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SPORTS
June 4, 2012
More than 2,000 former NFL players have filed lawsuits arguing that the league did not do enough to make players aware of the potential effects of concussions - a charge the NFL has said it would vigorously contest. The suits, more than 70 in all, are being consolidated in Philadelphia under U.S. District Judge Anita Brody. The next steps involve an exchange of filings from the plaintiffs and the league. According to the NFL, Brody has set the following time line for the cases, one that indicates that it will be months, at least, before the substance of the cases can be heard: By June 8, plaintiffs must submit a master administrative complaint.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | Amy Worden
Judge rejects group's bid to join voter-ID suit HARRISBURG — A Commonweath Court judge has thrown out a petition by a bipartisan group seeking to intervene on behalf of the state in a lawsuit over Pennsylvania's new voter-identification law. In his ruling Tuesday, Judge Robert Simpson said the eight petitioners, among them Rep. Thomas Killion (R., Chester), offered "no proof to support their claims of ‘voter dilution' or potential loss of an equal opportunity to participate in the voting process.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
With each passing day, the list of plaintiffs filing concussion lawsuits against the NFL grows. At last check, more than 2,100 former players have filed suit against the league in 74 separate lawsuits, most of which have been consolidated in federal court in Philadelphia. By the end of the summer, the number of plaintiffs could exceed 3,000. The list of plaintiffs includes Hall of Famers like Lem Barney and Joe DeLamielleure and Rickey Jackson and Paul Krause, and Super Bowl MVPs like Mark Rypien and Dexter Jackson.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG — The legal battle over the state's voter identification law has taken a new turn with a group of eight Pennsylvania residents filing a motion to block a request by the plaintiffs to seek a speedy outcome. The bipartisan group, led by State Rep. Thomas Killion (R., Chester), filed a petition in Commonwealth Court to intervene in support of the new law, saying its members' rights as registered voters would be violated if the law, designed to curb voter fraud, does not take effect in November.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Amy Worden and Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Wartime welder, civil-rights marcher, world traveler, voter - Viviette Applewhite of Philadelphia's Germantown section can boast of having been all those things. On Tuesday, she added another title: plaintiff. Applewhite, who is 93 and uses a wheelchair, became the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit filed here in state court by the ACLU and the NAACP challenging Pennsylvania's new law requiring voters to produce a driver's license or other photo identification before they are allowed to vote.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine years after filing their first legal complaint, Comcast customers who contend that the cable television giant undercut competitors with unfair pricing policies and other anticompetitive strategies can take their claims to a jury. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova, sitting in Philadelphia, said Comcast customers had presented evidence during pretrial proceedings showing that the company had offered lower prices and extended contracts in a way that may have driven out competition.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
The University of Pennsylvania law school on Monday officially dedicated a new courtroom at Golkin Hall that was funded by Philadelphia plaintiffs lawyers Thomas Kline and Shanin Specter, on behalf of their law firm, Kline & Specter P.C. The courtroom will be used for student education and includes the latest in courtroom technology, the law firm said. Golkin Hall, a newly constructed 40,000 square foot addition to the law school campus, itself will be officially dedicated April 5 at an event to be attended by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By Michael Kunzelman and Harry R. Weber, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - BP and a committee representing plaintiffs suing over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill have reached an agreement, a federal judge said late Friday night. As a result of the agreement that will be filed with the court for approval, the trial that was scheduled to begin Monday has been postponed a second time, Judge Carl Barbier said. No new date was immediately set. The settlement will likely result in a realignment of the parties in this litigation and require substantial changes to the current trial plan, Barbier said.
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The builder of two private juvenile-detention centers at the heart of the "kids for cash" corruption case has agreed to pay $17.75 million to settle all civil-rights claims that resulted from the scandal, lawyers said Friday. Robert K. Mericle's construction company built the for-profit detention facilities that replaced the Luzerne County detention center. Mericle and Robert Powell, who co-owned the centers, paid several million dollars to two county judges, one of whom sentenced juveniles to the facilities from 2003 to 2008.
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