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Pilgrims

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NEWS
June 27, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a coming-out of sorts for Archbishop Anthony Bevilacqua yesterday as he led an evening prayer service at the North American College for more than 500 pilgrims from the United States. Bevilacqua, resplendent in a green robe and white miter (a tall pointed hat used only during the most formal of ceremonies), walked into the beautiful chapel of the college in a procession led by three Philadelphia auxiliary bishops. Bevilacqua appeared genuinely warmed by the large turnout of family and friends, many of whom were seeing him for the first time since they had arrived in Rome yesterday morning.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
Under the brilliant midday sun yesterday, 41 South Jersey teenagers and young adults met in the parking lot of St. Peter's Church in Merchantville to embark on a time-honored journey of religion and faith - the pilgrimage. Transported by air-conditioned bus and jet plane, these modern-day pilgrims have advantages their ancient counterparts could only have dreamed of - but the purpose of their eight-day trip to Spain and Portugal is the same as that of pilgrims a thousand years ago. No ordinary student tour of Europe, this trip offers the youths, ages 15 to 21, a chance to affirm their ties with their religion and to view another culture firsthand.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jay Gorodetzer
As in schools throughout the land, young Pilgrims at Rose Tree Elementary School celebrated Thanksgiving this week. Paper hats, finger utensils, and honored guests for the feast made the occasion complete.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Adam Schreck and Nabil al-Jurani, Associated Press
ZUBAIR, Iraq - A bomb tore through a procession of Shiite pilgrims heading toward a largely Sunni town in southern Iraq on Saturday, killing at least 53 people in the latest sign of a power struggle between rival Muslim sects that has escalated since the American military withdrawal. Fears of more bloodshed have risen in recent weeks, with the United States no longer possessing the leverage it once had to encourage the two sides to work together to rein in extremists. Most of the latest attacks appeared to be aimed at Iraq's majority Shiites, suggesting Sunni insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-dominated government were to blame.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Christina Giberson, Special to The Inquirer
Grace Eleanor Maines Haupt of Woodbury, a retired schoolteacher and a direct descendant of the Pilgrims, died Wednesday in Cooper Hospital- University Medical Center in Camden. Mrs. Haupt was born in Watsontown, Pa., and graduated from Bucknell University in 1915. After graduation, she taught mathematics at Paulsboro High School and other secondary schools in Gloucester County. She lived in Woodbury for several decades. "My grandmother was an active person with an active mind up until the day she died," said her grandson, Bruce Hasbrook.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Iraq said yesterday that it decided to pull back thousands of Iraqi pilgrims from Saudi Arabia after the Saudis surrounded them with tanks and armored vehicles. Official Baghdad television quoted a senior Iraqi official who accompanied the pilgrims, who had been headed to Mecca as part of the annual hajj, as saying the Saudis also turned down an Iraqi demand that expenses of the pilgrims be withdrawn from Iraq's assets frozen in Arab and foreign banks. The charges followed recent tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iraq, which accuses the Saudis of allowing U.S. and British planes to use its bases to launch air strikes on Iraq.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Some pilgrims back from the Muslim holy city of Mecca have contradicted Saudi Arabia's assertion that 402 people died during a riotous demonstration by Iranians without a shot being fired by security forces. Accounts challenging parts of the Saudi version of the events of July 31 have come from residents of Israel and Malaysia, but those pilgrims also reported violence by demonstrators. "The truth is that we heard the shooting, and we saw them (Saudis) firing, but we did not know whether these were bullets or just the sound (of blanks)
NEWS
November 20, 2015
DO YOU know the first words spoken by Native-Americans to the Pilgrims after they landed at Plymouth Rock? "Welcome Englishmen . . . I'll have a beer. " Or something to that effect, according to an account (see sidebar) of the first visit to the Pilgrims' village by an Algonquin named Samoset. The greeting comes to mind this season because it was those words that eventually led to the first Thanksgiving in America. That's right - though our nation's annual feast is traditionally washed down with wine, it actually began with beer.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The rain brings togetherness, but enough already. Philadelphia's pilgrims were back in St. Peter's Square yesterday. So was Pope John Paul II. So was the rain. An audience with the pope - which sounds cozy but involves thousands of pilgrims on plastic chairs kept far from Il Papa by vigilant Vatican security - brought most of the Philadelphians back to the site of Sunday's canonization of Katharine Drexel. They joined a rainbow of Catholics at the Vatican to honor sainthood for a Spanish mother superior, an ex-Sudanese slave and 120 martyrs to the faith in China.
NEWS
September 26, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three generation of Mortons, ranging in age from 4 to nearly 73, boarded a bus in Gary, Ind., about 7 a.m. Thursday and arrived in South Jersey in the wee hours Friday. The trip was close to 800 miles. They'd come to see Pope Francis. "Oooh, it was long," said Roxanne Morton, 45, a domestic violence shelter director, who had her little son, Royal, with her. But the Mortons weren't really complaining. "He's a holy man; he's so humble," she said. "His message is, we're here to take care of each other.
