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Pistachios

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SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Human-interest writer
Nobody else could sell pistachios. Others tried. Just Pistachio Girl. She parted the seas, the standing-room-only crowds at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday night, and bounced down the aisles, a cult figure. Art Ehlo, 58, a season-ticket holder down the third-base line, gave her a fist bump. "I've got pictures of her in my phone with me," he said. Debbie Brown, an usher in Section 136, took a photo. "She's fascinating," Brown said. "She's part of this ballpark. There's a whole page for her on Facebook, 'Fans of The CBP Pistachio Girl.' " More than 500 people "like" it. Pistachio Girl has no idea who started it. In Section 116, a desperate voice rang out, "I love you, Pistachio Girl!"
FOOD
November 11, 1992 | By Leslie Land, FOR THE INQUIRER
Most nutmeats are not what you'd call seasonal items. With the exception of chestnuts, they're available all year round, and a handful of salted almonds is as welcome in April as in October. But there's something about the shortening days of late autumn, the falling of the last leaves, that stimulates in many of us an increased appetite for every kind of the high-calorie little dears we can get our hands on. Perhaps it's because they are once again aggressively on display.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 2 cups, or about 10 servings 1 5-ounce box of  baby   arugula 3 tablespoons  pistachios 2 tablespoons Dijon  mustard 2 tablespoons black pepper 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar Salt (to taste) With mixer or blender, puree arugula and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add pistachios and puree. Add remaining ingredients - oil last - and puree again.   - Courtesy of McCaffrey's   Per serving: 121 calories, 2 grams protein, 2 grams carbohydrates, trace sugar, 12 grams fat, 2 milligrams cholesterol, 78 milligrams sodium, trace dietary fiber.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
Company description: Grilled chicken, hearth-roasted apples, candied pistachios, dried cranberries, feta, mixed greens and caramel vinaigrette. Chain: Cosi. Calories: 515, with 26 grams of fat, 27 grams of protein and 597 mgs of salt. Location: 833 Chestnut St. Order time: A few minutes. Price: $7.99. Review: It takes a lot to get the Chain Gang to not order a Cosi thin crust flatbread pizza. But we always like to try their specials, too, and the Autumn Apple Chicken Salad is a winner.
FOOD
July 26, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Several days ago an assistant at my cooking school came to work excited about a forthcoming party. Some friends had moved into a new house and had asked a group over for dinner, and the guests had decided to bring the appetizers and desserts as housewarming gifts. My assistant asked if I would help her create a special appetizer. She had only one requirement, which was that the dish be made with Brie, a favorite cheese of the hosts. Immediately I thought of Baked Brie Stuffed With Asparagus and Pistachios.
FOOD
September 23, 2010
Nestled beside the Wissahickon along the pedestrian paradise of Forbidden Drive, historic Valley Green Inn has long conjured an image of a fusty park amenity for the wedding crowd and the ladies-luncheon crab cake set. But there's been a surprising push to update the menu over the last couple years that paid tasty dividends at a recent lunch, with deft nods to lighter dishes that focus on good seasonal ingredients. Alongside well-wrought classics (such as rich French onion soup and a tender sirloin sandwich)
FOOD
March 19, 2009
This dish is packed with flavor and texture. Chinese mustard greens and Chinese mustard (another use for those little takeout packets!) each lend a peppery zing. - Bonnie S. Benwick / Washington Post Chicken and Pistachio Fried Rice 4 to 6 servings 1. Mince the ginger and the garlic. Trim the roots of the scallions and coarsely chop (both white and green). Wash, dry and cut the mustard greens to yield 2 packed cups. 2. Heat 2 tablespoons of the peanut oil in a wok or large nonstick skillet over high heat until it begins to smoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
At first glance, Afghan cuisine, much like the Afghan language, seems bundled in Arabic garb. But it's simply the packaging that's familiar. Both the language and food are unique to the people of that landlocked country. For proof, one need not go any farther than Kabul, the interesting Afghan restaurant on Chestnut Street in Old City. "We're not like Indian food, and we're not like the Arabic food," said Wali Saai, who operates the restaurant with his brother-in-law, Mohamad Kadir.
