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Pitch Count

SPORTS
April 4, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTA - Charlie Manuel raised his left arm at 8:38 p.m. Wednesday and looked to the bullpen. The steady rain that dampened Turner Field persisted. The gloom extended north to Philadelphia. With one out in the fourth inning of a 9-2 Phillies loss to Atlanta, Roy Halladay capitulated. He ditched the weapons that, for a decade, armed a dominant pitcher. When Halladay threw his fastball, Braves hitters mashed it. The constant diet of off-speed pitches elicited strikeouts, but at the cost of a rising pitch count.
NEWS
May 29, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - It was the perfect time for a breakout, a team dealing with more injury issues and a player mired in one of the mini slumps that mark the long 162-game season. Ty Wigginton brought back memories of yesteryear, or at least April, and his career day couldn't have occurred at a more opportune time. Wigginton went 3 for 3 with a double, home run and a career-high six RBIs as the Phillies beat the New York Mets, 8-4, in a Memorial Day afternoon matchup at Citi Field.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a #badloss, and the line of questioning afterward appealed to Charlie Manuel about as much as his late-inning bullpen bridge to closer Jonathan Papelbon. Already grumpy after watching Antonio Bastardo turn seven shutout innings from Cole Hamels into a 3-1 deficit in the top of the eighth inning, Manuel also had to answer for his own handling of the bench Sunday as the Phillies tried to rally in the bottom of the eighth in the first game of a doubleheader. "You guys ought to sit in the dugout with me and give me all the scenarios if you don't think I know them," the manager told reporters, mixing his Southern drawl with biting sarcasm.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
PITTSBURGH - Closers are different. That is a fact acknowledged by everyone who has ever set foot in a baseball clubhouse. What's amazing is that they can be different in so many different ways. "He's typical, I guess," Roy Halladay said Thursday after he combined with new closer Jonathan Papelbon to blank the Pittsburgh Pirates in the Phillies' 1-0 opening-day victory at PNC Park. Halladay meant that Papelbon was typical because he has proven to be every bit as different as every closer he has met during his well-decorated career.
SPORTS
August 27, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
A LITTLE BIT of run support was all the Doc had ordered. Roy Halladay returned to a big-league mound a bit earlier than expected as he joined the Phillies following a historic 18-inning loss Saturday night in which yesterday's scheduled starter was used in relief. Halladay had been scheduled to make a rehab start yesterday at Double A Reading. The two-time Cy Young Award winner outpitched Arizona ace lefthander Patrick Corbin in the Phillies' 9-5 victory yesterday afternoon. Halladay walked off the field after a scoreless sixth inning to his second standing ovation of the afternoon, his pitch count at 94. The 36-year-old's day was done after holding the Diamondbacks to two runs on four hits and two walks, with two strikeouts.
SPORTS
April 5, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
ATLANTA - It is an obituary nobody wants to write, and only Roy Halladay can prevent it from being written. He forced us all to sharpen our pencils Wednesday night. If the question before this start was whether Halladay would be closer to his vintage self now that the games count, it is now this: If he isn't going to be that pitcher again, can he learn how to be effective in a different way? The guess here is that the answer will turn out to be yes. Halladay is just too competitive, too dedicated to his craft to be daunted by this challenge.
SPORTS
June 9, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILWAUKEE — Cliff Lee's left arm had thrown 101 high-stress pitches when he assumed his spot in the on-deck circle Friday. He flicked his bat through the crisp Midwestern air when a fan's voice caught his attention. A boy wearing a blue Brewers jersey offered red licorice in the seventh inning. Lee grabbed a piece, ate it, and nodded his head as the small swath of fans applauded. This is when a 5-4 Phillies loss started to sour. Three of the Phillies' best relievers were unavailable.
NEWS
April 1, 2011
By Jim Kaplan Will we ever see another pitching duel? I don't mean what passes for one these days - with starters lasting six, seven, or eight innings before invariably giving way to the bullpen. I'm referring to the days when two grizzled pitchers strapped on their gloves expecting to work into extra innings if that's what it took to finish the game. Ever since I began researching the mother of all pitching duels - the 1963 16-inning classic waged by Hall of Famers Juan Marichal of the Giants (227 pitches)
SPORTS
April 8, 2013 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
TAKE AWAY a gem of a performance by Cliff Lee and a bases-clearing, pinch-hit double by Kevin Frandsen and the Phillies would be 0-6 heading into Roy Halladay's scheduled start against the Mets on Monday night. So things could be worse. But in the wake of a 9-8 loss to the Kansas City Royals that featured their second implosion in 3 days, they also could be much, much better. The root cause of the Phillies' fourth loss of the season was simple: Cole Hamels did not have as much success adapting to umpire Eric Cooper's strike zone as did Royals righthander James Shields, who allowed four runs in the first inning and then put up zeroes in the next five.
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