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NEWS
February 12, 2003
GREAT news: the SUV backlash has begun. We've always disliked the fact that sports utility vehicles are so big and dangerous (consumers believe they're safe, when they're anything but) and that they guzzle gas. But now, with war looming, and our dependence on foreign oil increasingly problematic, driving an SUV today is downright unconscionable. That's why we support a recent bill introduced in Congress, by Sens. Diane Feinstein and Olympia Snowe that would raise the standards for fuel efficiency in SUVs.
NEWS
January 20, 1987
City Council President Joseph Coleman's attitude and the actions of Council in overriding the veto of the recent pension bill can be described in two words: Oink, oink. Gilbert A. Levy Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Skippack farmer John W. Hasson stood ankle-deep in mud, pumping milk into a wooden trough as his pigs, squealing and grunting, snouts quivering, climbed over each other to get to their feed. Hasson inhaled deeply. "Does that smell sour to you? That's what they call noxious fumes," he said with a sniff toward his new neighbors, Ironbridge Estates, a subdivision of two-story colonial houses costing $200,000 plus. Ironbridge's developers say Hasson's farm smells. And his 250 pigs squeal too much.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | By Cynthia Kaplan
What's the story with those French truffle pigs? If they like truffles so much, how come they don't just eat them? What's stopping them? What's stopping them from saying to those French truffle farmers, "Buzz off, monsieur, I saw it first," and then snarfing them down? I'll tell you what's stopping them. Muzzles and leashes and whaps on the snout with a knobby walking stick. That's what's stopping them. How would you like it to be your portion in life to constantly be searching for the yummiest thing you can think of, the thing you want the most, and then every time you find it, someone schleps you back with a jerk, snapping your head probably and whapping you on the nose for good measure, and then takes it for himself?
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Somebody's finally packed up Thomas Kaden's potbellied pork and taken it away. The last four members of a nine-pig family that township officials deemed a nuisance to neighbors have been removed from their quiet suburban home, Upper Dublin Zoning Officer Jesse Hayden confirmed Friday. "The roosters are still there, but the pigs are finally gone," Hayden said. "All he's got to do right now is get rid of the chickens, and we're all happy. " Upper Dublin officials filed papers in Montgomery County Court two weeks ago demanding that Kaden pay the $1,750 in fines levied against him two years ago, when a Common Pleas Court judge ruled that Kaden's pigs were illegal under zoning laws.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The one-vehicle rush-hour accident on the Route 30 bypass yesterday morning would have qualified as routine - but for the porcine passengers. State police said a tractor-trailer carrying 100-plus porkers took the ramp for Route 202 in West Whiteland Township a little too swiftly, hitting the side of the bridge and tipping onto the guardrail. Neither pigs nor people were injured. Motorists were delayed - but not hamstrung - by the 6 a.m. crash, said police, who closed the ramp for about two hours and detoured traffic to the Frazer exit, where drivers could access 202. Trooper John Hanosek said the closure was necessary so the swine could be transferred from one tractor-trailer to another, a process that strained the senses for about an hour and a half.
SPORTS
April 16, 2010 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
ALLENTOWN - The Lehigh Valley IronPigs rode three home runs Thursday night to a 4-1 victory over the Rochester Red Wings in the International League. Cody Ransom's two-run shot in the second inning provided all the runs starter Nate Bump would need. Scott Mathieson pitched two shutout innings for the save. Dewayne Wise and John Mayberry both hit solo homers in the fourth. Trenton 4, Portland 2 PORTLAND, Maine - Damon Sublett stroked a two-run homer in the top of the 11th to give the Thunder the Eastern League win. Eric Wordekemper struck out the side in the bottom of the inning to get the save.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | BY ANNA M. WARROCK, From the New York Times
All right, gentlemen, you win. Yes, you can tell me I have a real pair of knockers. While I'm typing your memos, you can describe to me what sexual acts you'd like to watch or perform and with what implements. Go ahead, play professional sports, and take out a beauty queen. But don't bother to listen to her; threaten her until she listens to you. You are men, it's your world, you can be president and we can't, so why complain? Give me another understanding editorial about how the victim, the poor victim, needs support, needs to be heard.
