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Pine Nuts

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FOOD
March 19, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
American Indians, Asians and Mediterranean peoples all have a tradition of gathering and eating pine nuts. Lately, pine nuts seem to be everywhere, especially in restaurants with Mediterranean cuisines. Not only are they delicious, but pine nuts also have a reputation as an aphrodisiac throughout the Mediterranean and in Asia. In Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love), the Roman poet Ovid recommends "the nuts that the sharp-leafed pine brings forth" as an aphrodisiac. Apicius, in his Roman cookbook De Re Coquinaria, suggests pine nuts with onions, white mustard and pepper to enhance physical love.
FOOD
September 18, 2003 | By Marlene Parrish FOR THE INQUIRER
Ask a die-hard martini drinker for his recipe, and I'll bet it will be made with gin, not vodka. The same goes for pesto. There is the traditional version vs. the newfangled. Pesto is a simple basil sauce from Italy's Ligurian region, the recipe so old that it is said to predate tomato sauce by 1,500 years. Today's pesto is a sauce of fresh basil leaves, fruity olive oil, sweet pine nuts, garlic and salt. Parmesan cheese is sometimes added. Pesto is always served fresh, never cooked.
FOOD
April 23, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
From the eastern shores of the Mediterranean as far as the Atlantic shores of Spain and Portugal, people savor simple uncooked, nut-thickened sauces. They range from tarator sauce in Lebanon and Turkey, to pesto and pistou along the Italian and French Rivieras, and picada and romesco in Spain. Every kind of tree nut - from walnuts to almonds, from hazelnuts to pine nuts - is used for these sauces, which also invariably contain garlic and olive oil. Rich, thick and fragrant with sharp, clean flavors, these simple sauces are served with grilled fish and other seafood, stirred into soups and slow-cooked for a final fragrant fillip, or spread onto bread.
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings Small bunch of the following herbs, leaves removed from stems and chopped, yielding about two teaspoons each: parsley, dill, celery leaves, mint, arugula, cilantro 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts 1/2 cup whole-milk ricotta Grilled rustic-style bread 1. Pick the leaves from the washed herbs and roughly chop them. 2. Begin crushing the herbs with a mortar and pestle. After 30 seconds to a minute, add the pine nuts and continue mashing until thoroughly mixed.
FOOD
October 22, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, collards and kale are excellent sources of carotenoids. These antioxidants are believed to have anti-cancer properties and to reduce the accumulation of arterial plaque. Kale contains an incredible amount of beta-carotene (the best known of the various carotenoids), with almost twice the daily recommended allowance. Cultivated for more than 2,000 years, kale is very low in calories, rich in Vitamins A and C, folic acid, calcium and iron.
FOOD
October 12, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If the fresh basil in your garden survived the weekend's frost, take nature's warning and bring it into the house, where you can prepare for a refreshing taste of summer throughout the winter. But do it quickly, for basil is a very delicate herb, and one of the first to fall victim to the cold weather. It is a member of the mint family and goes well with a wide range of foods such as pork, lamb, veal, fowl, seafood, soups, eggs and squash. One of its classic uses is pesto, the Genoan sauce creation made with pine nuts and olive oil. To keep basil without drying it - which will let it retain its fragrant essence and render it less pungent - chop the leaves finely, mix with a little water and freeze in ice-cube trays to use when needed.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1/2 pound farfalle or other bite-size pasta 1 teaspoon salt, divided 1/2 pound tomatoes, cored, halved, and seeded 1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup chopped red onion 1/4 pound sharp provolone, cut into ¼-inch cubes 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 ounces olive oil 1/2 cup basil leaves, loosely packed 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts (optional)...
FOOD
June 9, 2011 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
Beans and ham go together like country cousins - pork and beans, as in bacon-spiked baked beans; navy bean soup with nuggets of ham; and one of my favorites from my grandmother's kitchen: steamed green beans, fresh-picked from her farm's garden, studded with morsels of salty ham. This dish plays with that dynamic duo, substituting pieces of crackly prosciutto - made so by rendering in a skillet - to pair with the plump green beans. Toasted pine nuts play their flavor off both green beans and the cured ham. Parmesan and a drizzle of olive oil bring it all together.
FOOD
September 25, 2008
Chef Peter Woolsey (Paris' Lucas Carton, Philly's Striped Bass) has been winning raves at his new Bistrot La Minette in Queen Village. While early goers praise the flammekueche (Alsatian "pizza") and the lamb shank, don't overlook the red-mullet appetizer known as rouget à la Niçoise. The fish sits atop an earthy salad of oven-roasted tomatoes, black olives, parsley, basil, capers, and toasted pine nuts, ringed by a vinaigrette of lemon, olive oil and reduced fish stock.
