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Placement

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NEWS
December 25, 1986
The Department of Human Services' actions in placing and keeping a young black child with a white foster couple and then removing him from them, raises serious questions not only about the judgment of those involved but also about the underlying policies of the agency. The issues of transracial placement, indeed of placement itself, are complicated and sensitive. So too is the life of each child placed in care. The need for policies that make sense generally but from which there can be exceptions is clear.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By JACK SMITH For the Daily News
IN THE LATEST James Bond epic "Casino Royale," the very first vehicle the British action hero wheels across the terrain isn't some sleek, luxurious Aston Martin, Jaguar or BMW touring car; instead, it's a bright, yellow earth mover that lays waste to everything in its way. In case you missed the point, the manufacturer's name - New Holland - is neatly painted across the big scraper blade and fills the screen for several raucous, heart-pounding moments....
NEWS
April 15, 2011
ALTOONA, Pa. - On April 27 there will still be a city with roughly 31,000 residents in the Allegheny Mountains about 85 miles east of Pittsburgh. What there won't be is a city named Altoona. That's because the city has sold its name for two months to make some money - and to help independent filmmaker Morgan Spurlock make a point. The Altoona Mirror reports that the city council on Wednesday approved a deal to change the city's name to "POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the ladies of Wisteria Lane strode the runway in a charity fashion show on ABC's Desperate Housewives, they wore Halston gowns. Like their kitchens furnished by Thermador and Bosch, and the Buick LaCrosse that Gabrielle posed alongside for a modeling gig, the Halstons were product placements, little commercials embedded in scripts in exchange for goods or money. Such placements aren't new - remember Seinfeld's Snapple and Junior Mints? But their numbers are exploding as programmers seek new revenue to meet rising production costs and advertisers try to counter fragmenting audiences and ad-skipping technology such as the TiVo and similar recorders, which cable and satellite firms are increasingly providing to customers.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The Phoenixville Historic District has been nominated for placement on the National Register of Historic Places, the Chester County Board of Commissioners announced yesterday. The district, known for its broad range of outstanding late 19th- and early 20th-century styles of architecture, contains 960 structures and includes 297 acres. It would be the largest historic district in Chester County and second in size to the Norristown Historic District in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state Public Welfare Department paid $3,300 per placement to a nonprofit Philadelphia group that found jobs for welfare recipients primarily in newspaper advertisements. The contract with New Jobs Inc. of Philadelphia spanned a two-year period ending in December. During that time, the state paid New Jobs nearly $373,000 to place 113 recipients. Though the intent of the no-bid contract was to place the recipients in jobs with newly created minority- and female-owned firms, state records show that many of the placements claimed were with retail establishments and fast- food chains.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two private foster-care agencies that stopped accepting Philadelphia children because the city had failed to pay for services including placement said yesterday that they would resume working with the city after having been assured by officials that the money would be paid. Both agencies - Tabor Children Services of Doylestown, which halted its Philadelphia placements Tuesday, and Concern, a Reading agency that began refusing Philadelphia children in February - have been contracting with the city Department of Human Services to operate group homes and place children with foster parents in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
October 23, 2014
DOES YOUR TV-watching reflect your politics? Those who buy and place political ads think it does. And, as viewing habits continue to disperse among hundreds of cable choices, political parties and groups behind so-called independent expenditures are increasingly targeting ad buys to specific channels. This is the new TV campaign. Cable is cheaper and offers niche programming. When that's coupled with advances in technology, as in "we know what you're watching," guess what?
