CollectionsPilgrims
IN THE NEWS

Pilgrims

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a coming-out of sorts for Archbishop Anthony Bevilacqua yesterday as he led an evening prayer service at the North American College for more than 500 pilgrims from the United States. Bevilacqua, resplendent in a green robe and white miter (a tall pointed hat used only during the most formal of ceremonies), walked into the beautiful chapel of the college in a procession led by three Philadelphia auxiliary bishops. Bevilacqua appeared genuinely warmed by the large turnout of family and friends, many of whom were seeing him for the first time since they had arrived in Rome yesterday morning.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
Under the brilliant midday sun yesterday, 41 South Jersey teenagers and young adults met in the parking lot of St. Peter's Church in Merchantville to embark on a time-honored journey of religion and faith - the pilgrimage. Transported by air-conditioned bus and jet plane, these modern-day pilgrims have advantages their ancient counterparts could only have dreamed of - but the purpose of their eight-day trip to Spain and Portugal is the same as that of pilgrims a thousand years ago. No ordinary student tour of Europe, this trip offers the youths, ages 15 to 21, a chance to affirm their ties with their religion and to view another culture firsthand.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jay Gorodetzer
As in schools throughout the land, young Pilgrims at Rose Tree Elementary School celebrated Thanksgiving this week. Paper hats, finger utensils, and honored guests for the feast made the occasion complete.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Adam Schreck and Nabil al-Jurani, Associated Press
ZUBAIR, Iraq - A bomb tore through a procession of Shiite pilgrims heading toward a largely Sunni town in southern Iraq on Saturday, killing at least 53 people in the latest sign of a power struggle between rival Muslim sects that has escalated since the American military withdrawal. Fears of more bloodshed have risen in recent weeks, with the United States no longer possessing the leverage it once had to encourage the two sides to work together to rein in extremists. Most of the latest attacks appeared to be aimed at Iraq's majority Shiites, suggesting Sunni insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-dominated government were to blame.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Christina Giberson, Special to The Inquirer
Grace Eleanor Maines Haupt of Woodbury, a retired schoolteacher and a direct descendant of the Pilgrims, died Wednesday in Cooper Hospital- University Medical Center in Camden. Mrs. Haupt was born in Watsontown, Pa., and graduated from Bucknell University in 1915. After graduation, she taught mathematics at Paulsboro High School and other secondary schools in Gloucester County. She lived in Woodbury for several decades. "My grandmother was an active person with an active mind up until the day she died," said her grandson, Bruce Hasbrook.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Iraq said yesterday that it decided to pull back thousands of Iraqi pilgrims from Saudi Arabia after the Saudis surrounded them with tanks and armored vehicles. Official Baghdad television quoted a senior Iraqi official who accompanied the pilgrims, who had been headed to Mecca as part of the annual hajj, as saying the Saudis also turned down an Iraqi demand that expenses of the pilgrims be withdrawn from Iraq's assets frozen in Arab and foreign banks. The charges followed recent tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iraq, which accuses the Saudis of allowing U.S. and British planes to use its bases to launch air strikes on Iraq.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Some pilgrims back from the Muslim holy city of Mecca have contradicted Saudi Arabia's assertion that 402 people died during a riotous demonstration by Iranians without a shot being fired by security forces. Accounts challenging parts of the Saudi version of the events of July 31 have come from residents of Israel and Malaysia, but those pilgrims also reported violence by demonstrators. "The truth is that we heard the shooting, and we saw them (Saudis) firing, but we did not know whether these were bullets or just the sound (of blanks)
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The rain brings togetherness, but enough already. Philadelphia's pilgrims were back in St. Peter's Square yesterday. So was Pope John Paul II. So was the rain. An audience with the pope - which sounds cozy but involves thousands of pilgrims on plastic chairs kept far from Il Papa by vigilant Vatican security - brought most of the Philadelphians back to the site of Sunday's canonization of Katharine Drexel. They joined a rainbow of Catholics at the Vatican to honor sainthood for a Spanish mother superior, an ex-Sudanese slave and 120 martyrs to the faith in China.
NEWS
April 8, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II often cautioned against the excesses of unbridled capitalism, so it's tempting to wonder what he would have made of the scene on the Borgo Santo Spirito near the Vatican this week, as customers swarmed a line of shops to snap up religious trinkets. "This exceeds all limits," said Maria Mocnik, 73, a dealer of religious items in the neighborhood for 47 years. She said she had never seen anything like the frenzy of buying and selling. "I haven't eaten since yesterday," said her sister, Giovanna, who came by to help behind the counter of the small store, as euros practically flew into the till.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
Once again it is almost Thanksgiving, the time of year when we go to the shopping mall of our choice in memory of the Pilgrims, a hardy band of men and women who set out from England in their frail ship, the Frail Ship III, in search of a place where they could exercise their constitutional right to set suspected witches on fire. It was a very difficult voyage - at times they thought they would never reach the New World - but finally, one morning, after 18 weeks at sea, the fog lifted and the lookout shouted the fateful words: "Hey!
