CollectionsPine Barrens
IN THE NEWS

Pine Barrens

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1987 | By Robert Gordon, Special to The Inquirer
You can swim in it, hike in it, canoe in it, sleep in it, eat in it. Its ruralness is often compared with Appalachia's. Its water is among the cleanest in the nation, though it looks a murky brown. And it is less than 50 miles from Philadelphia. What is it? It's the Pine Barrens, a tract of woodland and water encompassing more than a million mostly rustic acres of New Jersey - just about one-third of the state. It is known around the world for its botanical makeup and its wildlife.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Remember," warned Karl Anderson, who seemed wide awake and even good- natured despite the 6 a.m. hour, "all activities are rain or shine. You can stay back in your bunk and watch TV, or you can get wet. " And with that challenge issued under a heavy sky the color of gray cotton and a mist so fine it seemed like gossamer netting, Saturday morning of the New Jersey Audubon Society's Sixth Annual Pine Barrens Weekend began. Two groups of people, totaling about three dozen, proceeded from a main clearing near the borders of Pemberton and Woodland Townships, crossed a sandy expanse known as "Rattlers Row," and separated into the woods.
REAL_ESTATE
August 30, 1998 | By Lisa Suhay, FOR THE INQUIRER
One hundred square miles of majestic Pine Barrens, split by the Mullica River and enriched by pre-Revolutionary War history, give the area both charm and substance. And within, there are pockets of residences tucked away in the green cloak that covers this vast expanse of unspoiled wilderness known as Washington Township in Burlington County. About an hour from Philadelphia, the township is a prime day-trip destination for history buffs seeking Revolutionary War reenactments, hand-blown glass, and a breath of fresh piney air. A more serene spot would be hard to come by. While most are familiar with the region for Wharton State Forest and historic Batsto Village, site of a mid-18th-century ironworks, few may be aware of Green Bank and Lower Bank, the tiny communities that cling to the waterfront.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
"Do you smell that?" Dave Orleans asked 125 people Saturday night as they sat on logs around a bonfire in the Pine Barrens, home of the Jersey Devil. "It smells like rotting flesh. " As they sat wrapped in blankets to ward off the damp, swamp chill, storyteller Orleans was warming up his audience for four hours of terror. "This is the place where we can let all our fears run wild," he said. Audience members, some of whom came from as far away as Bergen County, paid $10 apiece to be scared by songs, stories and a haunted hayride through the cranberry bogs on the edge of the Lebanon State Forest.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a time when even the Chatsworth Post Office was in Buzby's General Store on the corner of First and Main Streets. Old Willis J. Buzby, who had been running the store since the late 1870s, was postmaster from 1917 to 1923. "Then my aunt across the street took it," said Willis Buzby's daughter- in-law, Kate Buzby. Her aunt ran the post office from her own store for 25 years. Well, things change even in Chatsworth, a small village of homes with manicured yards that lies in the middle of the Pine Barrens.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of people were evacuated from their homes yesterday afternoon when a fire raging in the Pine Barrens threatened to overrun a section of the Leisuretowne retirement village along Route 70 in Burlington County. Fanned by a stiff westerly wind, the blaze pushed to within a few yards of several houses on a paved street at the perimeter of the village in Southampton Township. It was stopped there, after burning about 30 acres, by firefighters using bulldozers, trucks and airplanes to isolate and attack the flames.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Acid rain has polluted almost all of the streams in the Pine Barrens, the forest that covers nearly a quarter of New Jersey, a federal study shows. "The (acid) levels in the Pine Barrens are pretty high, not the highest in the country, but close to it," said Mark Morgan, an associate professor of zoology at Rutgers University in Camden who has studied acid rain in the Pine Barrens for the last five years. Acid rain is formed when moisture in the air mixes with sulfur oxides released by burning oil, coal and gasoline.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
That New Jersey's Pine Barrens are such an ideal place for vegetation and wildlife to flourish is both a bane and a blessing for Whitesbog Preservation Trust volunteers such as John Joyce. It was at Whitesbog, once a self-contained, thriving village deep in the Pine Barrens in Pemberton Township, where Elizabeth White developed the first cultivated blueberry in 1916 and revolutionized New Jersey agriculture. Her three-story home, called Suningive, at the edge of the village, was the unofficial headquarters for the fledging commercial blueberry-growing industry, and it was there that White also directed her energies toward the establishment of a plant nursery and formal garden.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many Americans - maybe most - cranberry bogs are about as exotic and mysterious as rice paddies. So Joe Darlington and Brenda Conner, both fifth-generation cranberry growers, were happy to help the American Cranberry Growers Association organize Saturday's first-ever New Jersey Cranberry Harvest Kick-Off. The Garden State is the nation's third-largest cranberry producer. For the scores of people at the free event, it was sort of like Cranberries for Dummies. Under cloudless skies in historic Whitesbog Farm Village in Pemberton Township, the heart of the Pine Barrens, cranberry growers and researchers hung out at exhibit tables, explaining such things as the anatomy of a bog (kids could make a "bog in a cup")
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, STAFF WRITER
The seemingly endless woods flanking Route 72 might seem just "trees, trees, trees" to most motorists whizzing to and from the Jersey Shore. But to Russell Juelg, these were not mere "woods" he was visiting on this drizzly afternoon, but one of the newest additions to the vast and rustic Franklin Parker Preserve in the Pinelands of Burlington County. "I had to use four-wheel drive the last time I came through here," he said, inching his car along a narrow sand road. Then he paused alongside a broad patch of low, gauzy green and got out of the car. "Sand myrtle," he said, crouching down.