FOOD
March 8, 1992 | By Ethel G. Hofman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A new addition to the Edwardian Food Halls at Harrods, that amazing emporium of international fame, features a mouthwatering display of some most un-British sweetmeats - Middle Eastern pastries. The selection includes more than 50 varieties, including a half-dozen oversize cookie sheets of plump, green pistachios, creamy almonds and crinkly walnuts all together, lightly bound together with toffee. All are enticing treats that can start the salivary glands working overtime before you even taste them.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 11, 2016
I went for the crab cake, but left with pavlova in my heart. Our appetites had been primed for classic French cuisine by King Georges , Erika Frankel's engaging documentary about Georges Perrier, in which Le Bec-Fin's chef feverishly whipped up a batch of his signature "galette" crab cakes when the kitchen was at risk of running out ("You will never '86' the galette!") But now that Le Bec is long gone, Le Chéri, owned by Pierre Calmels, one of Perrier's last chefs, is among the last places (and at lunch only)
FOOD
February 12, 2016
Makes 6 servings 6 halibut fillets, skinless and boneless (1 pound, 14 ounces) 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 12 breakfast radishes, green leaves and roots left on and sliced in half lengthwise (or 8 round red radishes) Coarse sea salt and black pepper Wild arugula and parsley vichyssoise: 31/2 ounces parsley stems and leaves 51/4 ounces wild arugula 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 medium shallots, coarsely chopped (31/2 ounces)
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 2 cups, or about 10 servings 1 5-ounce box of  baby   arugula 3 tablespoons  pistachios 2 tablespoons Dijon  mustard 2 tablespoons black pepper 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar Salt (to taste) With mixer or blender, puree arugula and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add pistachios and puree. Add remaining ingredients - oil last - and puree again.   - Courtesy of McCaffrey's   Per serving: 121 calories, 2 grams protein, 2 grams carbohydrates, trace sugar, 12 grams fat, 2 milligrams cholesterol, 78 milligrams sodium, trace dietary fiber.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
Company description: Grilled chicken, hearth-roasted apples, candied pistachios, dried cranberries, feta, mixed greens and caramel vinaigrette. Chain: Cosi. Calories: 515, with 26 grams of fat, 27 grams of protein and 597 mgs of salt. Location: 833 Chestnut St. Order time: A few minutes. Price: $7.99. Review: It takes a lot to get the Chain Gang to not order a Cosi thin crust flatbread pizza. But we always like to try their specials, too, and the Autumn Apple Chicken Salad is a winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2012 | Dan Gross
GOOD NEWS for fans of Citizens Bank Park food vendor Pistachio Girl. The fan favorite, whose real name is Emily Youcis, is back at the ballpark selling Wonderful brand pistachios this season, the Phillies and Aramark confirm. Some fans were concerned Monday when they did not see the Tyler School of Art senior during the Phillies' home-opener. A Phillies spokeswoman said not to worry, Youcis merely had taken a day off on Monday. Youcis could not be reached to discuss what could have been more pressing than hawking "Pistaaaachios" at the home-opener.
SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Human-interest writer
Nobody else could sell pistachios. Others tried. Just Pistachio Girl. She parted the seas, the standing-room-only crowds at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday night, and bounced down the aisles, a cult figure. Art Ehlo, 58, a season-ticket holder down the third-base line, gave her a fist bump. "I've got pictures of her in my phone with me," he said. Debbie Brown, an usher in Section 136, took a photo. "She's fascinating," Brown said. "She's part of this ballpark. There's a whole page for her on Facebook, 'Fans of The CBP Pistachio Girl.' " More than 500 people "like" it. Pistachio Girl has no idea who started it. In Section 116, a desperate voice rang out, "I love you, Pistachio Girl!"
FOOD
September 23, 2010
Nestled beside the Wissahickon along the pedestrian paradise of Forbidden Drive, historic Valley Green Inn has long conjured an image of a fusty park amenity for the wedding crowd and the ladies-luncheon crab cake set. But there's been a surprising push to update the menu over the last couple years that paid tasty dividends at a recent lunch, with deft nods to lighter dishes that focus on good seasonal ingredients. Alongside well-wrought classics (such as rich French onion soup and a tender sirloin sandwich)
FOOD
March 19, 2009
This dish is packed with flavor and texture. Chinese mustard greens and Chinese mustard (another use for those little takeout packets!) each lend a peppery zing. - Bonnie S. Benwick / Washington Post Chicken and Pistachio Fried Rice 4 to 6 servings 1. Mince the ginger and the garlic. Trim the roots of the scallions and coarsely chop (both white and green). Wash, dry and cut the mustard greens to yield 2 packed cups. 2. Heat 2 tablespoons of the peanut oil in a wok or large nonstick skillet over high heat until it begins to smoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
At first glance, Afghan cuisine, much like the Afghan language, seems bundled in Arabic garb. But it's simply the packaging that's familiar. Both the language and food are unique to the people of that landlocked country. For proof, one need not go any farther than Kabul, the interesting Afghan restaurant on Chestnut Street in Old City. "We're not like Indian food, and we're not like the Arabic food," said Wali Saai, who operates the restaurant with his brother-in-law, Mohamad Kadir.
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