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NEWS
April 30, 2013
IT'S SPRING, AND along with the crocuses, something else is in bloom. Up and down the avenues and boulevards, after a winter of hibernation, sidewalk cafes have returned. They add color and life to city streets, all good. But a handful of arrogant businesses think they own the sidewalk, treat it as their personal for-profit turf. Such as Pizzicato, at the corner of 3rd and Market, a chronic offender that upped the ante last week by adding wood planters, actually creating a blockade of the Market Street sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No one can accuse Vadim Repin of jumping the gun on an encore. Unlike some other soloists, whose encores are not quite justified by the enthusiasm or persistence of the audience, Repin disappeared for what seemed like a long minute after his Sibelius Violin Concerto Thursday night with the Philadelphia Orchestra, leaving the audience in a state of sustained anticipation. Maybe he was backstage gathering up two or three other violinists for an assist, since that's the only reasonable explanation for the flood of notes in Paganini's Introduction and Variations on "Nel cor pi? non mi sento" from Paisiello's "La molinara.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
American pianist Brian Ganz and French violinist Stephane Tran Ngoc have recorded the Schumann violin sonatas together, and they played one of them yesterday in their recital at the Academy of Music ballroom. Theirs is an intriguing pairing of musical personalities. Ganz is an exuberant player given to flourishes and heroics, Tran Ngoc is contained and something of a classicist in his approach to romantic music. Their program also included sonatas by Beethoven and Ravel, and along the way, Ganz gave the impression that he had turned his bag of music inside out, while the violinist still had some things in reserve.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
He seemed, at first, like one kind of cellist, and then another. Until the end of his Sunday afternoon recital at Independence Seaport Museum, when you realized that Jan Vogler was intent on crafting stylistic approaches so different to each composer, you might have been left searching for the musician's core personality. With sturdy and accommodating pianist Louis Lortie as his partner, the cellist with a sweet smile and a straight mop of sandy hair limited his range of colors in Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 69)
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The viola d'amore played a central role in the opening concert of the Penn Contemporary Players last night at Swarthmore College. Both David Finko's Concerto for Viola d'Amore and Guitar and Richard Wernick's Music for Viola d'Amore featured the elegant playing of Daniel Fradkin. Wernick cast the instrument in a terse role in which flashes of brilliance alternated with introverted playing that exalted the rich sound of the instrument. Finko clothed it in neo-medieval trappings.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
TOM TAKES HARRY'S Tom Cunningham, easy-going owner of the long-running Who's On Third, 700 S. 3rd St., plans to open Cunningham's Bar & Grill, 22 S. 18th St., in Harry's Bar & Grill's old digs, by mid-October. He's signed an agreement of sale with Harry's owner Kathleen Mulhern (now focused on just The Garden, 1617 Spruce St.) and is waiting on the liquor license OK so he can open his Irish hangout, serving reasonably priced pub fare and featuring a DJ and dancing upstairs three nights a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
David Baker likes to tease. He lays out a little Bill Evans piano part and then yanks it away. A pizzicato violin solo is sweet; before long, though, a shadow of dissonance begins to follow along in the piano part. But Roots II, played Sunday afternoon at the Philadelphia Orchestra's chamber-music series, is hardly schizophrenic. The five-movement work for violin, cello and piano is a masterpiece of fusion. Baker balances jazz and a modern classical idiom as skillfully as Bartok blended folk music into his musical language.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to the Inquirer
An admirer of Mozart's Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551 is always happy to tell you about the work's stirring first movement, its poetic second and its ebullient third. But when it comes time to talk about the last movement, his eyes open wide, pulse quickens, and he looks at you as if the meaning of life is about to be revealed. No doubt, it is a magical movement. Musicologists have their own theories for placing it among the most important in the symphonic literature, but at the heart of the matter is a reason anyone with two ears can understand.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gregory Fulkerson has commissioned his share of music - works from composers Richard Wernick, John Deak and others. "I nearly always have something in the fire," says the violinist. But Donald Erb's Sonata was written for him without his knowledge. "It just appeared on my doorstep before Christmas last year," recalls Fulkerson, who will play the work in two Network for New Music concerts this weekend. "Erb got pneumonia in the fall of 1993, was very sick for a while, and was depressed in general, and for some reason he decided to write this piece and didn't tell me. " Fulkerson had worked on developing new pieces with Erb before, as he has with many contemporary composers.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Clearly recognizable as a piece of minimalism, Aaron Kernis' Music for Trio (Cycle IV), which the Huntingdon Trio performed yesterday at the Ethical Society, nevertheless vividly shares the impulses of the romantic tradition. Its patterned terraces are not so much plateaus as steps leading to and from a hierarchical structure. (Or to modify the conceit: Think of minimalism as a ranch-style house, romanticism as a Victorian.) Despite its sparely motivic, pattern-regurgitative nature, Kernis' piece ebbs and flows in such a way as to allow a wider dynamic range within each section.
