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Pizzeria

NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gregory Andrews, a tall, slender 17-year-old, stepped to the witness stand yesterday and described the gunpoint robbery in which his best friend, Qa'id Staten, was slain. Staten, the 17-year-old son of a Philadelphia labor leader, was fatally shot April 27 as he and Andrews fled from a gunman outside a North Philadelphia pizzeria. Andrews said he first saw the defendant, 20-year-old Stephen Spurell of Brewerytown, inside Rainbow Pizza, 2223 Ridge Ave., about 9:30 p.m. "The Spurell dude - him right there - he came in," Andrews testified, pointing to the defendant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Take an interracial neighborhood on a summer day so hot that the sun blisters your soul. The heat has a way of magnifying your irritability, of searing your heart. You are a black deliveryman, and you can't fail to notice that all the police patrolling the street are white and regard you suspiciously, as though you were Willie Horton. Or you are a white shopkeeper, and you can't fail to notice that most of the patrons of your pizzeria are black and regard you suspiciously, as though you were Bernhard Goetz.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | By David Lee Preston and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
After years spent in and out of jail, Vinnie Marino seemed finally to have been trying to get it together. Recently he got a job as a cook at the Club Diner Restaurant on the Black Horse Pike in Bellmawr. Without a driver's license because of parole restrictions, he bought a black Schwinn Caliente bicycle and rode 20 minutes each way to work six nights a week. He even rode the bike to meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous, his landlord said. After work, Marino would ride back to Somerdale, stop at Moe & Antonio's Ristorante & Pizzeria on the White Horse Pike for an American hoagie, then go across the street to his home on Maiden Lane.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1970, Riccardo's Pizza opened in the Willingboro Plaza, the outdoor shopping center for Burlington County. The plaza's lively ambience and active commerce quickly made Riccardo's the pizzeria in that corner of the county. Today, Willingboro Plaza is an empty shell, a conglomeration of barren buildings and lost dreams. Like a loyal friend, Riccardo's stayed on - until this year, when plaza owners asked the pizzeria to leave. The 56-acre property along Route 130 is for sale.
NEWS
June 21, 2009 | By Rick Nichols INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
Stephen Starr took the boys (and a couple of girls) out for pizza Thursday. At 9:41 in the morning. For a clam pie, in New Haven, Conn., for goodness' sake, four hours and change by jouncing shuttle bus from his offices over the Continental in Old City. In the gray, drumming rain. He was so hungry by the time he got there that he did what any famished pizza-eater would do: He promptly, and with rueful chagrin, burned the roof of his mouth. And that was just pizzeria Numero Uno. There were four more to come on this gonzo pizza tour - back down in New York's East Village, and in Brooklyn, the harp wires of the bridge going hazy in the fading light.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
As one prosecutor put it, Thomas Kisselback knew where the dough was. But Kisselback's fondness for burglarizing pizzerias did not pay. In one, all he managed to gather was $10. In another, his take was a BB gun. For both, he earned three to 15 years in state prison. Kisselback, 38, of the 400 block of Dugan Street in Philadelphia, was sentenced Thursday after pleading guilty to charges that included burglary, theft and receiving stolen property. According to court records, Kisselback was first arrested on Nov. 18, 1989.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1987 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mom's Pizza Inc. has sound reasons for developing the way it has. It's the product that is half-baked. It used to be a conventional pizzeria operation, founded by Nicholas Castellucci in Manayunk in 1961. Then "in 1979 I decided, why can't people take our product home and bake it?" Castellucci says. "I'm pretty sure I was the first in the country" to concentrate exclusively on the bake-at-home concept. Mom may have been first, but she's not alone now. There are five Pizza & More Stores in New Jersey with a similar concept, and 11 more are planned to open by the end of the year throughout the Philadelphia area.
FOOD
February 21, 2013
The stretch of South Street from Broad Street west into Grays Ferry has been growing as a food destination, what with such recent arrivals as the Cambridge , Magpie Artisan Pie Boutique , Sawatdee , and the Quick Fixx , and with the second location of Honey's Sit 'n Eat opening shortly at 21st and South Streets. Saturday will see the debut of Miles Table at 1620 South St. (267-318-7337), a cozy, neighborhood-friendly spot from Michael Lynch, whose business Catering by Miles counts for much of the reason people want to join Lombard Swim Club, where he's the exclusive caterer.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone likes pizza. Well, almost everyone. William Woys Weaver of Devon, a food historian and author of seven books on food - a man who has savored a colonial-era dish made of pig's ears - considers eating the venerable tomato-and-cheese pie a desperate act. "Once on a talk show," Weaver said, "I was asked the meaning of 'emergency food.' I said in Holland during World War II, people ate tulip bulbs. For me, it's pizza. It's too salty. I guess it's the cheese I don't like.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
My friend Ed Levine grabs a slice by its puffy outer lip, lifts it high over the table, and peers at its crusty underside with the knowing eyes of a mechanic looking under the hood of a tomato-red sports coupe. "Uh-huh . . . " he says softly, examining the margherita at Pizzeria Stella and starting to tick through his checklist. The "leoparding" is gorgeous, he says, indicating the perfect constellation of charry dots and heat blisters scattered across the crust. There's a nice rise to the edge, which inflates like a bike tire around the pie. And then there is the chew, a distinct yet delicate outer crisp, giving way to an inner tenderness that has just the right amount of salt and a roasty hint of wood smoke.
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