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BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a case that has cost tens of millions in legal fees and riveted the attention of legal experts nationwide, a federal judge in New York on Tuesday found that an $18 billion judgment against energy giant Chevron Corp. for polluting a wide swath of the rain forest in Ecuador was procured through fraud, including bribery and doctored experts' reports. In an exhaustive, 485-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan found that lead plaintiffs' lawyer Steven Donziger initiated the fraud in 2006, after it appeared that the case in Ecuador had begun to go against him. Kaplan found that Donziger, who is based in New York, had concealed the fraud from Kohn Swift & Graf, a Philadelphia plaintiffs firm that financed the case until it pulled out in 2009 over concern that Donziger and his team had acted improperly.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Columnist
With each passing day, the list of plaintiffs filing concussion lawsuits against the NFL grows. At last check, more than 2,100 former players have filed suit against the league in 74 separate lawsuits, most of which have been consolidated in federal court in Philadelphia. By the end of the summer, the number of plaintiffs could exceed 3,000. The list of plaintiffs includes Hall of Famers like Lem Barney and Joe DeLamielleure and Rickey Jackson and Paul Krause, and Super Bowl MVPs like Mark Rypien and Dexter Jackson.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL A Superior Court judge on Monday upheld the Cherry Hill Township zoning board's approval of a 152-unit luxury apartment complex to be built at a site most recently occupied by a building materials supplier. In a case that underscored development tensions in one of the state's most heavily built-out municipalities, Judge Lee A. Solomon accepted the board's conclusion that Buckingham Partners L.L.C. of Cherry Hill had met its burden of proof related to variances. He rejected all arguments by the plaintiffs, a group of residents living nearby, who pledged to appeal.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
Debra Johnson saw it coming. "Dear God. Not here, where everybody could hear," she thought. She was at a packed college basketball game, sitting alongside her great-niece, who had just learned to count. "And she was holding my hand, which we do all the time," Johnson, 54, recalled in a honeyed, Louisiana drawl. "I could see her counting her fingers, and then she would reach over and . . . count mine. " And then it came. "I have five fingers . . . . You have four?" "Yes, I do. " "Why?"
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $3.5 million settlement has been reached in the federal lawsuits of 87 people who had drug convictions tossed out or charges dropped after Camden police involved in their arrests were linked to possible corruption, the lawyer who represented the city said Wednesday. One plaintiff did not agree to the settlement, finalized Tuesday, said John Eastlack Jr., the city's attorney. That litigation may proceed, he said. The Camden County Prosecutor's Office vacated sentences or dropped cases against 200 people - including the plaintiffs - in 2009, when an FBI investigation alleged that members of a Camden antidrug police unit stole cash and drugs from suspected dealers, fabricated arrest reports, faked evidence, and lied while testifying to grand juries.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
THROUGHOUT history, people have fought the good fight to preserve those things of value and fundamental importance that define the essence of being human. Our Founding Fathers raged against the tyranny of their colonial overlords. African-Americans and their allies rode the freedom train against a virulent tide of bigotry. Women struggled to earn what should have been their birthright - a political voice. Activists like Cesar Chavez labored to bring dignity to the migrant worker. Liberty, equality, respect and a living wage were all things that were won through the sacrifice of people who recognized that certain things in life are neither negotiable, nor free.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Lawyers and plaintiffs are gathered at a press conference yesterday to announce a class-action lawsuit alleging discriminatory practices against female applicants for the SEPTA police. Seated are attorney Heather Bendit (left), plaintiff Altovise Love, and attorney Lisa Rau. Also present were plaintiffs Catherine Lanning and Belinda Kelly Dodson.
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The builder of two private juvenile-detention centers at the heart of the "kids for cash" corruption case has agreed to pay $17.75 million to settle all civil-rights claims that resulted from the scandal, lawyers said Friday. Robert K. Mericle's construction company built the for-profit detention facilities that replaced the Luzerne County detention center. Mericle and Robert Powell, who co-owned the centers, paid several million dollars to two county judges, one of whom sentenced juveniles to the facilities from 2003 to 2008.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flames leap from the gavel on the cover of a new report that declares Philadelphia No. 1 among the nation's "Judicial Hellholes. " For the second year in a row. South Jersey overall and Atlantic County in particular were not among the top seven, but did make a "Watch List. " The report, released Wednesday, focuses on perceived abuses in civil courts, not criminal ones, and comes from the American Tort Reform Foundation, which represents businesses, municipalities and professional associations.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | By Susan Q. Stranahan and Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Feb. 2, 1978, a spectacular fire erupted at an illegal chemical dump in Chester. More than 200 emergency workers were unwittingly exposed to toxic industrial wastes. High rates of cancer and other serious illnesses have beset the group ever since. Today, in the conclusion of an eight-day series, the legacy - and the unfinished business - of the Wade dump fire. Lillian Cornish could not stop trembling. Maria Boyle felt cowed and alone. Judy McLaughlin was upset, yet relieved to have it over with.
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