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Pilgrimage

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NEWS
April 15, 1986
Pope John Paul II's visit to the central synagogue in Rome Sunday - the first by any pope to any synagogue - was a symbolic act and a grand gesture, but it was far more than that. It was a landmark event that sent a powerful message to a world so frequently and so tragically torn by misunderstanding, bigotry and intolerance. The message from the Pontiff, conveyed by example as well as by words, was an eloquent evocation of the spirit of brotherhood and the practice of ecumenical good will.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On an April morning about 600 years ago, an imagined flock of pilgrims set out from Southwark, England, on foot and on horseback, for a pilgrimage to the cathedral city of Canterbury. The pilgrimage was described in a form of English that reads foreign to modern eyes but when translated still has a lyrical lilt: When April with its sweet showers The drought of March hath pierced to the root . . . Then folk long to go on pilgrimages . . . to Canterbury they wend . . . Geoffrey Chaucer was the writer and The Canterbury Tales was the bawdy, reverent, disrespectful and shrewd work that made his reputation before he died in the year 1400.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Riding along toward my destination, I turned over the numbers in my mind, as if repetition would make them more familiar: 3922 E. 147th Street, between Kinsman and Harvard. Our route through the Sunday morning quiet on the east side of Cleveland felt foreign, but we could have been traveling through Anytown, U.S.A. It had been 40 years since I called this community home, three decades since my last visit. Although I was born here, I have no roots in Cleveland's Mount Pleasant neighborhood.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was 12, Edwin Brizuela tried to cross the border from Mexico to Arizona five times, on one occasion spending the night in a detention facility. When he eventually made it that year, he joined his parents, who had immigrated previously, and thought his family's challenges were over. "For a lot of us, it's worse here than in our own country," said Brizuela, 21, who now lives in Pennsauken. "They keep us in the shadows. We're not criminals. We just want to work. " Brizuela joined about 50 people Monday in Camden to launch a 150-mile, nine-day Pilgrimage for Citizenship organized by PICO New Jersey, a faith-based nonprofit organization, and Camden Churches Organized for People.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
One part Buddhist ghost story, three parts Vertigo, Chang-Ho Lee's The Man with Three Coffins is a haunting film from South Korea about repetition compulsion. Based on the novel A Wanderer Never Sleeps Even on the Road, Lee's experimental film traces the pilgrimage of Yang (Myung-Kon Kim), a youthful widower who carries his wife's ashes back to her remote province. Like a sleepwalker, the mourner wafts through the landscape, uncertain whether his experiences are imagined or real.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If South Philadelphia - like Italy - were shaped like a boot, Medora's Mecca would be located somewhere near the heel. Which in this case is near the stadium complex, the Walt Whitman Bridge, the Philadelphia Food Distribution Center and the Schuylkill Expressway. This neat and cozy Italian restaurant is doing a good job living up to the Mecca in its name, serving as a place of pilgrimage for those who want the hungries satisfied with flavor at a reasonable price. The food here doesn't taste as if it has been simmering forever, waiting for you to stop in. A member of the Medora family is always around, whether it be in the attractive and nicely isolated bar area, the kitchen or the villalike dining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
EMILIO Estevez's oddball road movie, "The Way," does not have a moneymaking bone in its body, and I mean that in a good way. It's a true indie, financed outside the system, promoted via an old-fashioned barnstorming tour by Estevez and his dad, Martin Sheen, who are riding around the U.S. in a bus, hosting promotional screenings. The whole thing is a family affair - the idea came from one of Estevez's own sons who, while living in Spain, learned of the ritual of the Camino de Santiago - an 800-kilometer spiritual pilgrimage through the Pyrenees and Basque region of Spain.
SPORTS
December 4, 2005 | Inquirer photos and story by CHARLES FOX
Every few weeks I make a pilgrimage of sorts. It's a practice I have taken up while most of the traditional religious rituals have disappeared from my life. I drive north on 33d Street and go by the Palestra. I need to know it's still there. I know it's a practice that won't cure the world's ills, but seeing it always makes me feel better. It's not a ritual that makes me a better person or offers me salvation. But there have been times that the Palestra has made me feel close to something divinely magical.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | By Barbara Demick and Nadia Abou El Magd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II's gait was painfully slow, but his voice rang strong yesterday as he urged Christians, Jews and Muslims to honor God by trying to understand one another. It was a moment of personal triumph for the 79-year-old pontiff, who, despite Parkinson's disease, achieved a long-held desire for a pilgrimage to Mount Sinai, where Moses is believed to have received the Ten Commandments. "The wind which still today blows from Sinai reminds us that God wants to be honored in and through the growth of his creatures," the Pope said in English, at a ceremony outside a Greek Orthodox monastery at the foot of the mountain.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer This story contains information from the Associated Press
Before the announcement that Cardinal John O'Connor had died in New York last night, fellow Catholics, family and friends in his hometown were prepared to say their goodbyes to a giant of the church. "As a native son of Philadelphia, people are particularly attentive to the cardinal's situation," said the Rev. Michael F. DiGregorio, rector of the Shrine of St. Rita of Cascia, in South Philadelphia, where O'Connor led a 1998 pilgrimage. "He has certainly been a strong presence in the Catholic Church in the United States and beyond the church," DiGregorio said.