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NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Cynthia M. Allen The headlines the morning of July 26 were grim, as they are too often these days. The Rev. Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was murdered at the altar while saying Mass in a church in Rouen, France. His assailants, two teenage males armed with knives, reportedly declared their allegiance to the Islamic State before slaughtering him beneath the crucifix. As he lay dying, he is said to have whispered, "Go away, Satan," to the teens, whose actions were motivated by hatred.
TRAVEL
June 13, 2016 | By Rick Weiss, For The Inquirer
Why would anyone walk hundreds of miles across the north of Spain? Well, since the Middle Ages, millions of people have walked the Camino de Santiago de Compostela (The Way of St. James), a pilgrimage trail dedicated to the apostle. Pilgrims from all over Europe made the trek to pay homage at the tomb of St. James in the cathedral in Santiago. The traditional route (the French Way) starts in the Pyrenees Mountains and continues for about 500 miles. In modern times, about 200,000 people walk the camino every year, with many different motivations.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
THE DAUGHTER SAYS she wants to visit in July. "What can I get ready?" I ask. Bail money, she jokes. She's in Bernie's bag and is coming to visit her old Dad, but mainly to be outside the Wells Fargo Center to keep the Democratic National Convention fair, which is like keeping pro wrestling honest. Sanders has promised(?), suggested(?), threatened(?) that the convention will be "messy" if he's shut out. What does that mean? In the committees? On the convention floor? On Broad Street?
NEWS
November 20, 2015
DO YOU know the first words spoken by Native-Americans to the Pilgrims after they landed at Plymouth Rock? "Welcome Englishmen . . . I'll have a beer. " Or something to that effect, according to an account (see sidebar) of the first visit to the Pilgrims' village by an Algonquin named Samoset. The greeting comes to mind this season because it was those words that eventually led to the first Thanksgiving in America. That's right - though our nation's annual feast is traditionally washed down with wine, it actually began with beer.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
PAPAL PILGRIMS love Wawa sandwiches. About 1.1 million people went through security magnetometers during the two-day celebration. And, oh, by the way, Pope Francis thinks the women in Mayor Nutter's administration rock. These were just some of the takeaways from September's World Meeting of Families celebration, according to Deputy Mayor Everett Gillison and Samantha Phillips, the city's director of emergency management. Gillison and Phillips, in a sit-down with reporters yesterday, detailed what went well and not so well during the global event in Philly: * Unlike a prior July Fourth celebration in the city, cellphones actually worked.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
I WOULD LIKE to commend the Philadelphia police for their excellent service to all of us during the recent World Meeting of Families and papal-visit weekend. It was so inspiring to witness their goodness and assistance to all attendees (and to me, as a volunteer) during this unique event, and a pleasure to work alongside them. I would like to specifically mention the kind efforts of Officer Stephanie Velazquez during the Festival of Families before Pope Francis' arrival. There were several ticketed attendees, who, because of security restrictions and their later arrival, could not access their seats as the entrance to the seated area was then closed.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
Retired schoolteacher Matt Cinelli came to Philadelphia to experience the joy of the papal visit. He was met, he said, by "the confusion and terror of a police state," one in which edgy National Guard soldiers barked contradictory orders and seemed prepped for confrontation. "The security did not make me feel safe," said Cinelli, 56, who grew up Catholic and lives near Reading. "It made me feel like somebody was going to fight me, that there was a combativeness. " On Monday, hours after Pope Francis left Philadelphia for Rome, people who attended weekend events shared stories of disconcerting encounters with the massive security apparatus erected in advance of the visit.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A registrar records patients' vital statistics and issues each an ID bracelet with a unique bar code. Nearby, computers display readings from up to 48 heart monitors, alerting nurses if they need to rush to a patient's bedside. Defibrillators, ventilators, and intravenous pumps are on standby. And by Monday, it will all disappear. The $600,000 medical facility, housed in a suite of inflatable tents just off the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, south of Eakins Oval, is one of four high-tech stations that will serve the thousands flocking to see Pope Francis.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pilgrims from around the world snatched up souvenirs, embraced friends they first met only days ago, and chatted excitedly about the weekend to come as the international World Meeting of Families Congress ended Friday at the Convention Center. The imminent arrival of Pope Francis was the hot topic, prompting a giddy anticipation that buried any conference fatigue. "I'm looking forward to just being in his presence," said Maricela Artalejo, 49, a social worker from Boise, Idaho. "I see the face of Christ in him. " The pope's visit tops off the World Meeting of Families, an international gathering held every three years by the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three generation of Mortons, ranging in age from 4 to nearly 73, boarded a bus in Gary, Ind., about 7 a.m. Thursday and arrived in South Jersey in the wee hours Friday. The trip was close to 800 miles. They'd come to see Pope Francis. "Oooh, it was long," said Roxanne Morton, 45, a domestic violence shelter director, who had her little son, Royal, with her. But the Mortons weren't really complaining. "He's a holy man; he's so humble," she said. "His message is, we're here to take care of each other.
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