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROME - About 10:15 Wednesday morning, 15 minutes ahead of schedule, a tall, white shimmer of glass motored into St. Peter's Square, where tens of thousands had gathered for the weekly papal audience. Heads turned, umbrellas swung, arms pointed, and the crowd murmur rose to a roar as Pope Francis, in the famous Popemobile, began a broad circle around the rain-swept square. "Viva il Papa!" shouted some. "Papa Francesco!" cried others. Grinning broadly, Francis waved, blessed them, and cupped his palms skyward, as though urging on their cries.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | BY LAWRENCE M. KRAUSS
"No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish. " - David Hume LAST WEEK the Vatican announced that a meeting of cardinals and bishops had ruled that the late Pope John Paul II was responsible for a second miracle, and thus the way was cleared for sainthood. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints decided that he had cured a woman from Costa Rica in 2011 after a panel of doctors apparently ruled that her recovery was otherwise inexplicable.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Beth Kephart
The day before there'd been a storm, and so the Wissahickon Creek ran freckled, like the back of a fawn. It was 51 degrees, the 13th of May, early, but not dawn. Fish jumped. Frogs demurred. A garden-variety Canada goose was jonesing for a show. If there were turtles on the backs of rocks, they achieved perfect incognito, and every bird that rustled was (it seemed) a chubby-bellied robin, until my eyes saw past the secrets of the trees. A chimney swift. A pair of fish crows. An operatic gray catbird wearing a very sweet toupee.
NEWS
June 8, 2013
Francis: Never wanted papacy VATICAN CITY - Pope Francis revealed Friday that he never wanted to be pope and joked that he's living in the Vatican hotel for his "psychiatric" health. Francis showed a personal and spontaneous side as he met with thousands of children from Jesuit schools across Italy and Albania. Tossing aside his prepared remarks, Francis surprised the children by asking them if they'd like to ask him some questions instead. Francis told them the decision to become a priest had been difficult and that he had suffered "moments of interior darkness" when "you feel dry, without interior joy. " But he said he went ahead because he loved Christ.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy - As bells tolled and the clock struck 8, the brass-studded wooden doors swung shut Thursday at this palace in the Italian hills, marking an end to Benedict XVI's papacy and the start of his final journey as a "simple pilgrim. " Capping a day of tearful farewells that included an extraordinary pledge of obedience to his successor, Benedict entered history as the first pope in 600 years to resign - leaving the Catholic Church in unprecedented limbo and ending a pontificate shaped by struggles to move beyond clerical sex-abuse scandals and reawaken Christianity in an indifferent world.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - His arms outstretched in a symbolic embrace, Pope Benedict XVI blessed tens of thousands of cheering people on Sunday in one of his last appearances as pontiff from his window overlooking St. Peter's Square. Last week, Benedict, 85, announced will step down on Feb. 28, planning to retreat to a life of prayer in a monastery behind the Vatican's ancient walls. The noontime appointment in the vast cobblestone square also served as a kind of trial run for how Rome will handle the logistics, including crowd security, as the city braces for the faithful to flock to Rome for the election and installation of the cardinal who will succeed Benedict as leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Adam Schreck and Nabil al-Jurani, Associated Press
ZUBAIR, Iraq - A bomb tore through a procession of Shiite pilgrims heading toward a largely Sunni town in southern Iraq on Saturday, killing at least 53 people in the latest sign of a power struggle between rival Muslim sects that has escalated since the American military withdrawal. Fears of more bloodshed have risen in recent weeks, with the United States no longer possessing the leverage it once had to encourage the two sides to work together to rein in extremists. Most of the latest attacks appeared to be aimed at Iraq's majority Shiites, suggesting Sunni insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-dominated government were to blame.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012 | By Russell Contreras, Associated Press
CHIMAYO, N.M. - They come in pain and in prayer, seeking cures and a cup of sand from a tiny adobe church called Chimayo. For two centuries, Hispanic and Native American pilgrims have sought help from El Santuario de Chimayo (pronounced CHEE-mah-YOH), located in a mountain hamlet in northern New Mexico. They clutch pictures of sick loved ones, hobble weakly on crutches, and bring stories of hopeless conditions. They leave small slips of paper asking for mercy and miracles, promise to give up drinking and show more compassion, and they light candles in front of images of saints and La Virgen de Guadalupe, patron of the Americas.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|