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NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a rough time to be a regional planner. With the economy in prolonged slump and election season upon us, planners - that cadre of workaday civil servants for whom grand road design, smartly executed shopping centers, and effective use of open space get the blood pumping - are fighting an uphill battle. "State and local governments are stressed. There's less money going around. And politicians don't know which way to turn," said Paul Farmer, executive director of the American Planning Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011
DEAR ABBY : I am a confident, well-established administrative professional. I organized a very large company party and, because my regular caterer didn't specialize in the kind of barbecue that was needed, I took a chance on an unknown one. In the end, it was the most humiliating disaster I've ever experienced. Not only was there not enough food, but it was presented in a sloppy, unprofessional manner. No beverages arrived, so we had to do without them for the event. I have never had anything like this happen before.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
G. STOCKTON Strawbridge looked out of the front window of his department store on East Market Street, regarded the banging pile-drivers, the grinding trucks, the dust, the torn-up asphalt and smiled. He was a happy man because the project of converting East Market Street from the dreary, shabby thoroughfare it had become was the dream of a lifetime. And who better to make that dream come true than John F. Collins? John Collins, a landscape architect, urban planner and a man who didn't hesitate to get on his knees in the dirt and plant flowers, was the head of Delta Group, which had the contract in the late '80s to restore a commercial street that had once been Philadelphia's major thoroughfare.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Organizers of a flotilla to challenge Israel's sea blockade of the Gaza Strip say they'll sail any day now, but they are struggling to overcome delays that they attribute to Israeli pressure. They have held regular news conferences to talk up their campaign, but they are so cautious that they will not say where their boats are docked. Dire warnings and diplomatic sensitivities shadow the politically charged plan to deliver aid to the Palestinian territory. The fear is a reprise of a similar mission a year ago that ended when nine activists on a Turkish vessel died in a raid by Israeli commandos.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A tolled and locally managed Route 422 could become an engine for driving large-scale road-improvement projects in the future, state transportation leaders said Monday. That is, if the plan doesn't stall out before it can begin. Regional planners made their best pitch before a state advisory panel in Harrisburg on Monday for turning portions of the 27-mile state highway into a toll road. Under the plan, the 11-cents-per-mile access fee would go directly toward funding projects to relieve the highway's notorious rush-hour gridlock.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By DOM GIORDANO
THANKS to the policy at a Chicago public school that made news recently, I was taken back to my days at King of Peace Elementary School. It wasn't a pleasant trip down memory lane. Little Village Academy in the Windy City has banned bag lunches from home in order to protect kids from their own "unhealthful" food choices. It reminded me of my eight years of "no food from home" and rotten school lunches of overcooked pork and food that would make scrapple appetizing. It was so bad I developed ploys like burying the food inside the rancid mashed potatoes and telling the lunch monitor I just didn't like mashed potatoes.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vincent T. Cangelosi, 56, of Haddon Heights, an urban planner who developed many residential projects in South Jersey for low-income families and the elderly, died of pancreatic cancer on Saturday, Jan. 15, at his home. After moving to Blackwood to attend Camden County College and then to Camden to finish his degree in urban planning at Rutgers University, Mr. Cangelosi developed a passion for the revitalization of small cities. From the time he started working in 1977 at the Camden County Community Development office, Mr. Cangelosi garnered a reputation for being able to plan affordable-housing projects that would come to fruition, said those who knew him. During his 25 years in urban planning, Mr. Cangelosi was most proud of the Mill Block housing renovations in Gloucester City and a Ferry Station housing project in Camden, said his son Nick.
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
There might be no more frustrating, dashboard-banging, horn-worthy commute in the Philadelphia suburbs than Route 422's 25-mile stretch. But are local drivers willing to pay to ease that daily backup? It depends on how you ask the question, regional planners say. The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission and a host of local governments have launched a public-relations campaign extolling the benefits of adding tolls to the congested highway. Their efforts, including an extensive website at www.422plus.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joanne Barnes Jackson, 68, a regional planner, died of hypertensive cardiovascular disease Friday, Oct. 29, at her home in the Cedar Park neighborhood of West Philadelphia. Mrs. Jackson was the former executive director of the Advocate Community Development Corp., at 18th and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia. The agency helped restore housing for low- and moderate-income households in the Diamond Street Historic District and tried to preserve the neighborhood's heritage. "We have the largest, richest collection of Victorian buildings in Philadelphia," she told an Inquirer interviewer in 2003, "and right now they are lost from public consciousness.
NEWS
November 12, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
One doesn't sell one's soul lightly. Unless one is truly committed to a cause that will improve the lives of needy people. Speaking metaphorically, of course, Joanne Barnes Jackson, contemplating the incomplete work her organization was doing to rehab a chunk of North Philadelphia in 2001 and bring in commercial development, told Daily News columnist Elmer Smith: "I'd sell my soul for a Wawa. But I've sold it so many times now. " That kind of commitment and dedication marked the life of Joanne Jackson as she worked for years to restore the many blocks of crumbling homes in her native city that may have seemed lost to decay and indifference.
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