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NEWS
April 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Pittsburgh and Philadelphia audiences know each other's sports teams more intimately than they know each other's orchestras. The explanation may be that the orchestras play in different leagues. The Pittsburgh Symphony played Thursday at West Chester University during a curious state tour in which it has presented pops programs under varied guest conductors. At West Chester, flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal conducted and was soloist in concertos by Mozart and Bach. It is clear that the symphony has made strides musically since Lorin Maazel became music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Trumpeting its 100th anniversary with a tour of musical capitals, the Pittsburgh Symphony brought a program of such ordinary fare to the Academy of Music on Thursday that it seemed to be celebrating inertia more than anything else. Too bad, because conductor Lorin Maazel has brought the ensemble out of its doldrums, added important players and shaped it into a crisp and responsive group. This is his farewell season with the symphony, and if he was summarizing his work and the orchestra's history with the Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5 and Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, he was conceding that he has nothing of importance to say for either.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
John Harbison's orchestral music is part of the older tradition in which large forces are used in shaping large ideas. His concertos and orchestral works exuberantly exceed the boundaries, as if the flow of inspiration is too strong for the form or the instrumentation to limit. One of these extravagances is his two-part ballet based on the Ulysses legend. The ballet's two parts, Ulysses' Raft and Ulysses' Bow, represent a full evening of dance, something in the mold of the Tchaikovsky narrative ballets.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Mariss Jansons began his tenure as conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Saturday, cheered on by a cohort of Norwegian fans and also by the players themselves. The 52-year-old music director-designate was greeted by a standing ovation at his first appearance, and after the last ripping chords of the Mahler Symphony No. 1, the audience was on its feet shouting, and the orchestra members were stomping their feet and applauding. The Latvian native has had the same effect in Norway, where he has been music director of the Oslo Philharmonic for 18 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestra conductors live by superlatives. Lorin Maazel, music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony and now the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, may live by the most superlatives. He is seen describing his glamorous life and conducting various orchestras in Maazel! A Profile of the Maestro, an hour-long paean to a healthy ego at 3 p.m. today on Channel 12. Unlike most of his colleagues, Maazel, now 62, was a conducting prodigy. He conducted an orchestra at the New York World's Fair in 1939 - at age 9. He conducted Toscanini's NBC Symphony at 11, the Philadelphia Orchestra at 14. He had led most of the great orchestras at an age when other musicians are only thinking about starting to conduct.
NEWS
August 5, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Music Critic
Despite the sky-blue brochure ballyhooing the presence of conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and the Pittsburgh Symphony, the roster of noted guest artists, the listing of educational programs for classical music and dance students at nearby Wheaton College, Great Woods Center for the Performing Arts is not in the music-festival business simply for the betterment of mankind. It's out to make money, too. And it has to be, for unlike most other summer arts facilities, such as Saratoga or Cleveland's Blossom, which are nonprofit organizations offering pop events to cover the cost of classical concerts, Great Woods is a rarity among serious-music sponsors - a for-profit venture.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
In more than 50 years of conducting, Lorin Maazel has appeared in Philadelphia as a prodigy in short velvet pants, as a smartly tailored young conductor on the rise, as a potential successor to Eugene Ormandy at the helm of the Philadelphia Orchestra, as a conductor of touring French orchestras and even as the leader of a Spectrum spectacular, a televised performance of Verdi's Messa da Requiem. Now, having just turned 60, he appears in a new role: music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony, which plays a rare performance tonight at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Antiphonal singing calls up images of misty basilicas, massed cassocks, ethereal sounds echoing in solemn rituals. Something of that came through in the concert last night by the Philadelphia Singers at the Church of the Holy Trinity. Robert Page, choral conductor here before leading the Cleveland Orchestra chorus, his own chamber choir and now the Pittsburgh Symphony's chorus, returned to conduct most of a program of antiphonal song. He had singers in the chancel, the balconies, the organ loft at the rear of the church, and for some of the program, timpani and peripatetic brass.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Lorin Maazel brought his Wagner synthesis, The Ring Without Words, to the Academy of Music last night along with the Pittsburgh Symphony. The Ring project is a fairly fascinating proposition: bringing Wagner's humongous orchestra up from the bowels of a darkened pit onto the glare of the stage where its ardent and heroic vocalism can be more readily appreciated. It's a boon for impatient souls, as it squeezes the tetralogy - four exceedingly long nights at the opera house - into a little over an hour.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
Odds are that 90 percent of the audience at the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra concert at the Academy of Music last night knew conductor Andre Previn by sight and sound because of his innumerable television appearances over the last few years. Most often associated in the past with the Pittsburgh Symphony, Previn now flies between Los Angeles and London as music director of the Los Angeles and Royal Philharmonic Orchestras, and this tour of the United States is his first with the Royal Philharmonic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THERE MAY BE some grumbling in the ranks of the Philadelphia Orchestra tonight, Ben Folds anticipates, when the sophisticated singer-songwriter/pianist, professorial talent judge ("The Sing-Off") and fledgling concerto composer meets up with our legendary symphony. "The Ben Folds Orchestral Experience" at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts will feature excerpts from Folds' new (first!) concerto, a big bunch of his pop gems - and one of the best and most serious backup bands in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
How nice. The Philadelphia Orchestra brought a bit of medium-weight summer entertainment to the dead of winter with Cirque de la Symphonie, a group of nine acrobats, aerialists, and jugglers performing with some surprisingly new, even challenging, music at Verizon Hall on the year's first weekend. Associate conductor Cristian Macelaru led pops repertoire such as Saint-Saens' "Bacchanale" from Samson and Delilah , mixed with more provocative works - George Antheil's Hot-Time Dance , Samuel Barber's "Hesitation Tango.
