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NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Regional grid operator PJM Interconnection says it authorized more than 750 electric transmission improvement projects last year costing more than $5 billion to prepare for massive shifts in the way power is produced in the region. PJM, which is based in Valley Forge, said the unprecedented switch from older coal-burning power plants in Appalachia to new natural-gas and renewable energy projects is driving the need to reconfigure the grid to maintain a reliable electricity supply.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection's board on Thursday authorized 11 improvements to the electrical transmission grid in its 13-state region. The regional grid manager, which is based in Valley Forge, said the projects are expected to cost $59 million and will yield $815 million in savings over 15 years. The projects, which are enhancements to the existing transmission system rather than new lines, include three upgrades in Pennsylvania, all located near the Susquehanna River south of Harrisburg.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
It could have been worse. You could have been in Saudi Arabia, where the temperature was 104 degrees yesterday. The electric company probably wishes you were. "It was a tense afternoon," said Peco Energy public relations manager David Hackney. But the temperature climbed to only 88 - five degees below the record of 93 set in 1936 - and customers apparently heeded the utility's pleas to conserve. The utility avoided any voltage reductions or temporary service interruptions, still the utility yesterday afternoon hit a record for usage in May. Demand reached 6,800 megawatts, Hackney said.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection, the regional electricity grid operator, has called on customers to conserve power on Tuesday, when arctic conditions are expected to push demand to the limits of the transmission system. The grid on Tuesday evening is projected to surpass the winter demand record set on Jan. 7, said Paula DuPont-Kidd, a PJM spokeswoman. Utilities are asking consumers to conserve electricity especially from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Tuesday as well as from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Utilities urged electric heating customer to set their thermostats lower than usual, if health permits, to turn off unneeded lights and appliances, and to delay using major appliances like stoves, dishwashers and clothes dryers.
NEWS
August 13, 2006
What a difference three years can make. A cascading blackout, caused by inadequate tree trimming, poor employee training and computer failure, thrust the Northeast into darkness on the mild summer evening of Aug. 14, 2003. This summer, a nationwide heat wave pushed utilities to their limits not once but repeatedly. PJM Interconnection - a grid traffic cop that coordinates the transmission of electricity for 51 million customers in 13 states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey - set a usage record July 17, only to break it Aug. 1, and then again the next day. So far in '06, the national system has strained, but largely withstood the pressure.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2006 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The parent of Peco Energy Co. yesterday unplugged its $17 billion bid to acquire Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. after failing to reach a deal with New Jersey utility regulators. Exelon Corp. had counted on the merger to give it scale in one of the nation's largest power grids. The Chicago company, which threatened in August to pull the plug on the deal, would not comment on its plans. "We are very disappointed that the merger cannot be completed," John W. Rowe, Exelon's chairman and chief executive officer, said in a statement released after the stock market had closed.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
PJM Interconnection said yesterday that, as electricity use soared Wednesday, the region's power grid set a record in the amount of peak need that was met by so-called demand response, in which power customers are paid market rates to curtail consumption. With high temperatures and humidity across the eastern portion of its 13-state electricity pool, PJM said demand topped 139,700 megawatts - less than the record of 144,644 megawatts set Aug. 2, 2006, but the highest so far this year.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NewPower Holdings Inc. said yesterday that it was in discussions to be acquired by a British utility for about $66 million. The electricity and natural gas retailer has 680,000 customers in five states, including 192,000 electricity customers in the Philadelphia area. A spokeswoman said its customers would not be affected by the possible sale. The company, which was started in January 2000, has had cash-flow concerns for the last year, and it is 44 percent owned by Enron Corp.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The threat of rolling blackouts or voltage cutbacks eased late yesterday as clouds and rain cooled off portions of central Pennsylvania and eastern Maryland. The temperatures in the Philadelphia region are expected to soar well above 90 degrees today and tomorrow, again putting extreme demands on the region's electric-power grid. The Philadelphia Health Department and National Weather Service in Mount Holly yesterday issued an excessive-heat warning for the weekend. The heat index, which is a combination of humidity and air temperature, could hit 105 today, officials said.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of it as Mother Nature's economic stimulus. Electricity consumption has dropped dramatically this summer because of the mild weather, and it is translating into more manageable electric bills. PJM Interconnection, the regional grid operator, says electricity demand in the mid-Atlantic states was down 13.5 percent in June compared with last year. Peco Energy Co. customers used 14.9 percent less power in June than they did a year ago, and sales are off 2.5 percent for the first six months of the year, according to PJM. Public Service Electric & Gas, the New Jersey utility, sold 17 percent less power in June, and 4.5 percent less for the year.
