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Placards

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NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Mayfair business district, the Flags and the Placards slug it out. No, two gangs haven't converged there for a turf battle. Rather, merchants continue to debate whether bright yellow flags or new placards should decorate the main shopping strips of Mayfair on Frankford Avenue and Cottman Avenue. The issue arose out of discontent among the merchants because they can't put up holiday lights. Some merchants want to get rid of the flags and install lighted signs that also would provide the wiring they need for holiday lights.
NEWS
August 19, 2008
I'M WRITING on behalf of all handicapped people who have handicap plates (not placards) on their cars. It is a shame that PennDOT can't screen people with placards, as it seems that anyone and his uncle can get one. Just fill out the form and get someone pretending to be a doctor or police officer to sign it. Send it to PennDOT, get the placard and pass it on to friends or relatives so they can park in handicap areas or get out of the car and...
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Parking Authority began telling contractors yesterday that it had scrapped its unpopular policy, adopted just last month, of charging $960 a year for a placard allowing some trucks to park for free in Center City. On Monday, a day after The Inquirer reported that the formerly free placards would cost $480 every six months as of July 1, the authority concluded that it had erred, said Linda J. Miller, a spokeswoman for the independent city agency. Council members and contractors had objected to the plan.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
Sen. Arlen Specter, with his wife, Joan, is surrounded by supporters, including Nancy Ortega (right) of Oxford, at the Republican National Committee meeting in the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel. Some placards hailed his abortion-rights stance.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | BY SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Residents in the 4500 block of G Street, armed with lawn chairs and placards, today protest an infestation of rats from the old Harrowgate incinerator on the 4700 block. Neighbors demanding a cleanup say people have been leaving waste outside the fence of the facility, which has been used recently only as a refuse transfer station.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | BY JULIANA REYES
PARKING ain't easy down in South Philly. On rough nights, you might have to circle a dozen times and smoke a coupla cigarettes before you find a spot three blocks from your house. Unless you're an off-duty police officer willing to bend the rules. In that case, Help Desk learned this week, there's a loophole in the city's parking enforcement big enough to park your car. For most people, an illegal spot isn't worth it. Philadelphia Parking Authority officers stalk the streets.
NEWS
January 27, 2004 | Signe Wilkinson
SENDING another journalist to New Hampshire is like sending another FBI agent to Philadelphia City Hall. The place is already crawling with them. So, the Daily News sent a cartoonist. The big story is that New Hampshire is cold. Colder than Philadelphia. Minus 3 degrees-in-the-sun cold. It hasn't stopped intrepid bands of political activists and just plain people from standing outside leafleting, planting signs along snowy dirt roads, and waving placards from corners. No matter who wins the Democratic primary tonight, they feel sure they have the winning candidate.
NEWS
April 25, 1986
If a well-known local gang had planted a bomb in a Philadelphia disco and had killed and injured a number of persons, people would be upset if there were no arrests. And especially so if it was common knowledge that the same gang had planted a bomb in the subway that killed four, and that these criminals had opened fire when the police came looking for them. Under these circumstances the public would be demanding that the police do something. And when the police finally did act, I doubt that even University of Pennsylvania students would be marching with placards condemning the police for having brought these criminals to justice.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Looking for a parking spot near Center City? Try Callowhill near Broad. On Monday, most of the parking spots on Callowhill were filled with cars bearing handicapped plates or placards, allowing them to park for free at expired meters. On Tuesday, the Daily News reported that many of those cars were driven by employees of the Philadelphia Parking Authority, apparently healthy folk who write parking tickets, haul change away from parking meters and hold lots of other patronage jobs.
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whatever their ailments may have been, thousands of people who once claimed handicaps so as to park all day for free at meters in Center City apparently have been cured. Or maybe they're just parking somewhere else. This wonder has been accomplished by a simple city ordinance that last year rescinded free all-day parking for vehicles bearing handicapped tags and placards. City Council adopted the law in the belief that disabled-parking privileges were being widely abused.
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NEWS
September 23, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
IF YOU THOUGHT all those apocalyptic warnings about not parking on certain Center City streets during Pope Week didn't apply to you, then you're probably among the dozens of people looking for a ride to pick up your car. If you're looking for a hotel room, however, you're blessed. There's still room at the inn for you, according to the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association, which represents Center City establishments. As of yesterday afternoon, 124 cars had been towed by the Philadelphia Parking Authority, said deputy executive director Richard Dickson.
