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NEWS
July 21, 2003
EARNI YOUNG'S article, "City Mortgage Foreclosures on the Rise" (July 16) is right on time. ACORN has been touting this message for four years, first documenting it in a Philadelphia foreclosure study in 2000. The fact is, foreclosures are on the rise around the state, and are directly linked to the explosion of sub-prime lending. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association's own reports, the state has the fourth-highest rate of sub-prime foreclosures in the country with over 12 percent of all sub-prime loans in foreclosure, and another 6 percent that are 90 days or more late.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A Distant Mirror is set in 1349, and, like the Barbara Tuchman history of the same name, the premise of the play at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts is that certain aspects of life and society in the 14th century reflect our own. Except for one very obvious instance, Robert Smythe's play fails to make substantial, valid comparisons between the two eras. As social commentary, A Distant Mirror has little impact. Neither does it have much punch as a piece of theater. The production combines human actors and puppets - Smythe is the artistic director of the Mum Puppettheatre - and, under the direction of Ken Marini, neither the human nor the inanimate performers succeed very well in making credible the play's characters and situations.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Garnet Valley coach Jerry Doemling realizes his Jaguars had better get their act together. After a hard-fought 50-47 loss to Bishop Shanahan in a Southern Chester County League game Tuesday night, the Jaguars fell to 1-2 in the conference and 4-8 overall. Doemling said the loss was the result of his players making the same mistakes that have been costing them all season. "We seem to be somewhat consistent about the mistakes we have been making," Doemling said. The Jaguars stayed closely behind the Eagles (6-6, 3-1)
NEWS
February 13, 2007
J.F. WOLFINGTON (letters, Feb. 6) proposes questions on gun control that he feels will be difficult to answer, but are in fact easy. The reason that the dumb, ineffective gun laws have more violent effect in modern times is due to several factors. The most obvious is gun technology, including the invention of Teflon-coated, hollow-point, "cop-killer" bullets, the wide availability of automatic assault weapons capable of spraying an area with deadly projectiles and cheap concealable plastic weapons not easily detected by scanning equipment.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Dave Barry
I'm wondering if any of you readers out there have noticed any suspicious behavior on the part of frogs. I ask because the ones at my house are definitely up to something. I live in South Florida, which has a hot, moist, armpit-like climate that is very favorable for life in general. So I am used to wildlife. I am used to the fact that, as I walk from my car to the front door - striding briskly to prevent fungus from growing on my body - I will routinely pass lizards, snakes, spiders, snails and mutant prehistoric grasshoppers large enough for the Lone Ranger to saddle up and ride into the sunset on ("Hi-ho, Silver, AWAYYYEEEEEIIIKES!"
NEWS
June 5, 1996
Philadelphia's School Superintendent David Hornbeck is beset with a plague of elected officials who aren't doing their jobs, but want to do his. Let's start with the state, then get to the judge. As a matter of law, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania makes children attend school until age 16. As a matter of morality at least, it's the job of the governor and the Legislature to make sure every child enjoys an equal opportunity for education. That includes evening out geographical inequities in funding.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Danica Kirka, Associated Press
LONDON - Workers digging a new railway line have uncovered what they believe is a burial ground containing victims of the Black Death - a plague that wiped out as much as half of London's inhabitants when it swept the city in the mid-14th century. Workers involved in the Crossrail project located 13 skeletons lying in two carefully laid-out rows on the edge of historic Charterhouse Square, an area where historical records suggest a burial ground was located. Project archaeologist Jay Carver said scientists will study the bones to establish cause of death, and hope to map the DNA signature of the plague bacteria.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Philadelphia Electric Co. has asked borough police to assist them in investigating at least five thefts of copper wire that have occurred over the last few months at PE's service building on West Ashland Street. PE spokeswoman Susan Buehler said last week that an estimated $5,000 in copper wire and tools have been stolen from the service facility. "We think they're selling the wire as scrap or to dealers for money for drugs. They're probably getting about 90 cents a pound," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Their trusty steeds thundering across brilliant Provencal landscapes, Angelo and Pauline are strangers thrown together by fate, zigzagging the countryside and fleeing villages of people mad with fear - or mad with delirium caused by a fatal plague. So goes The Horseman on the Roof, two hours of breathtaking widescreen scenery, breathless actors in poufy 19th-century threads, and squawking crows descending from the skies to feast on corpses. Many, many corpses. A handsome but increasingly wearisome historical romance from Jean-Paul Rappeneau (the director of Cyrano de Bergerac)
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | By Doug Hadden, Special to The Inquirer
"Stage fright" might be the best way to describe the troubles that plagued the Northeast High basketball team during the first week of the season. For the second time in three games, the Vikings had extreme difficulty finding the basket during the early part of the game and, despite a late rally, fell to a 56-45 loss at Edward Bok Tech on Thursday in a Public League preseason contest. "We couldn't buy a basket," said Northeast's first-year coach, Bob Michael. "We had the shots, but we were real cold.