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NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection's board on Thursday authorized 11 improvements to the electrical transmission grid in its 13-state region. The regional grid manager, which is based in Valley Forge, said the projects are expected to cost $59 million and will yield $815 million in savings over 15 years. The projects, which are enhancements to the existing transmission system rather than new lines, include three upgrades in Pennsylvania, all located near the Susquehanna River south of Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection, Inc., the regional grid operator based in Valley Forge, on Wednesday appointed an insider as its next chief executive officer. Andrew L. Ott, the executive vice president for markets, was picked to succeed Terry Boston when he retires at the end of 2015. Boston, who has led PJM since 2008, was previously executive vice president of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Ott, an 18-year PJM veteran, previously worked in transmission planning and operations at General Public Utilities.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fights between financial businesses and their regulators usually take place in the dark, at least until there are charges, or a settlement. But last week owners of two private companies pushed their struggles against what they claim is overbearing government into the public eye: Energy trades. Together, twins Kevin and Richard Gates learned math at Conestoga High School, earned chemical engineering degrees at the University of Virginia, and helped found TFS Capital of West Chester, where they and their partners manage more than $1 billion in other people's money.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection, the regional electricity grid operator, has called on customers to conserve power on Tuesday, when arctic conditions are expected to push demand to the limits of the transmission system. The grid on Tuesday evening is projected to surpass the winter demand record set on Jan. 7, said Paula DuPont-Kidd, a PJM spokeswoman. Utilities are asking consumers to conserve electricity especially from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Tuesday as well as from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Utilities urged electric heating customer to set their thermostats lower than usual, if health permits, to turn off unneeded lights and appliances, and to delay using major appliances like stoves, dishwashers and clothes dryers.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
An innovative energy-storage company back from bankruptcy is building a plant in Northeastern Pennsylvania to store electrical power in speedy spinning flywheels. Beacon Power L.L.C. on Friday will install the first of 200 flywheels in a nondescript industrial park near Hazleton. The $53 million storage system is capable of discharging 20 megawatts of electricity into the grid at a moment's notice - the equivalent of a burst of energy from a small power plant. Flywheels have been used for storing energy for a long time - think of a potter's wheel.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Regional grid operator PJM Interconnection says it authorized more than 750 electric transmission improvement projects last year costing more than $5 billion to prepare for massive shifts in the way power is produced in the region. PJM, which is based in Valley Forge, said the unprecedented switch from older coal-burning power plants in Appalachia to new natural-gas and renewable energy projects is driving the need to reconfigure the grid to maintain a reliable electricity supply.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lot of energy is wasted each time a train stops at one of the 28 stations on SEPTA's Market-Frankford Line. In a six-car train, the brakes produce about 3 million watts of power during the 15 seconds it takes to halt the 400 tons of hurtling metal, plastic and humanity. Some of the electricity is reused by other trains on the line. Much of the power is lost — dissipated as hot air through the subway car's rooftop vents. But what if the electricity produced by the train's regenerative brakes could be captured and reused, as it is with a hybrid vehicle?
BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | Michael Armstrong
Computer technology has trumped all the mental pictures I have of what a "control room" should look like. On Monday, I visited the Navy Yard's new Network Operations Center (NOC) to see what's expected to be a showcase for how "smart grid" technologies will perform at the growing urban office and industrial park. But instead of a wall-size map of the Navy Yard or a long control board with switches and blinking lights, the room on the first floor of Building 101 looked like the classroom it was, albeit with some funky strings of LED lighting.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
My clothes washing machine has a feature that allows me to feel marvelously virtuous. It's a timer. My routine is to load the machine in the evening, have it run in the wee hours, and then hang the clothes in the morning. But is this just a feel-good gesture? I hold that it makes a difference, that it's the next level of wise energy use. Using less energy overall is certainly a worthy goal. The way to make an even bigger difference is to use less energy at specific times - those "peak" hours when so many other pieces of machinery are sucking down the juice.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Ryan Flaim got word in late fall that a high-voltage power line was planned along the edge of his family's Cumberland County farm, he was incensed, but he doubted there was any way to stop it. Atlantic City Electric, with the law on its side, wanted to install a 10-mile transmission line in the middle of rural eastern Vineland. Pete Steenland, a prominent businessman in town, already was organizing residents in opposition. Despite his skepticism, Flaim joined in. Then something unexpected happened.
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