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NEWS
April 14, 1993 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The civil rights suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union three years ago to change Philadelphia's foster-care system may have moved one step closer to a federal trial date. U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly yesterday rejected the argument of city and state officials, defendants in the case, that the matter should be resolved in Philadelphia Family Court. He ruled that Family Court does not have the jurisdiction or the scope to consider the claims of the 23 foster children who are plaintiffs in the ACLU suit.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Southeast Delco School District has agreed in an out-of-court settlement to pay $80,000 each to two former students who were the victims of sexual abuse by a former special education teacher. The students sued the district in federal court in 1991, saying that district officials had concealed complaints of abuse made against Robert A. Merker Jr., had refused to act on those complaints and had failed to protect students who were minors. Both sides in the civil-rights suits said yesterday that they were glad to put an end to the matter.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | By Kristi Nelson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Neighbors of the Paoli rail yard in Tredyffrin Township won a major victory Tuesday when a federal appeals court revived an eight-year-old lawsuit and upheld their right to sue for having been exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, which have been linked to cancer in animals. Outspoken Paoli activist Mabel Brown, one of the leaders of the neighborhood movement, said that she had not heard the details of the ruling, but that she was happy to hear that her claims would not be ignored.
NEWS
November 5, 2002 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man who says he was raped by a South Jersey priest at age 14 cannot sue the priest or the church because he waited too long to file his claim, a judge ruled yesterday. Peter Pfister, 41, of Lakeland, Fla., sued the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden in 1994, contending that he had been sexually assaulted by Msgr. Philip Rigney, who offered to take him in after he ran away from home as a teenager. Pfister said he fled his Camden home three times because his father, now deceased, had beaten him. When his parents sought to have him held in a juvenile-detention facility, Msgr.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Now it's mostly about the Rev. Betty Patterson and her $8 million lawsuit. The long legal wrangle arising from the 39th District police scandal continued yesterday with a federal judge telling lawyers for the city and the remaining plaintiffs that he wants the remaining five cases settled by the end of the month. If the sides cannot report back to U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell by Aug. 1 with news of a settlement, said lawyer Jennifer St. Hill, the parties will resume preparing for trial.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nine years of delays, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden last week paid $880,000 to 23 men and women who said they had been sexually abused by priests of the diocese. It was a sum far below what the plaintiffs had hoped for, and it left some victims and their attorneys angry. They say that New Jersey law so strictly limits the time young abuse victims can sue their abusers that few cases have a chance to go forward. "It was an absolute travesty," Stephen Rubino, one of the plaintiff lawyers in the case, said Friday.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eleven years after the deadly MOVE confrontation, Philadelphia taxpayers are being asked to take out the checkbook again. Lawyers for MOVE member Ramona Africa and others who won a civil rights suit against the city in June want nearly $2 million to cover their fees and expenses from the decade-long litigation. Lawyer Andre L. Dennis, who represented Africa, filed a petition yesterday in U.S. District Court requesting $861,246.92 for his services and those of other lawyers and paralegals at the firm Stradley, Ronon, Stevens & Young.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After all the hand-wringing and anguish over out-of- state firms flocking to file lawsuits in Philadelphia - the law firms you see advertising on late-night television - is Philadelphia still the notorious plaintiffs' paradise of common lore? It all depends on your idea of civil litigation bliss. A look at medical malpractice awards is revealing. There is no question: Philadelphia remains the most favorable jurisdiction in Pennsylvania for lawyers seeking big payoffs, a maddening fact to the many physicians and hospitals here.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
THROUGHOUT history, people have fought the good fight to preserve those things of value and fundamental importance that define the essence of being human. Our Founding Fathers raged against the tyranny of their colonial overlords. African-Americans and their allies rode the freedom train against a virulent tide of bigotry. Women struggled to earn what should have been their birthright - a political voice. Activists like Cesar Chavez labored to bring dignity to the migrant worker. Liberty, equality, respect and a living wage were all things that were won through the sacrifice of people who recognized that certain things in life are neither negotiable, nor free.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
TWENTY-SIX YEARS ago today, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb on what had once been a quiet leafy neighborhood on Osage Avenue, near Cobbs Creek Park. But Milton Williams is tired of talking about the bomb that started a fire that killed 11 people in the MOVE house and destroyed 61 homes. "I want to know what the city is going to do now," said Williams, 62. "What are they going to do with all of these empty houses?" Williams' community is still home to people who once worked as teachers, nurses, clerical workers, carpenters, police officers, roofers and truck drivers.
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