NEWS
December 7, 1996
On permanent replay deep in every psyche are phrases like: Clean up your room! Cut the lawn! Stop that noise! And our favorite: Have you made up your bed? Nagging may be the reason we don't all live like pigs. But it's no fun to listen to - or to deliver. Now, thanks to the creative divorced mother of a lethargic 11-year-old, parents have a new tool to shift kids from idle into overdrive - while saving their breath, except to say "Oh, sweetie, your room looks lovely!" Under the name Harper - for "harping" rather than "nagging" - Rowena Starling of Berkeley, Calif.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based food-service giant Aramark said Tuesday that it would eliminate the use of all pork from animals bred using gestation crates in its U.S. supply chain by 2017. In announcing the plan with the Humane Society of the United States, Aramark joined dozens of other food-service companies, restaurant chains, and supermarkets that have pledged to end their reliance on suppliers who house breeding pigs in confining crates their whole lives. "Aramark is proud to stand in partnership with other industry leaders and supply-chain partners to transition away from gestation crates in a timely fashion," said Kathy Cacciola, Aramark's senior director of environmental sustainability.
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SPORTS
June 16, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - Aaron Nola is one step away from joining the Phillies. The team's top pitching prospect was promoted to triple-A Lehigh Valley on Sunday afternoon. Nola made 12 starts this season at double-A Reading. He was 7-3 with a 1.88 ERA. The righthander struck out 59 batters in 762/3 innings. "We kind of had this date in our mind for a while," said Joe Jordan, the team's director of player development. "There's nothing magical about today versus five days ago. We thought it was important for him to spend the amount of time that he spent in double A. Obviously, he performed very well and it's time to go. "I feel very confident that Aaron is going to be himself and do what he does.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Here's what an extravaganza Pig Iron Theatre Company's new devised production, I Promised Myself to Live Faster , is: I had to check the program several times, because I couldn't believe it listed only five performers. As a tribute to Charles Ludlam and his Ridiculous Theatrical Company, this is right and good. Ludlam, who died in 1987 at 44, wrote, among other madcap works of camp and comedy, The Mystery of Irma Vep , in which two actors play approximately a zillion quick-change characters, all adapted from the overwrought gothic horror films and novels that no doubt influenced Ludlam's youth.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Friday at FringeArts, Pig Iron Theatre Company opens its Philadelphia premiere of I Promised Myself to Live Faster , hyped as "an intergalactic gay extravaganza featuring closeted extraterrestrials, high-stakes pursuits, and nuns from outer space. " That may sound like the quintessential wacky FringeArts promotional blurb. And it should, as Pig Iron was a pioneering participant in the Fringe two decades ago and has been a festival mainstay since. But the play - your typical quest for the Holy Gay Flame story - is also the work of a company that turns 20 this year, and is now a master's-of-fine arts-degree granting institution by way of a new partnership with the University of the Arts.
SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - Cody Asche waited two innings Tuesday night before seeing his first action in the field at triple-A Lehigh Valley. The third baseman turned leftfielder charged a shallow fly ball, called off the shortstop, and made the catch. Asche's outfield project was underway. Asche said the 6-5 win over Columbus was his first game in left field since a Florida Instructional League game in 2011. He was optioned to triple A on Monday after another Phillies loss. Asche had just three hits in his last 29 at-bats with the Phils.
SPORTS
April 30, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ST. LOUIS - Ryne Sandberg telegraphed the roster move before it happened, so it wasn't as shocking as it may have been otherwise when the Phillies announced yesterday afternoon that Domonic Brown had been reinstated from the disabled list and optioned to Triple A Lehigh Valley. Brown is less than two years removed from being a National League All-Star. He is making $2.5 million this season. But as Sandberg suggested on Monday, the Phillies would like to see Brown get his bat going in the minor leagues before deeming it ready for the team's major league lineup.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On Easter Sunday, after the sugar crash from too much candy, dinner traditionally revolves around a big, glossy ham. It may look picture-perfect as a holiday centerpiece, but if that ham came from the supermarket, its origin story is probably not so pretty. Luckily, there are options in locally produced hams with backstories you can feel good about. Ember Crivellaro, who runs Country Time Farm in Berks County with her husband, Paul, wants those who buy her hams to know what kind of life the pigs had. Because pictures speak louder than words, she carries a small collection of photographs in her wallet.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie vetoed a measure Friday to ban crates used to confine pregnant pigs, slamming it as a "solution in search of a problem" and a "political movement masquerading as substantive policy. " "We do not have an issue with gestation crates in New Jersey," Christie wrote in his veto message. He urged the Legislature to work on "significant issues" and "stop following misguided partisans and special interest groups who want to use the lawmaking process as a political cudgel on issues outside our borders.
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Few if any New Jersey pigs may be affected by Gov. Christie's decision, due Monday, on a bill to prohibit a farming practice of confining pregnant sows in cages so narrow they can't turn around. But the bill to ban gestation crates has drawn national attention - not just to the welfare of pigs, but to Christie's presidential prospects. "There is simply no reason for Gov. Christie not to sign it. The only reason is Iowa," said Matt Dominguez, public policy manager for farm animal protection at the Humane Society of the United States.
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