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Pixies

NEWS
September 30, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was our very own Peter Pan, swinging through the air on a morning childrens' TV show whose theme and success were absolutely magical. From 1960 to 1970 in Philadelphia - and then for six years in New York and nationwide - she was the pixie queen of morning TV. She flew higher than the iconic Captain Kangaroo, who was on right after her, but who, of course, could only hop. With a sky-high 61 percent share of the early morning television audience,...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Every night Dimitri Coats would see them. He'd leave his post as bar back at the Khyber to empty the trash, and there they'd be, in the alley. People dressed in fashionable black. Lined up waiting to get into the dance club Live Bait, where no live music, just a DJ, was inside. "You couldn't help wondering what happened to rock and roll, seeing that," says Coats, 30, the singer, songwriter and guitarist of Burning Brides, the Philadelphia rock trio whose supercharged debut, Fall of the Plastic Empire (File 13)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether you call him Frank Black, Black Francis (his Pixies name, through which he made stultifyingly stop-start pop that would inform all that grunge would offer) or Charles Thompson, this influential guitarist/singer is the stuff of pulp fiction. As a Pixie famed for surreal, cryptic lyricism and screechy intertwined harmonies with a then-formidable Kim Deal, Black writhed through rapidly shifting dynamic rock-outs. Years after their demise, the Pixies still define American rock at its most crisply imaginative.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Modest Mouse is quite possibly the last guinea pig in the great, now largely abandoned, major-label alt-rock experiment. Throughout the '90s, the Big Five threw a lot of money at the kind of regular Joes who stand onstage wearing guitars and the T-shirts they woke up in, playing irregular and often transcendental rock music - with mixed commercial results. And no, we're not talking about Creed or matchbox twenty or Third Eye Blind, or any of the other modern-rockers disingenuously waving the flag of alternative.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | by Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
A greatest-hits compilation for an alternative band is an odd thing, especially for the likes of X, The Pixies and The Replacements, who influenced the sound of today's alternahits a decade ago, when the only place they made noise was on college radio and in smoke-filled clubs. Anthologizing groups like this is difficult because their fans were few but loyal and would go out of their way to track down anything their band put out. In most cases, these collections are for the curious, a good primer for those who weren't there the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1990 | By Fred Shuster, Los Angeles Daily News
A few years ago, Black Francis, vocalist and guitarist with the acclaimed alternative-rock band the Pixies, was told that when he was an infant, an unidentified flying object hovered over the house where he was staying in Nebraska. It's possible the UFO had no effect on Francis, but the music of the Pixies is definitely touched. On the quartet's latest album, "Bossanova," massive guitar textures and sweet melodies mingle as if stationed in an otherworldly vacuum. Irony abounds in the group's lyrics.
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | By Jim Gladstone, Special to The Inquirer
In an evening anything but catholic in its appeal, the British trio Love and Rockets and the brutish quartet the Pixies played Villanova University's Du Pont Pavilion Saturday night. Headliners Love and Rockets emitted a pretentious, messy spew of fuzzed-up bass and locked-up rhythm that surely inspired post-concert ear-cleaning. To purge oneself of the Pixies' vibes, however, would require a mighty long Q- Tip, one that reached all the way into the soul. The oddly named Boston-based Pixies (think of Tinkerbell wielding a chain saw)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Rock and roll doesn't come more pixilated or paradoxical than the Pixies, Boston's primo gift to the "Post Modern" (PoMo) rock revolution. With their heads suspended in a state of youthful disbelief, and their feet firmly planted in a cloud, the Pixies practice the art of survival with eccentric music and gallows humor, with cartoon gruesome songs like "Wave of Mutilation" and "Gouge Away," "I Bleed," "Dead" and "There Goes My Gun.' " All are...
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Does it hold up? (The heck with a fancy introduction, let's just get to the question you want answered first, right?) Of course it holds up: After an absence of 16 years, Peter Pan (Channel 3, 8 p.m. today) returns to television in the best possible way - with the luster of a classic and the energy of up-to-the-minute entertainment. So what if you, astute adult, can spot the strings attached to Mary Martin's back? Who Framed Roger Rabbit or Star Wars never mustered special effects with the emotional jolt of Peter Pan. If you don't get goose bumps the first time Martin's Peter Pan comes flying through the windows of the Darling children's bedroom - well then, you have no bumps to goose.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
"In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes," predicted pop culture maven Andy Warhol. For Whitesnake, tonight's headliner at the Spectrum, the clock is now officially running, although group founder David Coverdale has been flogging this serpent since the early days of the decade, touring relentlessly to build a following. "When I was thinking of forming Whitesnake, it was the height of the punk era and I was told nobody was interested in hard rock," says Britisher Coverdale, formerly the lead singer of Deep Purple.
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