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Pippin

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The folks who brought magic to the new Pippin in Massachusetts are coming south to Broadway. Producers on Monday said Matthew James Thomas would star this spring as Pippin; Patina Miller would be the Leading Player; Terrence Mann would be Charles; Charlotte d'Amboise would play Fastrada; Rachel Bay Jones would be Catherine, and Andrea Martin would play Berthe. All starred in the show that ended its run last month at the American Repertory Theater outside Boston.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Long after her last class of the day, a virtual sea of teenage faces surrounds Ali LaVecchia. A girl has to show the Haddonfield Memorial High School teacher and director her costume. Someone else needs LaVecchia's keys. Another actor needs to know how long practice will last, and the person at the back of the line wants to find out if her aunt can attend a special matinee showing of Pippin, the musical that will open this week. Unfazed by the commotion, LaVecchia inspects fabric, dispenses keys and answers questions with the poise of a pro. After all, she is one: LaVecchia, 49, is the veteran of 52 dramas, comedies, musicals and sundry theater ventures, many of which have taken place during her years at Haddonfield Memorial.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | SCOTT S. HAMRICK / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Young stars were putting up stars at Bala Cynwyd Middle School as part of a fund-raising effort that includes a school musical. This weekend's "Pippin" will raise money for the Cyctic Fibrosis Foundation. Leila Orchin, 14, hangs stars that were sold for a dollar donation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's no surprise that there's a smart-alecky, jaunty, sometimes too-clever- for-its-own-good feel to the American Experiment Theater's inaugural production. The show, running through Sunday at Haverford School's Centennial Hall, is Stephen Schwartz's musical revue Magic to Do, and its director is his son, Scott, who comes to us straight from Harvard. Schwartz isn't even a Harvard graduate - he's a senior, presumably headed back to school in the fall. So, consider his founding of a professional theater company (along with recent Harvard alum Jon Dorf)
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cardinal O'Hara High School, an Archdiocese of Philadelphia school at 1701 S. Sproul Rd., Springfield, is hosting a series of public events for the school's annual Fine Arts Week. Tonight and tomorrow at 7 student art will be on display and O'Hara band members will play chamber music. These events will be followed at 8 both nights by the musical Pippin. Admission to Pippin is $6 and $8; all other events are free. FUN FAIR Park Lane Elementary School, part of the William Penn School District, will host a Fun Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the time he was little, Clayton Strange wanted to dance. He would cut the rug for family and friends almost from the time he could walk, said his mother, Lillian. He was only 4 when he turned to her and made it official. "He said he wanted to be a dancer and an entertainer," Lillian Strange said. "He was bitten by show biz. " Clayton Strange, who went on to fulfill his childhood dream by dancing professionally in shows such as Pippin and Ain't Misbehavin', died Feb. 1 at age 34 of a collapsed lung at Graduate Hospital.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bala Cynwyd Middle School students have combined a forthcoming production of Pippin with a fund-raising event for the National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Upon learning that one of the cast members has cystic fibrosis, theater teacher Bobbi Wolf and the cast of 150 designed the event. They have raised $1,800 for the foundation by selling paper stars and donated items: bottled water, snacks and Pippin T-shirts. The school is part of the Lower Merion School District. MODEL UN The Baldwin School, a private girls' school in Bryn Mawr, recently sent 21 students to the Invitational Model United Nations Simulation at Georgetown University.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International, USA Today and the Los Angeles Times.)
It seemed more like Hellzapoppin than Pippin at yesterday's matinee in Wilmington's Playhouse Theater. Yesterday morning, the show's star, Ben Vereen, flew by helicopter to Browns Mills, N.J., where he did a charity appearance at Deborah Heart and Lung Center. But his whirlybird broke down when it was time to go and Vereen missed Pippin's 2 p.m. curtain. The show was delayed 30 minutes before going on with understudy Jeffery C. Ferguson playing the Vereen part, as master of ceremonies.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inside Cheltenham High School's Stretton Hall auditorium, a black Cain and a white Abel can be brothers; an East Indian Noah can spawn four white children; and the Bible's first couple can begin an interracial romance without question. As in years past, last year's spring musical, Children of Eden, showcased a diverse district's commitment to color-blind casting. Of the district's 5,100 students, 35 percent are black, 10 percent are Asian, and 1 percent are Latino. Despite a district-wide push to promote greater cross-cultural understanding across all areas, students at the high school admit that they continue to cluster by race in the hallways and the lunchroom.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Giving up free time to be at school instead of spending it with friends or watching television might seem unusual for most teenagers, but for area high school students involved in theater, there's no other place to be. "It's the best feeling in the world when the curtain opens and closes," said Rachel Wolfson, a Marple Newtown High School senior, while waiting backstage for the curtain to rise on the musical Grease. Wolfson is one of more than 100 students who worked onstage, backstage and offstage to make a success of the 1950s-based musical, the school's first large-scale musical in nearly a decade.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Horace Pippin died in West Chester in July 1946 at age 58, the New York Times obituary praised the painter as a "noted Negro artist, who taught himself to paint. " The Times then reported that "the simplicity of the primitives he produced" had led Chester County critic Christian Brinton to compare Pippin to "Pittsburgh road digger John Kane, famed housepainter artist. " Even in death, Pippin was presented not on his own terms, but in relation to a white artist in a comparison made by a white critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The African American Museum in Philadelphia and the Brandywine River Museum combine forces on Saturday to celebrate the 127th anniversary of West Chester artist Horace Pippin with a "crafternoon" at the African American Museum. Festivities begin with a reading aloud of A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin by Jen Bryant. Pippin often included a red highlight in his landscapes, domestic interiors, and historic scenes. Afterward, guests can make their own art inspired by the artist.
