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Pigment

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NEWS
May 14, 2008 | By Edward J. Sozanski FOR THE INQUIRER
Robert Rauschenberg, who with contemporary Jasper Johns provoked a profound shift in 20th-century art after World War II, died Monday night at his home on Captiva Island, Fla. He was 82. According to his New York dealer, Arne Glimcher of PaceWildenstein gallery, the cause was heart failure. Beginning in the early to mid-1950s, Mr. Rauschenberg extended the vocabulary of painting, which had been more or less fixed since the Middle Ages, by combining pigment with real objects such as stuffed birds, fabrics and household appliances, and photographs reproduced from newspapers.
LIVING
August 25, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
September and October tend to be perfect for painting, especially the outside of a house. Lower humidity makes painting window and door frames easier. Interior painting is easier, too - especially if you don't have central air-conditioning. How can you tell which paint is best for your job? We assembled some pointers, with help from Debbie Zimmer at the Rohm & Haas Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. Need to know: You get what you pay for. Good-quality paint is less expensive in the long run - its superior hiding power will require fewer coats (coverage guidelines are typically found on the can)
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it "The Mystery of Oblong Blobs. " In the prevailing scientific view, they are microscopic remains of ancient pigment granules, offering clues to the colors of winged dinosaurs. But a new study by a Drexel University graduate proposes a different explanation - one that has ruffled a few academic feathers. Alison E. Moyer, now a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, says the cigar-shaped "microbodies," just one-millionth of a meter long, might simply be impressions left by very old bacteria.
SPORTS
June 9, 1989 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of New York and a public-interest law group yesterday sued the makers of lead pigment for paints, seeking more than $50 million in damages and alleging that the companies conspired for decades to conceal the product's health hazards while continuing to sell it to unsuspecting consumers. "If we have the right to demand that Exxon pay the price for cleaning up the environmental disaster in Prince William Sound, we also have the right to demand that the lead-pigment industry clean up the environmental catastrophe they have caused in buildings throughout our city and other urban areas," Mayor Edward I. Koch said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Torah - the first five books of the Old Testament - constitutes the heart of Judaism. Unlike the Christian Bible, which is commonly translated into pictures, the Torah exists for Jews as text. A pictorial Torah seems improbable until you see one, and then it looks perfectly natural. You can discover this for yourself at the Philadelphia Museum of Judaism at Congregation Rodeph Shalom, where a suite of 44 paintings by New York artist Archie Rand is on view through April 17. They're called the Chapter Paintings because the full suite represents the 54 weekly portions of the Torah (the Hebrew year has 54 weeks)
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dick Henderson is a patient man, a good thing because the art he has chosen to pursue is one that requires enormous patience - Byzantine icon painting. Henderson, 65, a retired electrical engineer for the Peco Energy Co., has almost completed his second icon, which, as he did with the first, he plans to donate to St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Radnor. Henderson's interest in iconography began about 20 years ago when, thumbing through National Geographic, he saw an article on a monastery in Greece filled with icons.
FOOD
August 15, 1990 | By Morris and James Carey, Special to the Daily News
Q. Is there a chemical available that will fade new cedar shingles to match the aged ones on a 1915 brown-shingle bungalow? Do translucent stains allow natural aging to occur? Letting them age naturally will take years, especially since the roof overhang protects some of them from the elements. I've checked every paint store and person to find an answer. If you let me know the magic chemical, I will share it with others. A. The "secret word" in your questions is aging.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Checking the skittish world economy, it's tough to read the signs when major producers can't agree: DuPont Co. scrambled Tuesday to dispute an Australia-based rival's claim that factories have stopped buying titanium dioxide, a basic industrial chemical that whitens paints, plastics, and papers. Demand for pigments made from titanium ore "has in essence gone from full steam ahead to full stop in a little over eight weeks," warned David Robb, managing director at Iluka Resources Ltd., on Monday.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | BY JODY POWELL
There is a charming lady of my acquaintance who coyly admitted some years back that she and her husband, faced with the task of reviving a moribund newspaper, had attempted to increase circulation by spreading word that their publication didn't make your hands as dirty as the competition. The claim was, shall we say, "misinformation. " Now it seems that things are afoot that could make an honest woman of her. An article in this month's Washington Journalism Review reveals that technology is well on its way to solving what is known in the trade as "rub- off. " The problem is that most newspapers are printed by a process that leaves the ink, composed of oil and a resin/pigment compound, sitting on top of the paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Museum conservators - the people who minister to sick paintings and figure out how to make them well - are well-equipped to appreciate the intricacies and eccentricities of an artist's technique. Before they can refurbish a painting, they need to find out how it was made, so that their treatment will be consistent with the artist's method and intent. It follows, then, that an exhibition organized by a painting's conservator would focus on the architecture of an artist's canvases rather than their content.