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beginning of the end for podium autocrats? Actually, it's been decades since conductors ruled with an iron baton, but the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra makes major-orchestra history in announcing that it will not be led by a single music director, but will split the podium three ways, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Sir Andrew Davis will become artistic adviser, programming in consultation with staff and musicians, Yan Pascal Tortelier will be principal guest conductor, and Marek Janowski will be guest conductor.
NEWS
March 9, 2003 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Roman Pawlowski discovered at an early age that music was a way of understanding the world. "When I was learning to read, I remember reading about ancient sailing ships and realizing reading could tell me all about the ships. It is the same with music," Pawlowski said. "Music to me is not just an entertainment of sound; it is a way of expanding one's experiences. . . . When I hear Debussy's 'La Mer,' I can feel the salt spray in my face, see the seagulls flying out from behind a cloud.
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Even fairly sophisticated orchestraphiles need to be reminded that Pennsylvania has two great orchestras, and Friday night in Verizon Hall they got all the reminding they're likely to need for a while. The Pittsburgh Symphony and conductor Mariss Jansons weighed in with a Brahms and Shostakovich powerhouse program that fairly eclipsed the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the last visitor on the Kimmel Center's visiting orchestra series. Maybe it's because Philadelphia is really the western-most city in New Jersey and Pittsburgh a thinly veiled Ohio, but the fact that the commonwealth has such incredible orchestral quality within state lines is rarely talked about.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
More than four decades after he first brought his Texas-size enthusiasm to bear on Temple University's choral singing, Robert Page is back to conduct that Texas-size monument, Mahler's Symphony No. 8, the "Symphony of a Thousand. " He'll conduct an expanded Delaware Symphony, the Choral Arts Society, the New York Choral Society and the American Boy Choir at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Academy of Music. There's a hint of deja vu in this undertaking: He last conducted the piece here in 1974 with the Pittsburgh Symphony in the Temple University Music Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Mariss Jansons began his tenure as conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Saturday, cheered on by a cohort of Norwegian fans and also by the players themselves. The 52-year-old music director-designate was greeted by a standing ovation at his first appearance, and after the last ripping chords of the Mahler Symphony No. 1, the audience was on its feet shouting, and the orchestra members were stomping their feet and applauding. The Latvian native has had the same effect in Norway, where he has been music director of the Oslo Philharmonic for 18 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Trumpeting its 100th anniversary with a tour of musical capitals, the Pittsburgh Symphony brought a program of such ordinary fare to the Academy of Music on Thursday that it seemed to be celebrating inertia more than anything else. Too bad, because conductor Lorin Maazel has brought the ensemble out of its doldrums, added important players and shaped it into a crisp and responsive group. This is his farewell season with the symphony, and if he was summarizing his work and the orchestra's history with the Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5 and Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, he was conceding that he has nothing of importance to say for either.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Philadelphia audiences are saying goodbye to five pillars of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Not in recent history have so many players in significant positions left the orchestra at the same time. Three principals - Frank Kaderabek, trumpet; Glenn Dodson, trombone, and Roger Scott, bass - are retiring, as are English hornist Louis Rosenblatt and violinist Julia Grayson-Standley. Scott, who is recovering from a stroke at his summer home in Cape May Point, has not appeared with the orchestra since February.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestra conductors live by superlatives. Lorin Maazel, music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony and now the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, may live by the most superlatives. He is seen describing his glamorous life and conducting various orchestras in Maazel! A Profile of the Maestro, an hour-long paean to a healthy ego at 3 p.m. today on Channel 12. Unlike most of his colleagues, Maazel, now 62, was a conducting prodigy. He conducted an orchestra at the New York World's Fair in 1939 - at age 9. He conducted Toscanini's NBC Symphony at 11, the Philadelphia Orchestra at 14. He had led most of the great orchestras at an age when other musicians are only thinking about starting to conduct.
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