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NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY OSCAR CASTILLO, Daily News Staff Writer castilo@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
AMID THE celebration of yesterday's Supreme Court ruling, a former Temple Owl flies high. Edith Schlain Windsor, 84, plaintiff in the historic gay-marriage case, grew up in Philadelphia and received her bachelor's degree from Temple University's College of Liberal Arts in 1950. Her father lost his candy-and-ice-cream store in Philly and then his house in the Depression, according to the New York Times . Windsor sued over the federal government's insistence in the Defense of Marriage Act that a marriage can only be defined as a relationship between a man and a woman.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty-four plaintiffs, including a dozen police officers who rushed to the scene of a November train derailment in Paulsboro, sued on Monday, alleging that the rail company's negligence caused the derailment, and that it downplayed the dangers of a chemical spill and failed to protect responders. As a result, the suit says, the plaintiffs have suffered ailments such as breathing problems, headaches, neurological disorders, and elevated blood pressure since the tanker carrying 23,000 gallons of vinyl chloride derailed Nov. 30. Investigators have determined that the freight train crossed the automated drawbridge over Mantua Creek against a red light after the crew got the go-ahead from a dispatcher.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade ago, the telecommunications company RCN Corp. viewed itself as a potential competitor to Comcast Corp. One national magazine wrote about it as "The Little Phone Company That Can?" Then, according to a long-running antitrust lawsuit in Philadelphia federal court, Comcast thwarted RCN's expansion into cable-TV business in Philadelphia by lobbying against RCN with government officials, offering customers discounts in areas where RCN would expand, and restricting RCN's access to contractors who would build out its network.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many class-action settlements, the $3.5 billion payout announced in 1999 by the makers of the diet drug Fen-Phen unleashed a stampede of claims, including thousands that were bogus. Many came courtesy of Abdur Razzak Tai, a Florida cardiologist who expected more than $1,000 from a plaintiffs' lawyer each time he certified a Fen-Phen patient with heart damage - a marker that often led to a six-figure payout. Tai signed more than 12,000 physician reports over several years.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court, in a decision released Wednesday, voted 5-4 along ideological lines in favor of Comcast Corp. in a consumer class-action lawsuit that has been grinding its way through the Philadelphia federal courts since December 2003. The suit claims to represent two million Philadelphia-area Comcast TV customers who it says were harmed by anticompetitive business practices, and seeks $875 million in damages. The courts in Philadelphia certified the consumers as a class to collectively sue, but the Supreme Court overturned their rulings.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawsuit filed by seven Pennsauken police reads like the wild, wild West. There are barroom brawls, allegations of an extramarital affair, and a police chief who allegedly won't speak to his underlings. The May 7, 2011, brawl at the Pinsetter bowling alley on Maple Avenue involved some of the plaintiffs and other off-duty police, with two plaintiffs contending they were sucker-punched. "The whole thing at Pinsetter's becomes a fiasco," said lawyer Katherine Hartman, who filed the suit in Camden federal court Friday.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Hillary Siegel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six students who sued the trustees of the University of Pennsylvania for poor living conditions in an off-campus house reached a settlement with the university Monday. A representative of the University of Pennsylvania confirmed that settlement was reached. According to court documents, two of the plaintiffs, Zachary Opperman and Andrew Green, filed a declaration of withdrawal and the motion was granted withdrawn without prejudice on Monday. The terms of the settlement were confidential.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taxpayers are going to pick up more than half of the $3.5 million payout to 88 people whose drug convictions were thrown out after investigators determined they had been arrested by a group of rogue Camden police officers. U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider, who oversaw the consolidated cases, ordered the city to pay the settlement by Feb. 15. Jason Williamson, a New Jersey ACLU lawyer, whose office represented one of the plaintiffs, said Thursday that lawyers were still working out how much each client would receive.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $3.5 million settlement has been reached in the federal lawsuits of 87 people who had drug convictions tossed out or charges dropped after Camden police involved in their arrests were linked to possible corruption, the lawyer who represented the city said Wednesday. One plaintiff did not agree to the settlement, finalized Tuesday, said John Eastlack Jr., the city's attorney. That litigation may proceed, he said. The Camden County Prosecutor's Office vacated sentences or dropped cases against 200 people - including the plaintiffs - in 2009, when an FBI investigation alleged that members of a Camden antidrug police unit stole cash and drugs from suspected dealers, fabricated arrest reports, faked evidence, and lied while testifying to grand juries.
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