NEWS
August 12, 2015
SSUE | CLIMATE Northern Everglades It was a remarkable and rare occurrence that a manatee was found swimming in the Delaware River recently, but this was an alarm bell going off. With ocean and river temperatures hitting record highs, these events will happen more and more. New Jersey's weather trends are like those of Tidewater Virginia 30 years ago. And who knows whether 30 years from now, our weather will be more like northern Florida's? The way we're going, the Pine Barrens may end up being more like the Everglades unless something is done about climate change.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deep in the Pinelands, Albert Horner's SUV brushed against huckleberry bushes and low-hanging tree limbs while bumping along a narrow sandy road toward Jemima Mount - a once-picturesque hillside in Wharton State Forest. On the way, Horner navigated through scarred, battlefieldlike landscape, past massive ruts, water-filled holes, mud wallows, and felled trees. "You feel like it's the Wild West out here - just insanity," said Horner, 69, a longtime Medford Lakes resident and member of the board of trustees of the Pinelands Preservation Alliance (PPA)
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its winding sandy roads, pristine forests, and tea-color creeks, the land has an ethereal, fairy-tale quality. It is dominated by pitch pine uplands, and contains the headwaters of Biddle's Branch and Goodwater Run, both tributaries of the Wading River. And the inhabitants include endangered species such as bobcat and bald eagle, and threatened species such as the barred owl, northern pine snake, and Pine Barrens tree frog. This 473-acre tract has been added to the Franklin Parker Preserve, a vast Pinelands area surrounded by the Brendan T. Byrne, Bass River, Wharton, and Penn State Forests and the Greenwood Wildlife Management Area.
NEWS
March 11, 2015
ISSUE | GARDEN STATE Pollution legacy In the 1940s, my boyhood trips to my grandfather's farm in the Pine Barrens meant holding my breath from Newark to Bordentown because of the stench. North Jersey was a chemical cesspool and remains one to this day ("N.J. settles for millions, not billions," March 6). It will continue to be one unless irresponsible politicians do something about the problem. As President Obama said, each of us is part of the long story of human history, and we should try to get our paragraph right.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Kathy Anne English grew up inspired by the wildlife, landscapes, and people of the Pinelands. "I paint what I'm passionate about. I paint where I am," says the prolific watercolorist, who lives in a woodsy, light-filled home in Mullica Township, Atlantic County. For English, creating a 10th-anniversary poster for Lines on the Pines, a lively annual gathering of authors, artists, musicians, and craftspeople, was a natural. After all, they, too, are inspired by the 1.1 million-acre national reserve, a unique, fragile, and storied landscape that comprises nearly a quarter of the Garden State.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The changes in Woodland Township have been good or bad, depending on the point of view. Mayor Matthew Henrich says they've hurt the Burlington County township, stifling its sportsman culture and traditional outdoor activities that defined the community. Residents freely hunted on the 9,400 acres of the Pinelands before the land was bought in 2003 by the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a nonprofit that preserves land and natural resources. They fished and swam in reservoirs, and rode motorcycles and ATVs over the land, Henrich said.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Dave Levitan, For The Inquirer
Due to climate change, the iconic New Jersey forest known as the Pine Barrens may start to lose its namesake trees over the next century, a recent study concludes. As temperatures rise, the Pine Barrens may become the Oak Barrens. "The regeneration potential of pitch pine - the likelihood that they would be able to establish in a place - really plummets in the middle of the century, and that's purely a climate change signal," said Alec Kretchun, a forest ecology researcher at Portland (Ore.)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2014
ON A RECENT Saturday afternoon, I finally went hunting. I was outfitted to fight the elements and loaded for - not bear, but certainly hen of the woods and other kinds of wild-growing edible mushrooms. Armed with a knife and an old grocery bag, I set out with fungi enthusiast and local photographer Michele Frentrop and expert mushroom collector Felix Giordano to earn our food just like our ancestors did. Well, Felix's ancestors, anyway. I doubt mine ever had a plant-based meal that didn't originate in a freezer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|