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it "The Mystery of Oblong Blobs. " In the prevailing scientific view, they are microscopic remains of ancient pigment granules, offering clues to the colors of winged dinosaurs. But a new study by a Drexel University graduate proposes a different explanation - one that has ruffled a few academic feathers. Alison E. Moyer, now a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, says the cigar-shaped "microbodies," just one-millionth of a meter long, might simply be impressions left by very old bacteria.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Checking the skittish world economy, it's tough to read the signs when major producers can't agree: DuPont Co. scrambled Tuesday to dispute an Australia-based rival's claim that factories have stopped buying titanium dioxide, a basic industrial chemical that whitens paints, plastics, and papers. Demand for pigments made from titanium ore "has in essence gone from full steam ahead to full stop in a little over eight weeks," warned David Robb, managing director at Iluka Resources Ltd., on Monday.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Lenfest Plaza, created by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from a half-block of Cherry Street west of Broad, can be a cheerless place at this time of year. Not much sunlight can penetrate the breezy defile, squeezed between the Academy's Furness landmark and the taller Hamilton building. Perhaps spring and summer will soften the ambience. For now, two pieces of public art animate the plaza somewhat. At the Broad Street end, Claes Oldenburg's giant paintbrush, which serves as a signpost for the school and museum, adds a touch of color and whimsy.
NEWS
May 14, 2008 | By Edward J. Sozanski FOR THE INQUIRER
Robert Rauschenberg, who with contemporary Jasper Johns provoked a profound shift in 20th-century art after World War II, died Monday night at his home on Captiva Island, Fla. He was 82. According to his New York dealer, Arne Glimcher of PaceWildenstein gallery, the cause was heart failure. Beginning in the early to mid-1950s, Mr. Rauschenberg extended the vocabulary of painting, which had been more or less fixed since the Middle Ages, by combining pigment with real objects such as stuffed birds, fabrics and household appliances, and photographs reproduced from newspapers.
LIVING
August 25, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
September and October tend to be perfect for painting, especially the outside of a house. Lower humidity makes painting window and door frames easier. Interior painting is easier, too - especially if you don't have central air-conditioning. How can you tell which paint is best for your job? We assembled some pointers, with help from Debbie Zimmer at the Rohm & Haas Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. Need to know: You get what you pay for. Good-quality paint is less expensive in the long run - its superior hiding power will require fewer coats (coverage guidelines are typically found on the can)
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The merest fragment of one gene plays a major role in the differing skin colors of white and black people, scientists have found, capping an 11-year effort that began with the study of similar color variations in a common pet-store critter, the zebra fish. The team of 25 geneticists, molecular biologists and anthropologists, most of them from Pennsylvania State University, says the work could have implications for skin-cancer treatment, crime-scene analysis, and even cosmetics.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Neighbors of an Upper Bucks County property where 3,200 tons of toxic sludge were dumped in the late 1960s - and where investigators declared there was no health threat 20 years ago after visiting the wrong site - soon will find out if their water is threatened. The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in the next few weeks will release a "health consultation" that assesses public risk from the toxic material, which has turned up so far under the old Watson Johnson landfill on Pumping Station Road and in drinking wells.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
One pleasure of visiting galleries regularly is watching good artists get better. While the improvements are usually incremental from year to year, the increments often add up to displays of mature art-making that can be more satisfying than novelty and new faces. This month, four Center City galleries are featuring exhibitions of work that you may have seen before but that looks better this time around, perhaps because repeated exposure clarifies each artist's purpose. From west to east, they are Sande Webster, Mangel, More and Locks.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dick Henderson is a patient man, a good thing because the art he has chosen to pursue is one that requires enormous patience - Byzantine icon painting. Henderson, 65, a retired electrical engineer for the Peco Energy Co., has almost completed his second icon, which, as he did with the first, he plans to donate to St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Radnor. Henderson's interest in iconography began about 20 years ago when, thumbing through National Geographic, he saw an article on a monastery in Greece filled with icons.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The French artist Jean Dubuffet, who died in 1985 at the age of 83, was a provocative thinker and writer as well as one of the most unorthodox and influential artists this century has produced. For instance, Dubuffet, a long-time wine merchant before he became a full- time artist, once compared art to Beaujolais - he said that art should be consumed within a year after creation, before it begins to lose its "bouquet. " "What is the life expectancy of an art product?" he asked rhetorically.
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