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NEWS
November 15, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ruled that Ramona Africa and the other plaintiffs in the MOVE civil trial cannot collect interest on top of their jury awards to compensate them for their decade-long wait for the case to reach trial. U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak said Ramona Africa and relatives of MOVE founder John Africa were not entitled to interest under federal law because the jury had awarded them damages for noneconomic harm, such as pain and suffering. He rejected a request for interest from another plaintiff - Louise James, mother of Frank James Africa - on the ground that she did not file her motion on time.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Several black men who were contracted to work at the Sunoco refinery in Philadelphia were forced to clean up racial slurs written about them on bathroom walls, the men claim in a federal civil rights lawsuit. Along with racial epithets, the men also claim in the suit filed Wednesday that there were nooses left around the workplace on several occasions. The six plaintiffs, led by Kenneth Hall, 40, of Philadelphia, were all employees of Advanced Speciality Contractors, of Aston, which was contracted to work on a project at the Sunoco refinery on Passyunk Avenue near 61st Street in Southwest Philadelphia, the suit said.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two weeks after Cherry Hill Mayor Susan Bass Levin publicly disclosed a $17 million settlement offer by lawyer Peter J. O'Connor to end a lawsuit over affordable housing, O'Connor and his clients have denounced Levin's account as "a vicious falsehood. " In a written statement, O'Connor said the mayor's description of the settlement offer was "completely inaccurate and misrepresented the position of the plaintiffs. " In an interview yesterday, Levin said she stood by her account and provided notes of the meeting with O'Connor in support of her recollection.
NEWS
January 9, 2006
AS ONE OF THE plaintiffs in the recent successful verdict against the School District of Philadelphia, I take issue with some of the points that Rotan Lee made in his Dec. 28 op-ed, "In Defense of Carl and the Cracker Slur. " I have no problem with Mr. Lee's defense of Carl Singley's outburst as "venting. " What I do resent is his contention that there was "backslapping jocularity between the plaintiffs and the jurors. " First of all, Mr. Lee wasn't there in the courthouse and wouldn't know firsthand what transpired.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For the second time, a federal judge in Philadelphia has dismissed health- damage claims filed by 18 families and individuals who live or lived near the PCB-contaminated Paoli railroad maintenance yard in Chester County. The plaintiffs, 32 people seeking millions of dollars in damages, contend they or their late relatives developed illnesses from exposure to toxic polychlorinated biphenyls, known as PCBs, used for decades in railcar transformers. In a series of opinions released yesterday, U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly concluded that the families had no "prima facie" case, and entered summary judgment in favor of all defendants.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all the polished rhetoric and decorous argumentation by very pricey lawyers, there was no disguising the bare-knuckle nature of the hearing Dec. 17 before U.S. District Judge Jan DuBois in Philadelphia. On its face, the issue was whether Philadelphia lawyer Joseph Kohn would disclose his most private communications in a lawsuit, filed in Ecuador, against energy giant Chevron. The suit alleges that Chevron bears responsibility for pollution in a wide swath of Amazon rain forest in eastern Ecuador, where Texaco, which merged with Chevron in 2001, had oil-drilling operations.
NEWS
May 22, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five African American men who sued Whitemarsh Township and a decorated police sergeant for alleged racial profiling and alleged civil-rights violations will each receive $30,000 as part of a settlement while the two law firms that represented them will get $100,000 each. The case stemmed from allegations brought by fellow officers against former Sgt. Guy Anhorn. In reports to township officials and in depositions in the lawsuit, officers accused Anhorn of targeting blacks, performing illegal searches, and falsifying arrest affidavits.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at Merck & Co. Inc. called them "records retention guidelines" - routine reminders urging employees to manage and reduce the almost unfathomable amount of paperwork generated by the pharmaceutical giant. African American employees, who have filed class-action discrimination lawsuits against Merck in federal courts in Philadelphia and Albany, Ga., saw the July memo as something more sinister: a thinly veiled nudge to bosses to shred records that could hurt Merck in court.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Assemblywoman Maureen Ogden came to the state legislature in 1982 already experienced in an aspect of government that most politicians would just as soon avoid: lawsuits. During the three years that she served as mayor of Millburn, Ogden was sued three times by the township's former attorney. Ogden says those cases were without legal merit, and she points out that the judge who heard the cases dismissed the first two in summary judgments - without hearing arguments - and that he dismissed the third lawsuit after hearing the plaintiff's arguments.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty-one former students at Neumann College in Aston have filed suit against the school, alleging that it did not clearly tell them that its new three-year master's program in physical therapy lacked accreditation when they enrolled in the fall of 1994. As a result, it took the plaintiffs an additional fourth year to get their degrees, according to Media attorney Jon J. Auritt, who filed the suit Tuesday in Delaware County Court. "We have not seen the [lawsuit]. We can't possibly comment," said Stephen Bell, a Neumann College spokesman, yesterday.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After all the hand-wringing and anguish over out-of- state firms flocking to file lawsuits in Philadelphia - the law firms you see advertising on late-night television - is Philadelphia still the notorious plaintiffs' paradise of common lore? It all depends on your idea of civil litigation bliss. A look at medical malpractice awards is revealing. There is no question: Philadelphia remains the most favorable jurisdiction in Pennsylvania for lawyers seeking big payoffs, a maddening fact to the many physicians and hospitals here.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schuylkill County Register of Wills Theresa Santai-Gaffney is trying to pick up where Gov. Corbett left off and defend Pennsylvania's previous same-sex marriage ban. In May, U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III declared the ban unconstitutional, and gay and lesbian couples across the state began tying the knot. Santai-Gaffney has asked Jones to put his ruling on hold and allow her to intervene in the case. If Jones - or a higher court - grants her request, it could halt to same-sex marriage in Pennsylvania, and increase pressure on the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve a disjointed patchwork of laws nationwide.
