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Plagiarism

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NEWS
July 17, 2003 | By David Zhou
Plagiarism proved to be the undoing of Blair Hornstine, the Moorestown High School graduate who sued her school district rather share the title of valedictorian. The majority of media attention had focused on her unusual lawsuit, but Harvard University found Hornstine's lack of citation in guest columns for her local newspaper to be far more disquieting. According to the Harvard Crimson, the plagiarism spurred the university's decision to rescind Hornstine's admission to the class of 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2002 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the flu, plagiarism seems to be catching. Now it has come to light that historian Doris Kearns Goodwin reached a settlement several years ago with Lynne McTaggart, who complained she wasn't properly credited for passages in Goodwin's 1987 book, The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys. Goodwin said this week that her use of McTaggart's words from the 1983 Kathleen Kennedy: Her Life and Times, verbatim and without proper credit, was "absolutely not" plagiarism, though her deed seems to fit the definition, last we checked.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | BY DONALD KAUL
As you probably haven't noticed, I've been away on vacation recently (Don't feel bad; I didn't notice your vacation, either). The thing about being a columnist, however, is that things keep happening while you're on vacation and you don't have a chance to comment on them. For example, while I was gone, a very pregnant Demi Moore appeared very nude on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine, creating a stir. I myself was shocked and appalled. I'd never seen anyone named Demi before. Can you imagine the teasing she took in school from the kids with normal names, the Lisas, Kims and Ludmillas?
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Tom Wolf's campaign for governor has apologized and fired a consultant after acknowledging the aide lifted passages from a Wisconsin energy company's reports and reprinted them as part of Wolf's policy on energy efficiency. "I have directed the staff to make sure nothing like this ever happens again, and have asked for a new process to be put in place to ensure it does not," Wolf said in a statement. U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, one of his opponents in the Democratic primary, pointed out the "troubling plagiarism" Thursday, saying the episode raised doubts about the front-runner.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The similarity in essay after essay was striking to Carrie Marcinkevage, then admissions director of the master of business administration program at Pennsylvania State University's Smeal College of Business. Through their own investigation that year, she and her colleagues found that 29 MBA applicants had plagiarized their essays - from the same two sources. That was 2009. "We realized how ridiculously error-ridden and inefficient that was," said Marcinkevage, now MBA managing director at Smeal.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | By Ken Fireman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
His tongue planted firmly in his cheek, the Rev. Jesse Jackson gave three other Democratic presidential hopefuls a lesson yesterday in how to avoid charges of plagiarism, which helped end the campaign of Delaware Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. Jackson, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis and Reps. Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri and Patricia Schroeder of Colorado were speaking at a forum sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus. Things began when Gephardt, answering a question about education, closed with a line that Dukakis used recently in Iowa: "Instead of Star Wars, we need star schools.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr., battling to defend his honor and his presidential hopes, admitted yesterday that he made a "dumb" mistake by committing plagiarism in a law school paper 22 years ago. The 44-year-old Delaware Democrat vowed to carry on his campaign for the presidential nomination despite the storm of bad publicity. Political experts said, however, that he had been badly hurt and might be unable to survive votes in Iowa and New Hampshire next winter. "I want to tell them all: I'm in this race to stay, I'm in this race to win, and here I come," Biden declared firmly at an early morning news conference before returning to the Senate Judiciary Committee, where he was presiding over hearings on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Robert H. Bork.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | BY MARY MCGRORY
Will somebody please interview Neil Kinnock? The British Labor Party leader could be about to enter the pantheon of U.S. political history - not on a level with Donna Rice, of course, but as an unwitting agent of what could easily become the season's second Democratic presidential exit. He has become a household word in America, not the usual fate of a Welsh politician so recently and so soundly defeated. Is he comforted, is he flattered? Does he mind that Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Larry Eichel, Doreen Carvajal and Mike Sante, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr., his presidential campaign already shaken by reports that he has borrowed parts of other politicians' speeches, will hold a news conference today, reportedly to discuss an accusation of plagiarism leveled against him in law school. A source close to the senator confirmed last night that Biden was accused of plagiarizing while attending Syracuse University Law School. The Delaware Democrat - the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is holding hearings on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Robert H. Bork - attended Syracuse between 1965 and 1968.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Democratic presidential candidate Joseph Biden today rejected charges of ethical misconduct in law school and in his presidential campaign and ringingly declared himself in the race to stay. "I'm in this race to stay, I'm in this race to win, here I come!" Biden said at a hastily called news conference to answer published reports that he was guilty of plagiarism in law school and had deliberately misled voters by quoting other political leaders without attribution in campaign speeches.