SPORTS
August 6, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
RECENTLY, THERE was some concern that NFL officials wouldn't let Eagles coach Chip Kelly dictate the pace of the game via his up-tempo offense. It ended up being a non-story. He said he understands the NFL rules and will have no trouble following them. After all, Kelly ran a blistering-quick offense at Oregon and never had any trouble there. That's not good news for opposing teams. Former Oregon center Jordon Holmes tells a story about how the Ducks were playing Tennessee when, in the third quarter, a Volunteers' defensive end said to him, "If you guys run two more plays at this speed.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | BY JULIANA REYES
PARKING ain't easy down in South Philly. On rough nights, you might have to circle a dozen times and smoke a coupla cigarettes before you find a spot three blocks from your house. Unless you're an off-duty police officer willing to bend the rules. In that case, Help Desk learned this week, there's a loophole in the city's parking enforcement big enough to park your car. For most people, an illegal spot isn't worth it. Philadelphia Parking Authority officers stalk the streets.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
About 100 demonstrators gathered in Center City Wednesday evening to protest the scheduled execution of Troy Davis in Georgia. The protest had been announced on Twitter and other social media outlets earlier, but the crowd took police by surprise. Traffic was briefly shut down on 15th Street near City Hall. The protesters grudgingly complied with police orders to only cross the street during green lights. They waved placards and chanted for the release of Davis, who was to be executed at 7 p.m. Wednesday for the 1989 slaying of an off-duty police officer.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The folks desperate to save the Stiffel senior center were handed a tough numbers problem this spring: Raise $200,000 in two months, or say good-bye to the multicultural mecca at Marshall and Porter. With only $20,000 in hand this week, and the June 30 deadline looming, the South Philly center's supporters decided to pose a question of their own: What do you get when you hand placards to three dozen elderly people and ask them to walk in a circle for an hour in the noonday sun?
NEWS
September 16, 2010
LETTER-writer Robert Schloss wrote that "Teachers have an allotted number of personal days, and it's not for the district or the Daily News to scrutinize when teachers use what they're entitled to. " It certainly is the business of the school district and the Daily News . Taxpayers pay teachers' salaries, and they have a right to know what they're paying for. Private industry generally requires personal days to be requested in advance....
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mayor Nutter took office, he reduced the number of free parking spaces awarded to city employees and to politically connected local VIPs. But a lucky few got to keep their free spots, even though they don't work for the city. Michael Meehan, general counsel for the Republican City Committee, still parks for free in the 1500 block of Market Street. He did not return a call seeking comment. Democratic City Committee Chairman and U.S. Rep. Bob Brady nabbed a space, as did Elmer Brun, Charles Bernard, and Lou Farinella, who also work for the local party as aides to Brady.
NEWS
September 10, 2008
RE THE letter "Fighting Abuse of Handicapped-parking Placards": I went to a local movie complex and was approaching a handicapped parking space when another car got there first. Oh, well, sometimes I got there first. What stunned me was when I observed a young man and woman in their early 20s jump out of the car and start running to the theater while holding hands. Ah, their youthful hearts! But not handicapped bodies! I seriously doubt that the placard belonged to that driver, passenger or car. In Center City, I've seen small commercial trucks with a handicapped placard, while the occupant was a young seemingly healthy male.
NEWS
August 19, 2008
I'M WRITING on behalf of all handicapped people who have handicap plates (not placards) on their cars. It is a shame that PennDOT can't screen people with placards, as it seems that anyone and his uncle can get one. Just fill out the form and get someone pretending to be a doctor or police officer to sign it. Send it to PennDOT, get the placard and pass it on to friends or relatives so they can park in handicap areas or get out of the car and...
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's ordinance prohibiting signs on utility poles and street signs might make for a neater landscape, but it violates the First Amendment when applied to political advertisements, argues a federal suit brought by an unsuccessful City Council candidate. The lawsuit, filed Oct. 30, says that a right-of-way next to a public street is a "classic public forum" for political speech, and the only reasonable advertising alternative for many candidates in local races. Plaintiff Damon K. Roberts was challenging City Council President Anna Verna in the May 15 Democratic primary, and he was assessed $4,750 in fines about one week before the polls opened.
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