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NEWS
November 15, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ruled that Ramona Africa and the other plaintiffs in the MOVE civil trial cannot collect interest on top of their jury awards to compensate them for their decade-long wait for the case to reach trial. U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak said Ramona Africa and relatives of MOVE founder John Africa were not entitled to interest under federal law because the jury had awarded them damages for noneconomic harm, such as pain and suffering. He rejected a request for interest from another plaintiff - Louise James, mother of Frank James Africa - on the ground that she did not file her motion on time.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Several black men who were contracted to work at the Sunoco refinery in Philadelphia were forced to clean up racial slurs written about them on bathroom walls, the men claim in a federal civil rights lawsuit. Along with racial epithets, the men also claim in the suit filed Wednesday that there were nooses left around the workplace on several occasions. The six plaintiffs, led by Kenneth Hall, 40, of Philadelphia, were all employees of Advanced Speciality Contractors, of Aston, which was contracted to work on a project at the Sunoco refinery on Passyunk Avenue near 61st Street in Southwest Philadelphia, the suit said.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two weeks after Cherry Hill Mayor Susan Bass Levin publicly disclosed a $17 million settlement offer by lawyer Peter J. O'Connor to end a lawsuit over affordable housing, O'Connor and his clients have denounced Levin's account as "a vicious falsehood. " In a written statement, O'Connor said the mayor's description of the settlement offer was "completely inaccurate and misrepresented the position of the plaintiffs. " In an interview yesterday, Levin said she stood by her account and provided notes of the meeting with O'Connor in support of her recollection.
NEWS
January 9, 2006
AS ONE OF THE plaintiffs in the recent successful verdict against the School District of Philadelphia, I take issue with some of the points that Rotan Lee made in his Dec. 28 op-ed, "In Defense of Carl and the Cracker Slur. " I have no problem with Mr. Lee's defense of Carl Singley's outburst as "venting. " What I do resent is his contention that there was "backslapping jocularity between the plaintiffs and the jurors. " First of all, Mr. Lee wasn't there in the courthouse and wouldn't know firsthand what transpired.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For the second time, a federal judge in Philadelphia has dismissed health- damage claims filed by 18 families and individuals who live or lived near the PCB-contaminated Paoli railroad maintenance yard in Chester County. The plaintiffs, 32 people seeking millions of dollars in damages, contend they or their late relatives developed illnesses from exposure to toxic polychlorinated biphenyls, known as PCBs, used for decades in railcar transformers. In a series of opinions released yesterday, U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly concluded that the families had no "prima facie" case, and entered summary judgment in favor of all defendants.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all the polished rhetoric and decorous argumentation by very pricey lawyers, there was no disguising the bare-knuckle nature of the hearing Dec. 17 before U.S. District Judge Jan DuBois in Philadelphia. On its face, the issue was whether Philadelphia lawyer Joseph Kohn would disclose his most private communications in a lawsuit, filed in Ecuador, against energy giant Chevron. The suit alleges that Chevron bears responsibility for pollution in a wide swath of Amazon rain forest in eastern Ecuador, where Texaco, which merged with Chevron in 2001, had oil-drilling operations.
NEWS
May 22, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five African American men who sued Whitemarsh Township and a decorated police sergeant for alleged racial profiling and alleged civil-rights violations will each receive $30,000 as part of a settlement while the two law firms that represented them will get $100,000 each. The case stemmed from allegations brought by fellow officers against former Sgt. Guy Anhorn. In reports to township officials and in depositions in the lawsuit, officers accused Anhorn of targeting blacks, performing illegal searches, and falsifying arrest affidavits.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at Merck & Co. Inc. called them "records retention guidelines" - routine reminders urging employees to manage and reduce the almost unfathomable amount of paperwork generated by the pharmaceutical giant. African American employees, who have filed class-action discrimination lawsuits against Merck in federal courts in Philadelphia and Albany, Ga., saw the July memo as something more sinister: a thinly veiled nudge to bosses to shred records that could hurt Merck in court.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Assemblywoman Maureen Ogden came to the state legislature in 1982 already experienced in an aspect of government that most politicians would just as soon avoid: lawsuits. During the three years that she served as mayor of Millburn, Ogden was sued three times by the township's former attorney. Ogden says those cases were without legal merit, and she points out that the judge who heard the cases dismissed the first two in summary judgments - without hearing arguments - and that he dismissed the third lawsuit after hearing the plaintiff's arguments.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty-one former students at Neumann College in Aston have filed suit against the school, alleging that it did not clearly tell them that its new three-year master's program in physical therapy lacked accreditation when they enrolled in the fall of 1994. As a result, it took the plaintiffs an additional fourth year to get their degrees, according to Media attorney Jon J. Auritt, who filed the suit Tuesday in Delaware County Court. "We have not seen the [lawsuit]. We can't possibly comment," said Stephen Bell, a Neumann College spokesman, yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - The New Jersey Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a second legal challenge to Gov. Christie's 2011 pension overhaul, ruling that the state did not violate a contractual right when it froze cost-of-living increases for retired public employees. The 6-1 decision is a big fiscal win for the state, which had warned that an adverse ruling would have a "devastating impact" on the pension system for public employees. Suspending cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) at 2011 levels reduced the pension system's unfunded liability by $17.5 billion, the state says.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A federal judge this week dismissed a defamation lawsuit against former Mayor Michael Nutter and two top city law enforcement officials filed by narcotics officers who were acquitted in a high-profile corruption case. U.S. District Judge Paul S. Diamond on Monday ruled in favor of Nutter, District Attorney Seth Williams, and former Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, writing in a 16-page memorandum that the officers' complaint "reads more like a news release than a pleading. " Six of the plaintiffs - Thomas Liciardello, Brian Reynolds, Michael Spicer, Perry Betts, John Speiser, and Linwood Norman - were accused of a conspiracy to rob and extort money from drug dealers.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Two environmental groups announced Monday that they are suing the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Transportation to try to block creation of a 26-acre dredge disposal site on Barnegat Bay. Environment New Jersey, the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, and a coalition of homeowners near the proposed site said they are challenging the DEP for allowing the transportation agency to develop the property without proper...