FOOD
September 20, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
With cans of specialty imported sardines in hand, I thought to make something a little different, instead of just eating them my usual way, plain. Pasta came to mind, as it often does. The Sicilians have a classic dish pairing sardines with golden raisins and wild fennel, for a sweet and sour combination that plays beautifully against the rich fish. But the traditional dish calls for fresh sardines. And wild fennel, while apparently abundant on the Italian island, is nearly impossible to find here.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings Small bunch of the following herbs, leaves removed from stems and chopped, yielding about two teaspoons each: parsley, dill, celery leaves, mint, arugula, cilantro 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts 1/2 cup whole-milk ricotta Grilled rustic-style bread 1. Pick the leaves from the washed herbs and roughly chop them. 2. Begin crushing the herbs with a mortar and pestle. After 30 seconds to a minute, add the pine nuts and continue mashing until thoroughly mixed.
FOOD
February 12, 2016
Makes 6 servings 6 halibut fillets, skinless and boneless (1 pound, 14 ounces) 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 12 breakfast radishes, green leaves and roots left on and sliced in half lengthwise (or 8 round red radishes) Coarse sea salt and black pepper Wild arugula and parsley vichyssoise: 31/2 ounces parsley stems and leaves 51/4 ounces wild arugula 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 medium shallots, coarsely chopped (31/2 ounces)
NEWS
March 22, 2013
TROY What to eat: Mediterranean meat? Yes, please. Beef, chicken, kofte (ground meat) and gyro. Over rice with a mini-salad on the side, or in a wrap. Topping options include white tzatziki, barbecue and hot sauces - and there's nothing wrong with asking for all three. Or try grape leaves stuffed with rice, onions, pine nuts, currants, fresh dill and mint. It's vegetarian. (Warning: This may be an acquired taste for some). Cost: Main items priced from $4.50 to $5.50. Portions are large.
FOOD
October 11, 2012 | By Elaine Gordon, Washington Post
With their vibrant color, stuffed peppers provide a stunning presentation as a main course. This version is gluten-free and vegan, with protein-rich quinoa. Quinoa-Stuffed Peppers Serves 4 For the stuffed peppers 4 bell peppers, any color 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup diced shallot (2 or 3) 1/2 cup diced zucchini 1 cup quinoa, rinsed 2 cups vegetable broth,    plus more for the baking dish 1/2 teaspoon fresh black pepper For the pesto 2 cups basil leaves 2 tablespoons pine nuts 2 to 4 medium cloves garlic 2 tablespoons walnuts 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
FOOD
September 20, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
With cans of specialty imported sardines in hand, I thought to make something a little different, instead of just eating them my usual way, plain. Pasta came to mind, as it often does. The Sicilians have a classic dish pairing sardines with golden raisins and wild fennel, for a sweet and sour combination that plays beautifully against the rich fish. But the traditional dish calls for fresh sardines. And wild fennel, while apparently abundant on the Italian island, is nearly impossible to find here.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1/2 pound farfalle or other bite-size pasta 1 teaspoon salt, divided 1/2 pound tomatoes, cored, halved, and seeded 1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup chopped red onion 1/4 pound sharp provolone, cut into ¼-inch cubes 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 ounces olive oil 1/2 cup basil leaves, loosely packed 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts (optional)...
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wishful thinking is a gluttonous beast, just like many Americans. Perhaps that's why it's tough to tour the Internet in the month of New Year's resolutions without tripping over all sorts of pain-free diet tips. Search a bit, and it's easy to whip up a list of 10 ways to shed some pounds without strenuous diet or exercise. This does not constitute endorsement. Remember, experts generally say, if you really want to lose weight and keep it off, do so gradually by exercising more, switching to more nutritious foods, and consuming fewer calories.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011
In the Region Profit posted by Beneficial Bank Beneficial Bank , the biggest bank headquartered in Philadelphia, reported its biggest quarterly profits in more than a year. CEO Gerry Cuddy said he still had a subdued outlook on the economy. Profit was $4 million, or 5 cents per share, in the quarter ended Sept. 30. The bank's loss in the same period a year ago was $21.7 million, or 28 cents per share. - Harold Brubaker Earnings, revenue up at Hershey The Hershey Co. reported a 9 percent increase in its third-quarter profit, citing higher prices and stronger-than-expected Halloween sales.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | Staff Report
Wegmans is recalling all of the Turkish pine nuts it sold from its bulk food department from July 1 through October 18. The store says the nuts may be contaminated with Salmonella, a bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness. Store officials say the recall amounts to about 5,000 pounds of the nuts sold in the bulk food departments of of most Wegmans stores in New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Virginia, and Maryland between July 1 and October 18, 2011. The bottled pine nuts Wegmans sells in its grocery department are not part of the recall.
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Today Shop, cook and eat with chef Chris Allen of Lotus Farm to Table, who will lead participants through the Media Farmer's Market to pick out fresh items that he will prepare in front of you for the evening's dinner. $55. Meet at 3 p.m. at Lotus Farm to Table, which is a BYOB, 112 W. State St., Media, 610-565-5554, www.lotusfarmtotable.com . Saturday, Sept. 24 Cast Iron Chef , a demonstration featuring experienced hearth cooks who will prepare period-appropriate meals over an open fire or on a hearth with items from a basket of surprise seasonal ingredients.
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