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NEWS
April 30, 2013
IT'S SPRING, AND along with the crocuses, something else is in bloom. Up and down the avenues and boulevards, after a winter of hibernation, sidewalk cafes have returned. They add color and life to city streets, all good. But a handful of arrogant businesses think they own the sidewalk, treat it as their personal for-profit turf. Such as Pizzicato, at the corner of 3rd and Market, a chronic offender that upped the ante last week by adding wood planters, actually creating a blockade of the Market Street sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2011 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
A richly curtained proscenium would have been all wrong, but the long, white, high-ceilinged room - once a fish refrigerator - was a provocative setting Sunday for the JACK Quartet's survey of the intricate, still music of the New York School. The players, ringed by listeners, played music by Morton Feldman, Earle Brown, John Cage - and Anton Webern - in the second American Sublime festival event, at the Crane Center in Northern Liberties. The program summarized the revolutionary thought of the mid-20th century, when composers rebelled against every element of Western music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No one can accuse Vadim Repin of jumping the gun on an encore. Unlike some other soloists, whose encores are not quite justified by the enthusiasm or persistence of the audience, Repin disappeared for what seemed like a long minute after his Sibelius Violin Concerto Thursday night with the Philadelphia Orchestra, leaving the audience in a state of sustained anticipation. Maybe he was backstage gathering up two or three other violinists for an assist, since that's the only reasonable explanation for the flood of notes in Paganini's Introduction and Variations on "Nel cor pi? non mi sento" from Paisiello's "La molinara.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
He seemed, at first, like one kind of cellist, and then another. Until the end of his Sunday afternoon recital at Independence Seaport Museum, when you realized that Jan Vogler was intent on crafting stylistic approaches so different to each composer, you might have been left searching for the musician's core personality. With sturdy and accommodating pianist Louis Lortie as his partner, the cellist with a sweet smile and a straight mop of sandy hair limited his range of colors in Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 69)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
By all accounts, Doug Wright is a pleasant, reasonably normal fellow. Put a writing implement at his command, though, and he becomes one weird, unsettling dude. Yet, although he pushes his characters into realms well beyond human understanding, he does so with a benign cheerfulness that makes standard responses such as fright or revulsion seem somehow too simple. In Quills, his play about the Marquis de Sade that the Wilma Theater produced three seasons back, the Marquis was such a charming chap that he forced you to reexamine your notions about the nature of evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
David Baker likes to tease. He lays out a little Bill Evans piano part and then yanks it away. A pizzicato violin solo is sweet; before long, though, a shadow of dissonance begins to follow along in the piano part. But Roots II, played Sunday afternoon at the Philadelphia Orchestra's chamber-music series, is hardly schizophrenic. The five-movement work for violin, cello and piano is a masterpiece of fusion. Baker balances jazz and a modern classical idiom as skillfully as Bartok blended folk music into his musical language.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
TOM TAKES HARRY'S Tom Cunningham, easy-going owner of the long-running Who's On Third, 700 S. 3rd St., plans to open Cunningham's Bar & Grill, 22 S. 18th St., in Harry's Bar & Grill's old digs, by mid-October. He's signed an agreement of sale with Harry's owner Kathleen Mulhern (now focused on just The Garden, 1617 Spruce St.) and is waiting on the liquor license OK so he can open his Irish hangout, serving reasonably priced pub fare and featuring a DJ and dancing upstairs three nights a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bassist Cecil McBee possesses a strong sense of history - the history that helped mold him as well as the place he occupies in the history of jazz. McBee was born in 1935 in Tulsa, Okla., which, because of the booming oil industry, was an economic powerhouse despite the Depression. But more than a decade earlier, Tulsa was the site of one of the most horrific race riots in American history. An African American neighborhood in Tulsa known as "the black Wall Street" was "sovereign and self-sufficient," said McBee, and was under attack from racists jealous of its success.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Giampaola Duva's family had been in the pizzeria business for a number of years. They had shops in New Jersey and one in the city. On a summer evening, taking a break from slapping pizza dough, Duva went for a stroll along Market Street, in Old City. "What a great area," he thought. And then he saw a vacant building at the corner of Third and Market. "Wouldn't this be a great spot for a . . . " Pizzeria? "No. When I first looked at the space, I didn't think a conventional pizzeria would be the way to go. "I always wanted to do something like [the place]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
American pianist Brian Ganz and French violinist Stephane Tran Ngoc have recorded the Schumann violin sonatas together, and they played one of them yesterday in their recital at the Academy of Music ballroom. Theirs is an intriguing pairing of musical personalities. Ganz is an exuberant player given to flourishes and heroics, Tran Ngoc is contained and something of a classicist in his approach to romantic music. Their program also included sonatas by Beethoven and Ravel, and along the way, Ganz gave the impression that he had turned his bag of music inside out, while the violinist still had some things in reserve.
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