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NEWS
July 21, 2003
EARNI YOUNG'S article, "City Mortgage Foreclosures on the Rise" (July 16) is right on time. ACORN has been touting this message for four years, first documenting it in a Philadelphia foreclosure study in 2000. The fact is, foreclosures are on the rise around the state, and are directly linked to the explosion of sub-prime lending. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association's own reports, the state has the fourth-highest rate of sub-prime foreclosures in the country with over 12 percent of all sub-prime loans in foreclosure, and another 6 percent that are 90 days or more late.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A Distant Mirror is set in 1349, and, like the Barbara Tuchman history of the same name, the premise of the play at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts is that certain aspects of life and society in the 14th century reflect our own. Except for one very obvious instance, Robert Smythe's play fails to make substantial, valid comparisons between the two eras. As social commentary, A Distant Mirror has little impact. Neither does it have much punch as a piece of theater. The production combines human actors and puppets - Smythe is the artistic director of the Mum Puppettheatre - and, under the direction of Ken Marini, neither the human nor the inanimate performers succeed very well in making credible the play's characters and situations.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Garnet Valley coach Jerry Doemling realizes his Jaguars had better get their act together. After a hard-fought 50-47 loss to Bishop Shanahan in a Southern Chester County League game Tuesday night, the Jaguars fell to 1-2 in the conference and 4-8 overall. Doemling said the loss was the result of his players making the same mistakes that have been costing them all season. "We seem to be somewhat consistent about the mistakes we have been making," Doemling said. The Jaguars stayed closely behind the Eagles (6-6, 3-1)
NEWS
February 13, 2007
J.F. WOLFINGTON (letters, Feb. 6) proposes questions on gun control that he feels will be difficult to answer, but are in fact easy. The reason that the dumb, ineffective gun laws have more violent effect in modern times is due to several factors. The most obvious is gun technology, including the invention of Teflon-coated, hollow-point, "cop-killer" bullets, the wide availability of automatic assault weapons capable of spraying an area with deadly projectiles and cheap concealable plastic weapons not easily detected by scanning equipment.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Dave Barry
I'm wondering if any of you readers out there have noticed any suspicious behavior on the part of frogs. I ask because the ones at my house are definitely up to something. I live in South Florida, which has a hot, moist, armpit-like climate that is very favorable for life in general. So I am used to wildlife. I am used to the fact that, as I walk from my car to the front door - striding briskly to prevent fungus from growing on my body - I will routinely pass lizards, snakes, spiders, snails and mutant prehistoric grasshoppers large enough for the Lone Ranger to saddle up and ride into the sunset on ("Hi-ho, Silver, AWAYYYEEEEEIIIKES!"
NEWS
June 5, 1996
Philadelphia's School Superintendent David Hornbeck is beset with a plague of elected officials who aren't doing their jobs, but want to do his. Let's start with the state, then get to the judge. As a matter of law, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania makes children attend school until age 16. As a matter of morality at least, it's the job of the governor and the Legislature to make sure every child enjoys an equal opportunity for education. That includes evening out geographical inequities in funding.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Danica Kirka, Associated Press
LONDON - Workers digging a new railway line have uncovered what they believe is a burial ground containing victims of the Black Death - a plague that wiped out as much as half of London's inhabitants when it swept the city in the mid-14th century. Workers involved in the Crossrail project located 13 skeletons lying in two carefully laid-out rows on the edge of historic Charterhouse Square, an area where historical records suggest a burial ground was located. Project archaeologist Jay Carver said scientists will study the bones to establish cause of death, and hope to map the DNA signature of the plague bacteria.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Philadelphia Electric Co. has asked borough police to assist them in investigating at least five thefts of copper wire that have occurred over the last few months at PE's service building on West Ashland Street. PE spokeswoman Susan Buehler said last week that an estimated $5,000 in copper wire and tools have been stolen from the service facility. "We think they're selling the wire as scrap or to dealers for money for drugs. They're probably getting about 90 cents a pound," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Their trusty steeds thundering across brilliant Provencal landscapes, Angelo and Pauline are strangers thrown together by fate, zigzagging the countryside and fleeing villages of people mad with fear - or mad with delirium caused by a fatal plague. So goes The Horseman on the Roof, two hours of breathtaking widescreen scenery, breathless actors in poufy 19th-century threads, and squawking crows descending from the skies to feast on corpses. Many, many corpses. A handsome but increasingly wearisome historical romance from Jean-Paul Rappeneau (the director of Cyrano de Bergerac)
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | By Doug Hadden, Special to The Inquirer
