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NEWS
November 15, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ruled that Ramona Africa and the other plaintiffs in the MOVE civil trial cannot collect interest on top of their jury awards to compensate them for their decade-long wait for the case to reach trial. U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak said Ramona Africa and relatives of MOVE founder John Africa were not entitled to interest under federal law because the jury had awarded them damages for noneconomic harm, such as pain and suffering. He rejected a request for interest from another plaintiff - Louise James, mother of Frank James Africa - on the ground that she did not file her motion on time.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Several black men who were contracted to work at the Sunoco refinery in Philadelphia were forced to clean up racial slurs written about them on bathroom walls, the men claim in a federal civil rights lawsuit. Along with racial epithets, the men also claim in the suit filed Wednesday that there were nooses left around the workplace on several occasions. The six plaintiffs, led by Kenneth Hall, 40, of Philadelphia, were all employees of Advanced Speciality Contractors, of Aston, which was contracted to work on a project at the Sunoco refinery on Passyunk Avenue near 61st Street in Southwest Philadelphia, the suit said.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two weeks after Cherry Hill Mayor Susan Bass Levin publicly disclosed a $17 million settlement offer by lawyer Peter J. O'Connor to end a lawsuit over affordable housing, O'Connor and his clients have denounced Levin's account as "a vicious falsehood. " In a written statement, O'Connor said the mayor's description of the settlement offer was "completely inaccurate and misrepresented the position of the plaintiffs. " In an interview yesterday, Levin said she stood by her account and provided notes of the meeting with O'Connor in support of her recollection.
NEWS
January 9, 2006
AS ONE OF THE plaintiffs in the recent successful verdict against the School District of Philadelphia, I take issue with some of the points that Rotan Lee made in his Dec. 28 op-ed, "In Defense of Carl and the Cracker Slur. " I have no problem with Mr. Lee's defense of Carl Singley's outburst as "venting. " What I do resent is his contention that there was "backslapping jocularity between the plaintiffs and the jurors. " First of all, Mr. Lee wasn't there in the courthouse and wouldn't know firsthand what transpired.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For the second time, a federal judge in Philadelphia has dismissed health- damage claims filed by 18 families and individuals who live or lived near the PCB-contaminated Paoli railroad maintenance yard in Chester County. The plaintiffs, 32 people seeking millions of dollars in damages, contend they or their late relatives developed illnesses from exposure to toxic polychlorinated biphenyls, known as PCBs, used for decades in railcar transformers. In a series of opinions released yesterday, U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly concluded that the families had no "prima facie" case, and entered summary judgment in favor of all defendants.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all the polished rhetoric and decorous argumentation by very pricey lawyers, there was no disguising the bare-knuckle nature of the hearing Dec. 17 before U.S. District Judge Jan DuBois in Philadelphia. On its face, the issue was whether Philadelphia lawyer Joseph Kohn would disclose his most private communications in a lawsuit, filed in Ecuador, against energy giant Chevron. The suit alleges that Chevron bears responsibility for pollution in a wide swath of Amazon rain forest in eastern Ecuador, where Texaco, which merged with Chevron in 2001, had oil-drilling operations.
NEWS
May 22, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five African American men who sued Whitemarsh Township and a decorated police sergeant for alleged racial profiling and alleged civil-rights violations will each receive $30,000 as part of a settlement while the two law firms that represented them will get $100,000 each. The case stemmed from allegations brought by fellow officers against former Sgt. Guy Anhorn. In reports to township officials and in depositions in the lawsuit, officers accused Anhorn of targeting blacks, performing illegal searches, and falsifying arrest affidavits.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at Merck & Co. Inc. called them "records retention guidelines" - routine reminders urging employees to manage and reduce the almost unfathomable amount of paperwork generated by the pharmaceutical giant. African American employees, who have filed class-action discrimination lawsuits against Merck in federal courts in Philadelphia and Albany, Ga., saw the July memo as something more sinister: a thinly veiled nudge to bosses to shred records that could hurt Merck in court.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Assemblywoman Maureen Ogden came to the state legislature in 1982 already experienced in an aspect of government that most politicians would just as soon avoid: lawsuits. During the three years that she served as mayor of Millburn, Ogden was sued three times by the township's former attorney. Ogden says those cases were without legal merit, and she points out that the judge who heard the cases dismissed the first two in summary judgments - without hearing arguments - and that he dismissed the third lawsuit after hearing the plaintiff's arguments.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty-one former students at Neumann College in Aston have filed suit against the school, alleging that it did not clearly tell them that its new three-year master's program in physical therapy lacked accreditation when they enrolled in the fall of 1994. As a result, it took the plaintiffs an additional fourth year to get their degrees, according to Media attorney Jon J. Auritt, who filed the suit Tuesday in Delaware County Court. "We have not seen the [lawsuit]. We can't possibly comment," said Stephen Bell, a Neumann College spokesman, yesterday.