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SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - Tommy Joseph had been hit in the forehead with foul tips. The catcher had been hit on the top of the head. Monday night, Joseph was hit in the jaw. He said it caught him in a different way than any ball ever has. "It caught me in a different spot and jarred me a little different," Joseph said. "After that, I just wasn't feeling right. " Joseph, 23, remained in triple-A Lehigh Valley's game for another inning before talking to the team's trainer. Joseph said he was out of the game 30 seconds later.
SPORTS
May 8, 2015
ATLANTA - Nine series into the Phillies season, their pitching staff still leads the major leagues in walks. Their bullpen entered Wednesday's series finale against the Atlanta Braves with 54 free passes, 11 more than any other team. Dustin McGowan has been the biggest culprit. Four walks in one-third of an inning Tuesday gave the 33-year-old righthander a whopping 16 for the season (over 14 innings), the most free passes among major-league relievers. "Walking batters is killing me," he said Wednesday.
SPORTS
February 28, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even Brett Brown had to laugh. After practice Thursday, the 76ers coach was trying to explain the difficulties that newly acquired point guard Isaiah Canaan is going to have running the offense. Brown related how, the night before, Canaan managed to call two plays when just one was required. "It means three guys are going to crash into each other if they actually executed what the visual was," an amused Brown said. "You could see that he's trying to call the right thing and he's trying to please us, but it was just wrong.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decision to suspend Nightly News anchor Brian Williams for six months without pay is the latest unwelcome development at an NBCUniversal News Group division that has become a nagging and highly public trouble spot for Comcast Corp. The problems at NBC News, which date to Ann Curry's tearful on-air goodbye as Today co-host in June 2012, have stretched over two news-division leadership regimes. Williams' suspension now threatens months of speculation on his ultimate fate at the ratings leader Nightly News . "It's a noisy problem, and it plays out in the public," said Frank Sesno, director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Since New Jersey expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, its efforts to enroll thousands of low-income residents have been hampered by low staffing and antiquated technology. Gov. Christie championed the expansion, and, indeed, 300,000 New Jersey adults have enrolled in Medicaid, the federal program for the poor and disabled, since President Obama's health-care law took effect in October 2013. Many gained coverage directly through online state and federal portals. Yet an estimated 11,000 others, whom experts describe as some of the state's most vulnerable citizens, have received no response to their applications.
SPORTS
December 29, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
SALT LAKE CITY - The 76ers are on another losing streak. They owe this one to their continued case of the poor-shooting and costly turnover blues. In the end, the Utah Jazz prevailed, 88-71, on Saturday night at EnergySolutions Arena. The Sixers (4-25) have opened the West Coast portion of their seven-game road trip with back-to-back losses to the Portland Trail Blazers and the Jazz (10-20). Unlike Friday's 114-93 blowout by the Blazers, the Sixers still had a chance despite their shortcomings against Utah.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The ringside doctor had already examined Gabriel Rosado's left eye three times. The fourth inspection proved to be the last. Rosado's vision was too obstructed for the North Philadelphia fighter to continue. Saturday night's 12-round bout against David Lemieux at Brooklyn's Barclays Center was halted in the middle of the 10th round. Lemieux (33-2, 31 KOs) was awarded a technical knockout. The Canadian waived a Quebec flag and celebrated the retaining of his NABF middleweight title.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Riding the escalator in Philadelphia's new Family Court after last week's ribbon-cutting ceremony, I overheard a woman remark that the building didn't turn out as bad as she expected, given the grubby scandal that accompanied its creation. I concur. Sure, Philadelphia's first new courthouse in a generation is a dispiriting example of bland, office-park architecture plunked in the civic heart of the city. The exterior has all the charm of a cardboard box - and the proportions to match.
SPORTS
October 14, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he discussed his team's performance after Saturday night's 18-13 loss to Michigan, Penn State coach James Franklin prompted some head scratching when he said, "The bye week is coming at a good time. " Even though the Nittany Lions (4-2, 1-2 Big Ten) just had been through a bye week, few - if any - signs of improvement were evident in front of more than 113,000 fans at the Big House. Franklin pointed out the same problems, just as he had previously in this deteriorating 2014 season.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the poor, food is not only scarce, it's often rotten and germ-ridden. Corner stores and small supermarkets that feed vast swaths of impoverished Philadelphia offer bacteria-laced foods in unhealthy conditions that can lead to foodborne illness, a Drexel University study shows. Customers vouch for the science. "Potatoes and baby food are moldy, lettuce is rotten, and the mice are having a good time in boxes of noodles," said Rodney Jenkins, 47, an unemployed North Philadelphia man. "I ate bad fruit from a corner store and got sick.
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