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TRAVEL
May 18, 2014 | By Raymond M. Lane, For The Inquirer
SLIGO, Ireland - "The landscape isn't, strictly speaking, necessary," said Helen Vendler of Harvard University. She has written about and teaches about Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet William Butler Yeats and other great writers and had some advice about the presumed pleasure of combining place with poetry - a lure to which all too many literary junkies fall prey. My librarian wife and I knew the wordy part about Ireland fairly well, and where to find some of its low-land temples.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was 12, Edwin Brizuela tried to cross the border from Mexico to Arizona five times, on one occasion spending the night in a detention facility. When he eventually made it that year, he joined his parents, who had immigrated previously, and thought his family's challenges were over. "For a lot of us, it's worse here than in our own country," said Brizuela, 21, who now lives in Pennsauken. "They keep us in the shadows. We're not criminals. We just want to work. " Brizuela joined about 50 people Monday in Camden to launch a 150-mile, nine-day Pilgrimage for Citizenship organized by PICO New Jersey, a faith-based nonprofit organization, and Camden Churches Organized for People.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - Across four decades, the renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz has trained her lens on people - rock stars, movie stars, and presidents. The world's headline-makers. In 2009, suddenly thrust into the headlines herself after filing for bankruptcy and still recovering from the loss several years earlier of her longtime companion Susan Sontag and her father, she shifted focus inward. Leibovitz, 63, jotted down a list of people who changed the world through their writings, their art, their discoveries, and their leadership, and ventured out to explore their private places.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
The Photo of the Week is a tie, both centering on America's sport. School's out, and "nothing says summer more than baseball, no matter what the age," wrote Kathy Clement of Havertown when she sent in this photo of her grandson Ryan, 8, warming up before pitching for his Little League team in Radnor. The Usher family of Audubon, Camden County, are the week's other winners. They are big fans of the game and made the pilgrimage to Cooperstown, N.Y. Bill Usher captured three of his children assuming the stance: Helene Frances, 7; Billy, 5; and Kieran, 3. Katharine, only 1, isn't quite up to batting yet, so she stayed with their mom, Helene.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Kay Johnson and Sinan Salaheddin, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Two car bombs in Iraq's capital killed at least 26 people Saturday on the last day of a Shiite pilgrimage already hit by bombings. The blasts, one in a heavily guarded area close to a revered shrine, raised the week's death toll to more than 100 and cast further doubt on the divided government's ability to secure the country after the American withdrawal. Black plumes of smoke filled the sky over Baghdad's northern Kazimiyah neighborhood, where the shrine to eighth-century saint Imam Moussa al-Kadhim draws hundreds of thousands of pilgrims each year.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012 | By Art Sands, For The Inquirer
We travel for many reasons, sometimes for a song. That's what took me in May to a hillside overlooking a country cottage near Armagh, Northern Ireland. Over hay wagon-wide farm roads, I tooled for hours in a little rental car on an improbable ride to the ancestral home of a musical hero, Tommy Makem. He died in 2007 and may not be Ireland's top dog in music anymore, or even remembered in America. But the Irish still call him "the godfather of Irish music. " And Makem was once so hot in America that at the 1961 Newport Folk Festival, they named him the most promising newcomer on the American folk scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
ASBURY PARK, N.J. - This week the National Constitution Center premieres its exhibit dedicated to the Boss, "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen," open through Sept. 3. But you can also take a weekend trip to see where it all began for Springsteen - in the actual Asbury Park, which is just a little over an hour's drive from Philadelphia. Springsteen's 1973 album Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. is a classic that not only told the world about the Jersey Shore but also gave the city a slogan it still uses today, even though the album showcased the tribulations of people living in a then-depressed town.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
EMILIO Estevez's oddball road movie, "The Way," does not have a moneymaking bone in its body, and I mean that in a good way. It's a true indie, financed outside the system, promoted via an old-fashioned barnstorming tour by Estevez and his dad, Martin Sheen, who are riding around the U.S. in a bus, hosting promotional screenings. The whole thing is a family affair - the idea came from one of Estevez's own sons who, while living in Spain, learned of the ritual of the Camino de Santiago - an 800-kilometer spiritual pilgrimage through the Pyrenees and Basque region of Spain.
NEWS
January 21, 2009 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All is dark outside as the chartered bus rolls out of the parking lot of the Acme Market in Mount Airy. It is just after 2 a.m. More than 50 people are on board, mostly African Americans, all intent on witnessing history. Organized by Northwest Philly for Change, a political group, they are campaign workers, community leaders, business owners, high schoolers, mothers and grandmothers, fathers and sons. Theirs is a pilgrimage to Washington. A prayer is offered by a leader of the team, followed by a greeting and free advice from their driver: "Patience, I think, is going to be the word of the day. " Amid light snoring and purposeful whispers, Vernon Price pulls a sepia photograph from the pocket of his dark suit.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By David O’Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia is honoring its 200th anniversary by offering its members a plenary indulgence, a practice begun in the Middle Ages that remains controversial and often confounding today. An indulgence, according to the church, allows Catholics who perform certain acts to shorten the time after death that their souls will have to spend in purgatory to atone for their sins. "It adds to the joy of the occasion, it allows each person a participation in the event, and it provides a lasting souvenir," Cardinal Justin Rigali told the archdiocese's 1.5 million members in a recent letter.
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