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Tom Wolf's campaign for governor has apologized and fired a consultant after acknowledging the aide lifted passages from a Wisconsin energy company's reports and reprinted them as part of Wolf's policy on energy efficiency. "I have directed the staff to make sure nothing like this ever happens again, and have asked for a new process to be put in place to ensure it does not," Wolf said in a statement. U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, one of his opponents in the Democratic primary, pointed out the "troubling plagiarism" Thursday, saying the episode raised doubts about the front-runner.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The similarity in essay after essay was striking to Carrie Marcinkevage, then admissions director of the master of business administration program at Pennsylvania State University's Smeal College of Business. Through their own investigation that year, she and her colleagues found that 29 MBA applicants had plagiarized their essays - from the same two sources. That was 2009. "We realized how ridiculously error-ridden and inefficient that was," said Marcinkevage, now MBA managing director at Smeal.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
BRADLEY COOPER is Hollywood's go-to guy when it comes to playing struggling writers who find overnight success via shady means. In "Limitless," a designer brain-power drug put him on the best-seller list. In "The Words," it's old-fashioned plagiarism. Cooper plays Rory Jensen, a modestly talented fiction writer whose exasperatingly long bohemian phase starts to test the patience of his wife (Zoe Saldana) and father (J.K. Simmons). Cooper is a decent writer, a few agents compliment his unpublished work, but he can't break through - until, that is, he finds an old, yellowed manuscript in a vintage briefcase purchased at a Paris antique shop.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
An internal investigation by the University of Pennsylvania found no evidence of research misconduct or plagiarism by two psychiatry professors - one of whom is the chair of the department - who were accused by a colleague of putting their names on a ghostwritten paper in 2001. The report said that though current standards would have required Dwight Evans, chair of Penn's psychiatry department, and Laszlo Gyulai, now an emeritus associate professor of psychiatry, to acknowledge that they had received "assistance from a medical writer," guidelines in effect in 2001 did not. Last summer, Jay D. Amsterdam, a Penn professor who also had been involved in the study of the effect of the antidepressant Paxil on depression in patients with bipolar disorder, filed a complaint with the federal Office of Research Integrity about the study.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By David Templeton, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  An assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Nursing has lost his job due to research misconduct that includes plagiarizing text and falsifying data in two unpublished manuscripts and two applications for federal grants, according to investigators for the school and a federal agency. Scott Weber's dismissal was based on information released by a university research integrity officer and the Office of Research Integrity, a federal agency that investigates allegations of misconduct in research for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most writers would sell their souls to have their work spotlighted by Oprah Winfrey. After all, Winfrey's endorsement can make stars out of unknowns. When featured on her syndicated talk show, books routinely rocket to the top of the best-seller lists. So it comes as a bit of surprise to learn that one Philadelphia scribe is suing Winfrey, claiming that she read selections from a booklet he penned a decade ago. Charles Harris, in a suit filed this week in U.S. District Court, says Winfrey recited selections from his work last year without permission.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Iron Man 2 At its best, the sequel to the 2008 hit is shaggily enjoyable and enjoyably shaggy with Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark, disarming arms industrialist, tossing off one-liners like comic grenades, eluding four villains (including Mickey Rourke) while sizing up Gwyneth Paltrow and Scarlett Johansson. PG-13 Exit Through the Gift Shop Banksy, the pseudonymous British artist, let a French videographer document his street stenciling, then turned the cameras on his chronicler when the Frenchman himself became an artist.
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | By William C. Kashatus
For the last five years, I've taught five sections of U.S. history at a rural Pennsylvania community college. That's about 150 students a semester. By midterm, one-third of those students have dropped the course. Another third withdraw before the semester ends rather than risking an "F. " Some students complain that my standards are too high. Others grumble that history is "boring. " In fact, my courses place the responsibility for learning on the student; I'm simply the facilitator.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
A PUBLICITY EVENT at the Colorado Mills Mall has turned into one of the most expensive mall trips ever for Vincent "Don Vito" Margera. The "Viva La Bam" star (and Bam Margera's uncle), who was born in Glen Mills and still lives in the area, was convicted yesterday on two counts of sexual assault and acquitted on a third, over a groping incident involving a 14-year-old girl and two 12-year-old girls at an August 2006 autograph session in Lakewood, Colo. The Rocky Mountain News reported on its Web site yesterday that upon hearing the verdict, Margera, 51, keeled over in court and yelled, "Just kill me now!"
NEWS
August 2, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Facing his first serious challenge in 20 years, U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) accused his opponent yesterday of being a liar and plagiarist for borrowing ideas, and some phrasing, from a public-policy think tank. The think tank, a research center for the centrist Democratic Leadership Council, said it didn't mind, and offered to let Weldon use its material, too. In a press release, the Weldon campaign said retired Rear Adm. Joe Sestak cribbed his health-care policy from the Progressive Policy Institute, "with much of the language ripped verbatim" from the think tank's papers.
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