"Stage fright" might be the best way to describe the troubles that plagued the Northeast High basketball team during the first week of the season. For the second time in three games, the Vikings had extreme difficulty finding the basket during the early part of the game and, despite a late rally, fell to a 56-45 loss at Edward Bok Tech on Thursday in a Public League preseason contest. "We couldn't buy a basket," said Northeast's first-year coach, Bob Michael. "We had the shots, but we were real cold.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 2016
By Dan White Less than two weeks to go in the fiscal year, and Pennsylvania is still without a new budget. This is usually the time to start complaining about partisan gridlock and assign blame. That's easy to do from afar, but it is much more difficult to sit in Harrisburg and reconcile competing interests. So let's first take stock of how things stand elsewhere in the country. All but four states begin their new fiscal years in July, and of those, 10 still do not have a budget in place.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
'Ready to rock?" Those words may not be that unusual at Choral Arts Philadelphia's regular J.S. Bach rehearsals, but this week, their meaning is literal. Artistic director Matthew Glandorf, who has been using the above words, is veering far from the basic choral repertoire with The Plague , an oratorio that singer/songwriter Andrew Lipke refashioned from his 2011 pop album of the same name. The chorus and Lipke's own stratospheric vocals will share the musical foreground at the Bach@7 series Wednesday at St. Clement's Church.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
By lunchtime Thursday, Ursinus College freshman Sam Hayslett was happy to be healthy. She took a Spanish test in the morning, and had no complaints about having to bundle up and trudge off to the athletic center for a hoagie. But Hayslett acknowledged her luck may not last. Her roommate had started vomiting overnight - the first sign of what everyone was calling the Ursinus plague. In barely 48 hours, a stomach virus had washed over the Collegeville campus, disrupting life at the liberal arts school unlike anything in recent memory.
SPORTS
January 6, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
If the Eagles were a house for sale, they'd be marketed as a fixer-upper that, according to the owner, is in need of some TLC. High on the list of repairs would be the offensive line, a section of the foundation that has rotted after being mostly ignored by its previous caretaker. Once a cohesive unit that fueled the best running game in football in 2013, the five men up front for the Eagles have become a mistake-prone, injury-hindered mess. Maybe a new way of doing things will help, because it sure appeared as if fired coach Chip Kelly's old way was not working.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2015
SEPTA continues to have problems with the introduction of its new Regional Rail schedules, with the agency contending with misprints and a smartphone app that is not showing users updated routes. SEPTA officials recommended that riders rely exclusively on the transit agency's website, SEPTA.org, for accurate schedules. "We're working as quickly as we can" to fix the app, said Richard Burnfield, SEPTA's deputy general manager. "We're literally going through thousands of data points.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, every truck in JCI Transportation's fleet has a flat-screen television and satellite radio. Company-supplied refrigerators in the cab are becoming the norm, and drivers, if they want, can plug in a microwave. "We try to give them all the comforts of home," said Larry Mertz, operations director at the Pennsauken trucking company. On any given day, Mertz, like nearly every trucking executive in the country, is desperately seeking more drivers - the industry needs 47,500 more of them.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hollywood continues to cannibalize its past with another pair of new dramas this week on Fox that should be awarded prizes for marginality. The slick sci-fi thriller Minority Report , premiering 9 p.m. Monday, is an unimaginative riff on Steven Spielberg's 2002 big-screen hit. While the network's Morris Chestnut vehicle Rosewood , set for 8 p.m. Wednesday, is a tiresome procedural about a crime-solving pathologist that rips off every cop and...
SPORTS
September 6, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
What was supposed to be the easy opening week of Rutgers football, a soft start for the Scarlet Knights Saturday against Norfolk State, has turned into maybe the darkest chapter yet for an athletic department that specializes in setting itself on fire. This seems to be the real cost of joining the Big Ten, of trying to be big time. The latest Rutgers headline: Five Rutgers players are arrested. The details are ugly. An allegedly unprovoked assault by four players. A fifth player and a former player charged in home invasions and armed robberies.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was hired as superintendent of Rose Tree Media School District in 2011, James Wigo was called the "best of the best" by the consultant who brought him to the school board's attention. Now, after several personnel moves have shaken the 3,800-student district - including the firing of a beloved elementary principal and the hiring of a middle school principal who subsequently was arrested and pleaded guilty to possessing child pornography - the 64-year-old superintendent is the one on slippery ground.
SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - Jesse Biddle waited more than five years to reach triple A. It was unprecedented for a Phillies first-round pick. The wait finally ended Wednesday night, but Biddle's debut was unsatisfying. Biddle allowed seven runs on five hits in just 21/3 innings against the Pawtucket Red Sox. The lefthander walked six batters, including four in the third inning. He struck out one batter and threw 74 pitches, 33 of which were for strikes. Biddle was removed from the game with the bases loaded and one out in the third inning.
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