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NEWS
January 29, 1997 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Lawyers and plaintiffs are gathered at a press conference yesterday to announce a class-action lawsuit alleging discriminatory practices against female applicants for the SEPTA police. Seated are attorney Heather Bendit (left), plaintiff Altovise Love, and attorney Lisa Rau. Also present were plaintiffs Catherine Lanning and Belinda Kelly Dodson.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
TWENTY-SIX YEARS ago today, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb on what had once been a quiet leafy neighborhood on Osage Avenue, near Cobbs Creek Park. But Milton Williams is tired of talking about the bomb that started a fire that killed 11 people in the MOVE house and destroyed 61 homes. "I want to know what the city is going to do now," said Williams, 62. "What are they going to do with all of these empty houses?" Williams' community is still home to people who once worked as teachers, nurses, clerical workers, carpenters, police officers, roofers and truck drivers.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer representing plaintiffs in federal litigation over the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment asserted in a filing Thursday that Conrail misled the court about its training program, leading to an adverse ruling against those suing over the accident and chemical spill. The filing in U.S. District Court in Camden claims an affidavit by a Conrail risk officer provided false testimony, and that the company's training program for conductors - approved by the Federal Railroad Administration months before the Nov. 30, 2012, derailment - was withheld in court.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | By Susan Q. Stranahan and Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Feb. 2, 1978, a spectacular fire erupted at an illegal chemical dump in Chester. More than 200 emergency workers were unwittingly exposed to toxic industrial wastes. High rates of cancer and other serious illnesses have beset the group ever since. Today, in the conclusion of an eight-day series, the legacy - and the unfinished business - of the Wade dump fire. Lillian Cornish could not stop trembling. Maria Boyle felt cowed and alone. Judy McLaughlin was upset, yet relieved to have it over with.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's system of education funding is broken, and the courts must force lawmakers to make it right, attorneys for school districts, parents, and organizations that have sued the commonwealth told a panel of judges here Wednesday. The suit - brought by school systems, including the William Penn district in Delaware County, and parents, including two from the Philadelphia School District - argues that Pennsylvania's education funding system is "irrational and inequitable.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has dismissed a civil rights lawsuit by some Lower Merion School District parents, students, and former students who claimed the district discriminated against them and other African American students by disproportionately and inappropriately placing them in special-education programs and in the lowest-level classes. The ruling in Amber Blunt et al v. Lower Merion School District et al was handed down Thursday by U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle 3d, who wrote that there was "no direct or circumstantial evidence of racial discrimination.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | By Lisa Sandberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of Liberian immigrants has sued five present and former Darby Borough police officers, alleging that they broke up a children's birthday party without cause, then assaulted and arrested at least six adults. The suit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, says the plaintiffs - seven adults and seven children - were "subjected to an extreme and outrageous invasion of privacy" and in some instances suffered serious bodily harm on June 29, 1996. The suit charges that the officers, all of whom are white, acted out of racial and ethnic bias against the plaintiffs, all of whom are black.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Montgomery County Commissioners Chairman Josh Shapiro, a Democrat, and seven other local plaintiffs filed an appeal Monday opposing the state's latest Republican-drawn redistricting plan. The most recent maps - released June 8 - would divide Montgomery County into eight Senate and 19 House districts, none of which lies entirely within the county, and cut district lines through several townships and boroughs. The plaintiffs called the plan "overtly political" and argued that it violates a state constitutional mandate to keep counties and cities together in one representative district "unless absolutely necessary.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade ago, the telecommunications company RCN Corp. viewed itself as a potential competitor to Comcast Corp. One national magazine wrote about it as "The Little Phone Company That Can?" Then, according to a long-running antitrust lawsuit in Philadelphia federal court, Comcast thwarted RCN's expansion into cable-TV business in Philadelphia by lobbying against RCN with government officials, offering customers discounts in areas where RCN would expand, and restricting RCN's access to contractors who would build out its network.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout the bitterly fought legal battle over allegations that Chevron despoiled hundreds of square miles of once-pristine Amazon jungle in eastern Ecuador, rife as it is with charges of fraud and corruption, the plaintiffs consistently have argued their science is sound and the Ecuadoran judicial system is well-equipped to evaluate it. But on March 7, their case was dealt a severe setback. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, ruling in Manhattan, unleashed a withering broadside barring the plaintiffs, at least for the moment, from seeking to enforce an $18 billion judgment handed down by an Ecuadoran judge against Chevron.
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