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
More than four years after Philadelphia police arrested dozens of Occupy Philadelphia protesters, the city has agreed to pay $200,000 to settle claims that officers violated demonstrators' civil rights. The settlement was reached last week. Attorneys are waiting for all 25 plaintiffs to sign off on the deal before it is final. "We feel very strongly that the First Amendment rights of Occupy protesters on the night of the eviction have been vindicated through this settlement," said Paul Hetznecker, one of the attorneys for the protesters.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Leona Wright, then a feisty 94-year-old Bible school teacher, was beaming. It was November 2013 and Wright and her longtime neighbors had just learned that they would not have to move out of the Mount Holly Gardens, after all. "Yes, yes, I'm getting a new house" in the Gardens, she said that chilly night when the residents packed a Mount Holly Township meeting to hear about a potential settlement. It was just days before the case was to go before the U.S. Supreme Court and the settlement would allow the Burlington County town to demolish the complex of aging rowhouses but give Wright and 19 other families new condominiums in the planned development of several hundred units in the Gardens neighborhood.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Thousands of women around the country who claim harm from Essure sterilization coils hope a federal judge in Philadelphia will allow five lawsuits to proceed against manufacturer Bayer Healthcare despite the device's protected status. But at a hearing on Monday, U.S. District Judge John R. Padova sounded unimpressed with some of the legal arguments submitted by lawyers for the five women. Padova directed lead attorney Marcus Susen of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to resubmit part of the case with more specifics by Friday.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer representing plaintiffs in federal litigation over the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment asserted in a filing Thursday that Conrail misled the court about its training program, leading to an adverse ruling against those suing over the accident and chemical spill. The filing in U.S. District Court in Camden claims an affidavit by a Conrail risk officer provided false testimony, and that the company's training program for conductors - approved by the Federal Railroad Administration months before the Nov. 30, 2012, derailment - was withheld in court.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Tuesday revived a lawsuit challenging the New York Police Department's post-9/11 surveillance of Muslim religious and civic groups, comparing the program to other dark moments of race-based government monitoring in America's past. "We have been down similar roads before," Circuit Judge Thomas Ambro wrote for a three-judge panel of the Philadelphia-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. "Jewish Americans during the Red Scare, African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, and Japanese Americans during World War II are examples that readily spring to mind.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia has given final approval to a $50 million settlement to an antitrust class action that pitted Comcast Corp. against plaintiffs' lawyers who were seeking $875 million. The pact will net customers a $15 credit on their bill or service upgrades worth $44, while plaintiffs' lawyers will get $15 million in fees and expenses. About 800,000 Philadelphia-area Comcast subscribers in Pennsylvania will benefit in late 2015 or early 2016 from the settlement. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania agreed to the final settlement, which gives Comcast the green light to shell out $33.3 million for the service enhancements and distribute a $16.7 million cash fund for attorneys' fees and payout costs to subscribers who requested them.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CHANGES COULD BE coming to the way Philadelphia seizes property under its civil-forfeiture program. The program - aimed at stopping drug activity - has caught innocent people in its net, violating their constitutional rights, critics say. Lawyers on both sides of a federal civil lawsuit yesterday told U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno that the parties are close to settling the first two of the plaintiffs' six claims in the lawsuit. A status report filed by lawyers for the city and the District Attorney's Office - the defendants in the lawsuit - also said three more claims could be settled.
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