SPORTS
June 4, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Marino, the Hall of Fame quarterback for the Miami Dolphins and one of the NFL's highest-profile alums, has joined the ranks of former players suing the league over concussion-related injuries. In court filings late last week, Marino, 52, claimed that league officials had long been aware of the long-term effects of repeated hits to the head but chose to ignore those warnings and put players' health at risk. But unlike some of the more than 5,000 ex-players who have filed suit in federal court in Philadelphia, Marino did not specify any explicit condition with which he has struggled in his post-football career.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
T ESS GERRITSEN , the author of the Rizzoli & Isles book series, as well as a number of best-selling suspense novels, filed suit against Warner Bros. on Tuesday, reports TheWrap.com, claiming that the studio based its hit film "Gravity" on her novel. Her book was also called "Gravity" and Warner's New Line subsidiary bought the rights to it in 1999. Gerritsen is seeking 2.5 percent of the film's net profit, according to the New York Times . The author claims that her agreement with Warner promised her a "based upon" credit, if the movie were produced.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
THROUGHOUT history, people have fought the good fight to preserve those things of value and fundamental importance that define the essence of being human. Our Founding Fathers raged against the tyranny of their colonial overlords. African-Americans and their allies rode the freedom train against a virulent tide of bigotry. Women struggled to earn what should have been their birthright - a political voice. Activists like Cesar Chavez labored to bring dignity to the migrant worker. Liberty, equality, respect and a living wage were all things that were won through the sacrifice of people who recognized that certain things in life are neither negotiable, nor free.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a case that has cost tens of millions in legal fees and riveted the attention of legal experts nationwide, a federal judge in New York on Tuesday found that an $18 billion judgment against energy giant Chevron Corp. for polluting a wide swath of the rain forest in Ecuador was procured through fraud, including bribery and doctored experts' reports. In an exhaustive, 485-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan found that lead plaintiffs' lawyer Steven Donziger initiated the fraud in 2006, after it appeared that the case in Ecuador had begun to go against him. Kaplan found that Donziger, who is based in New York, had concealed the fraud from Kohn Swift & Graf, a Philadelphia plaintiffs firm that financed the case until it pulled out in 2009 over concern that Donziger and his team had acted improperly.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL A Superior Court judge on Monday upheld the Cherry Hill Township zoning board's approval of a 152-unit luxury apartment complex to be built at a site most recently occupied by a building materials supplier. In a case that underscored development tensions in one of the state's most heavily built-out municipalities, Judge Lee A. Solomon accepted the board's conclusion that Buckingham Partners L.L.C. of Cherry Hill had met its burden of proof related to variances. He rejected all arguments by the plaintiffs, a group of residents living nearby, who pledged to appeal.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers representing pharmaceuticals saleswomen employed by Merck & Co. have upped the ante in a sexual discrimination lawsuit, adding plaintiffs and setting damages sought at $250 million. "Merck's glass ceiling and maternal walls are indisputable," lawyers for the women wrote in documents filed in federal court in Trenton late Thursday evening. The pleadings say Merck discriminates against saleswomen who "are or have been pregnant or are caregivers to young children" by denying them promotions and failing to compensate them as they do men. Lawyers for the women are seeking class-action status and say the class could include thousands of women.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Accusations are flying in an increasingly acrimonious dispute between attorneys in the federal case over same-sex marriage in Pennsylvania. At issue is a request by the state that the plaintiffs divulge what their attorneys are calling "highly private and sensitive information. " In a letter to U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III, the American Civil Liberties Union legal director in Pennsylvania, Witold J. Walczak, said the state's "invasive and overreaching" requests include whether the gay plaintiffs had been involved in opposite-sex relationships and the identity of sperm donors.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Chevron Corp. has insisted a sprawling environmental-pollution lawsuit in Ecuador initiated by a Philadelphia law firm that resulted in a $19 billion judgment was riddled with fraud. Now, the company is trying to prove its case in a closely watched civil trial in federal district court in New York that could establish new limits on when and where U.S. companies can be sued over claims they caused environmental harm in foreign jurisdictions. Chevron has sued some of the lawyers and others on the plaintiffs' team, saying they doctored one expert-witness report, surreptitiously authored the findings of a court-appointed expert awarding their clients billions, and bribed a judge, among other improper and illegal acts.
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