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NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CHANGES COULD BE coming to the way Philadelphia seizes property under its civil-forfeiture program. The program - aimed at stopping drug activity - has caught innocent people in its net, violating their constitutional rights, critics say. Lawyers on both sides of a federal civil lawsuit yesterday told U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno that the parties are close to settling the first two of the plaintiffs' six claims in the lawsuit. A status report filed by lawyers for the city and the District Attorney's Office - the defendants in the lawsuit - also said three more claims could be settled.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's officially safe to carry signs to School Reform Commission meetings. Three former Philadelphia teachers have settled a civil-rights lawsuit they filed against the SRC, Commissioner Bill Green, the city, and others, splitting $32,500 in what they say were First Amendment violations. At a crowded and contentious February SRC meeting, officials confiscated placards from Lisa Haver, Ilene Poses, and Barbara Dowdall. City police also removed Poses from Philadelphia School District headquarters after she refused to surrender the sign she wore around her neck.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
A lawsuit contending that Pennsylvania's system of school funding is broken will move to the state's top court, attorneys vowed Tuesday after a lower court dismissed the case brought by school districts, parents, and advocates. Lawyers said they would appeal to the state Supreme Court after the Commonwealth Court ruled that education funding was a legislative issue and not a legal matter. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," said Jennifer Clarke, executive director of the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, part of the team that represents petitioners in this case.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THREE RETIRED Philadelphia School District teachers have filed a federal lawsuit against the School Reform Commission, former chairman Bill Green, the city and other parties for allegedly violating their constitutional rights during an SRC meeting. The trio - Ilene Poses, Lisa Haver and Barbara Dowdall - say the violations occurred during a Feb. 18 meeting at which commissioners voted on charter-school applications, according to the suit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
LAWYERS representing six Pennsylvania school districts, parents and education advocates argued yesterday that state courts must hold the Legislature accountable for providing adequate funding for public education. The arguments before a panel of Commonwealth Court judges in Harrisburg were to determine whether the lawsuit should move forward. The plaintiffs, which also include seven parents from Philadelphia and the NAACP, claim the state has not provided sufficient funding for most students to pass mandatory graduation exams.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's system of education funding is broken, and the courts must force lawmakers to make it right, attorneys for school districts, parents, and organizations that have sued the commonwealth told a panel of judges here Wednesday. The suit - brought by school systems, including the William Penn district in Delaware County, and parents, including two from the Philadelphia School District - argues that Pennsylvania's education funding system is "irrational and inequitable.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Kessler, the former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner, testified Wednesday that as a pediatrician, it "certainly is a red flag to me" that a Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. study of the use of its antipsychotic drug Risperdal in young children and adolescents, mainly boys, showed high rates of breast growth. Kessler was FDA commissioner from 1990 to 1997, when Janssen, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, received approval in 1993 for the drug to be prescribed to adults with psychosis.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal judges in Philadelphia raised questions Tuesday about a New York Police Department surveillance program that critics say unfairly targeted Muslim communities after 9/11. The 11 plaintiffs in the case - including an Army sergeant, a former schoolteacher, and an imam - have argued that the surveillance intimidated people from attending Muslim businesses and places of worship. Julio Fuentes, one of three appeals court judges hearing the appeal, said he would not want to attend a mosque if it was being watched, and compared the effect to a business losing money.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of 45 Philadelphia taxi companies filed suit in federal court Tuesday alleging that Uber, the app-based taxi enterprise, is waging unfair competition against medallion owners who must operate under state laws and regulations. Lead litigant Checker Cab Philadelphia and the other cab operators accused Uber of racketeering. "Not since the days of bootlegging has there been a criminal enterprise so brazen and open as to attract hundreds of millions of dollars in investment from investment bankers and to operate in blatant violation of federal and state law as Uber," reads the complaint.
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