NEWS
July 27, 2001
[W]eren't we finally done with these guys? Despite respectful nods - such as the dutiful placement of Sgt. Pepper's, that largely unlistened-to and virtually unlistenable record, at the very top of lists of "greatest rock albums" - Beatlemania had finally become as worn out as . . . Father McKenzie's socks. Now it's back. Nick Gillespie, "The Long and Whining Road" Reason, June 2001
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE WE marvel that there are 30 percent fewer Philly kids in foster care or delinquent placement today than three years ago, let's marvel that Rashan Clarke survived the system at all. From the age of 3 months until he aged out of foster care last year, Rashan, 18, bounced from placement to placement. A few of his caregivers were well-intentioned, he says, but those relationships were short-lived. Mostly, he endured abuse or neglect by people who were supposed to protect and care for him. "Too many of them are just in it for the money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2014
DOES YOUR TV-watching reflect your politics? Those who buy and place political ads think it does. And, as viewing habits continue to disperse among hundreds of cable choices, political parties and groups behind so-called independent expenditures are increasingly targeting ad buys to specific channels. This is the new TV campaign. Cable is cheaper and offers niche programming. When that's coupled with advances in technology, as in "we know what you're watching," guess what?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Quason, 13, and Daequan, 11, share not only the same foster placement but also almost all the same interests and goals, so close are the brothers. Both are passionate about sports and dream of playing professionally some day in either the NBA or the NFL. They enjoy testing their skill at video games, riding bikes, listening to music - Daequan also aspires to a career in rap - and eating chicken and seafood. Quason and Daequan agree that their prized possession is the iPod, that making the basketball league is their proudest achievement, and that Christmas is their favorite holiday.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When something like 40 million Americans watch the Oscars on a Sunday night - and when more than 100 million watch the Super Bowl, as they did earlier this winter - Eddie Decker and his team of analysts from Front Row Marketing in South Philly are watching the watchers. At the firm's "war room" at Comcast-Spectacor's Wells Fargo Center, and on site at the events, they watch the shows and the brand-name products in ads, the paid placements and accidental appearances throughout the programming.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Education Law Center of Pennsylvania is expected to ask the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday to conduct a civil rights investigation into the placement of Pennsylvania students in state-funded alternative-education programs. The complaint being lodged with the civil rights division alleges that school districts across the state are removing a disproportionately high number of African American students and those with special needs from their regular schools and placing them in "educationally inferior" alternative-education programs, including disciplinary schools.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Sandusky will not go directly to a permanent cell in Pennsylvania's prison system, a corrections official said after his sentencing Tuesday. First, he must undergo a 30-day assessment at Camp Hill Correctional Facility that will decide his ultimate placement among the state's 27 prisons. Sue Bensinger, deputy press secretary for the Department of Corrections, said Sandusky was being remanded to Camp Hill to face the same diagnostic and classification process as any other prisoner.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE WE marvel that there are 30 percent fewer Philly kids in foster care or delinquent placement today than three years ago, let's marvel that Rashan Clarke survived the system at all. From the age of 3 months until he aged out of foster care last year, Rashan, 18, bounced from placement to placement. A few of his caregivers were well-intentioned, he says, but those relationships were short-lived. Mostly, he endured abuse or neglect by people who were supposed to protect and care for him. "Too many of them are just in it for the money.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2011
"I simply do not know where the money is, or why the accounts have not been reconciled to date. I apologize, both personally and on behalf of the company, to our customers, our employees and our investors. I truly know that they are bearing the brunt [of the collapse]. " - Jon Corzine, head of MF Global Holdings Ltd., telling lawmakers in Washington he does not know what happened to a missing $1.2 billion. "Germany is the unquestioned leader of Europe. France is definitely subordinate to Germany, and Britain has less influence than at any time I can recall.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
Specialty pharmaceutical company Yaupon Therapeutics Inc., of Malvern, said it raised $14.4 million in a private placement of preferred stock. Yaupon is privately held. Investors in the new round include prior investors Vivo Ventures, Palo Alto Investors and Burrill & Co., plus a new investor, Aperture Venture Partners, Yaupon said. The company is developing a topical treatment for early stage mycosis fungoid's, the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.    - Reid Kanaley
NEWS
April 15, 2011
ALTOONA, Pa. - On April 27 there will still be a city with roughly 31,000 residents in the Allegheny Mountains about 85 miles east of Pittsburgh. What there won't be is a city named Altoona. That's because the city has sold its name for two months to make some money - and to help independent filmmaker Morgan Spurlock make a point. The Altoona Mirror reports that the city council on Wednesday approved a deal to change the city's name to "POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.
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