NEWS
September 7, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horace Pippin deserved better. That's all librarian Christina McCawley and her husband, Dwight, could think of as they pushed away the branches. The West Chester couple had gone in search of the grave site of the self-taught artist whose work hangs on the walls of major museums. On their second visit to Chestnut Grove Annex Cemetery in West Goshen Township, they found Pippin's resting place. It was buried, the couple said, beneath the branches of a tree-size bush that dwarfed McCawley and her husband.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was 8 or 9, in the 1960s, Jen Bryant learned to type by copying obituary material on the desk of her father, a Flemington, N.J., undertaker. In 2004, having already published more than a dozen books, she happened on a painting at the Brandywine River Museum by Horace Pippin, the late African American artist from West Chester. Bookend events. From her first childhood taste of writing to her latest children's book, A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin, published by Alfred A. Knopf in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The folks who brought magic to the new Pippin in Massachusetts are coming south to Broadway. Producers on Monday said Matthew James Thomas would star this spring as Pippin; Patina Miller would be the Leading Player; Terrence Mann would be Charles; Charlotte d'Amboise would play Fastrada; Rachel Bay Jones would be Catherine, and Andrea Martin would play Berthe. All starred in the show that ended its run last month at the American Repertory Theater outside Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's difficult to know whether my fondness for Pippin endures because it's such an infatuating musical or because I was able to lure my infatuating new girlfriend to come see it on Broadway in the '70s. Something about that date involves staying power, for me and for Pippin. All these years later I'm still her husband and Pippin's still around, now on a national tour. Bits of the original (the original Pippin, not the original me) shine at the Forrest, where the story of Charlemagne's restless, frustrated eldest son opened Thursday night.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | By Sharon Hernes Silverman FOR THE INQUIRER
An art critic might call a painting "vibrant" or "energetic" - words that also apply to the flourishing art scene in West Chester. Thanks to a cluster of galleries - along with civic improvements, plenty of restaurants, and the borough's inherent charm - West Chester has become a destination for the region's art lovers. West Chester's gallery boom is the continuation of a long-standing artistic tradition that goes back to Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth and Horace Pippin. The area has inspired generations of artists.
SPORTS
September 13, 2003 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't easy being a Nebraska Cornhusker from Philly during the off-season. Just ask Jerrell Pippins, a football and track star at West Catholic High in the late 1990s and now a senior free safety at Nebraska. The last time Pippins came home to visit family and friends, he encountered plenty of razzing about the way Penn State manhandled the Cornhuskers, 40-7, at Beaver Stadium last September. "Yeah, it was rough going home," the 6-foot-2, 195-pound Pippins said early this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
To mark Black History Month, the Reading Public Museum is introducing its audience to legendary folk painter Horace Pippin through a small survey show that illustrates the artist's principal themes - war images, portraiture, still lifes and especially scenes of black life. "In Search of Horace Pippin: Three Views" turns out to be a surprisingly strong presentation. It contains only 18 works, including three of the burnt-wood panels that got him started as an artist. However, the loans, from museums such as the National Gallery of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, are strong.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inside Cheltenham High School's Stretton Hall auditorium, a black Cain and a white Abel can be brothers; an East Indian Noah can spawn four white children; and the Bible's first couple can begin an interracial romance without question. As in years past, last year's spring musical, Children of Eden, showcased a diverse district's commitment to color-blind casting. Of the district's 5,100 students, 35 percent are black, 10 percent are Asian, and 1 percent are Latino. Despite a district-wide push to promote greater cross-cultural understanding across all areas, students at the high school admit that they continue to cluster by race in the hallways and the lunchroom.
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