now a three-story-deep hole that will hold a tennis court, glass-floored balcony and half-court basketball court.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
Bob Rose said he had tried but figured there was no shot. He and a partner book shows each summer on the Ocean City Music Pier. Before each season, he talks with city officials and residents about which acts they'd like to see. This year, someone suggested the Beach Boys. "I'm thinking, 'Yeah, right,' " Rose said. "So I talked to my partner, and he decided to pursue it, and, lo and behold, [the Beach Boys] liked the idea of playing in Ocean City. When you're pitching 'America's Greatest Family Resort,' you can't think of a better band than the Beach Boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Singer/guitarist Mike Ness started his hard-core rock-roots ensemble Social Distortion in Fullerton, Calf., in 1978. It took a dozen years to forge its first classic, their namesake major-label debut of 1990. With its cranky mix of California punk, rockabilly, tough country, and taproom rock and roll telling rotted-out stories of addiction and salvation, Ness and company formed the template for many a Social Distortion (and solo Ness) album to follow. Celebrating 25 years of Charles Bukowski barfly-esque, sauced-up sound was worth a night out Wednesday on the Festival Pier at Penn's Landing.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
VENTNOR, N.J. - Some days on the fishing pier, all you catch is a breeze, some sunburn and bloodworm guts on your pants. No matter how much you emulate the old-timers, copying their baits and mimicking their little twitches with the rod, sometimes you just haul in seaweed while "Harold the cement guy," "Father Frank" and "Kenny the cop" are killing kingfish left and right. That's why they call it "fishing, not catching," one saying goes. If that one doesn't make a flustered fisherman feel better, the regulars and ringers who can't seem to miss a fish will tell you "a day out fishing always beats a day at work" and that's hard to argue against - unless you're Lou Kanter.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A company bought a parcel beside Waterfront Square towers along the Delaware River and plans a residential development at site, the broker who handled the deal announced Monday. Michael Barmash of Colliers International said in a statement that Pier 35 1/2 - same name as the site - acquired the 2.13-acre tract from SA Group Properties on April 29. Barmash did not immediately return a phone message regarding pricing details and specifics about the buyer's plans. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
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