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Plant Operators

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NEWS
January 17, 1987 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. demonstrated Thursday that it could protect the health and safety of the public during an accident at its Limerick power plant in Montgomery County, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said yesterday. "There were no significant deficiencies identified by the inspectors," the NRC reported yesterday in its preliminary findings on an annual drill required for all plants licensed by the federal agency. The NRC said that "there will be some areas where we believe there is room for improvement" and that those areas would be discussed when its complete inspection report is released in four to six weeks.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are beginning to zero in on what caused a series of malfunctions that forced the Salem I nuclear power plant to declare a seven-hour emergency alert Thursday. The alert was the longest and one of the most serious in the history of the 17-year-old generating station, operated by the Public Service Electric & Gas Co. As eight inspectors fanned over the complex yesterday, NRC officials began to gain a sense of what had happened, they said.
NEWS
April 2, 1987
A week ago - eight years to the month after the near-meltdown at Three Mile Island - a nuclear industry spokesman was recounting how plant operators had reformed. "Staffing is deeper, training is better . . . ," GPU Nuclear's public relations chief D.H. Bedell told a Bucks County audience. Yet the image of an unrepentent industry persists, etched ever deeper by critics, the press in particular. Mr. Bedell had no way of knowing that Philadelphia Electric Co.'s Peach Bottom plant would only days later be ordered on "cold shutdown" after federal regulators found an immediate threat to public safety: a pervasive practice of control-room employees' sleeping on the job. But his speech revealed, nevertheless, what has become for nuclear operators a self-defeating delusion.
NEWS
July 15, 1987
No one ever said that working at a nuclear plant was a rose garden. The jobs can get boring indeed - monitoring the bells and whistles, staring at instrument consoles. You get the impression that - for control room technicians and even some shift supervisors - it's a bit like being a Maytag repairman. But there's a $1 billion cleanup going on these days at the Three Mile Island plant that's testimony to the importance of staying alert at the wheel of these smoothly humming, but occasionally ornery atomic reactors.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Calling management problems at Philadelphia Electric "just as serious" as those plaguing operators at PE's Peach Bottom nuclear plant, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission yesterday refused to lift an order shutting the plant after workers were caught sleeping on the job. "I'm not going to accept what you say today and be anywhere near ready to authorize this plant," NRC Chairman Lando Zech told PE Chairman and Chief Executive Officer J. Lee Everett...
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Calling corporate management problems at Philadelphia Electric Co. "just as serious" as those plaguing operators at PE's Peach Bottom plant, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission yesterday refused to lift an order that shut down the nuclear plant after workers were caught sleeping on the job. "I'm not going to accept what you say today and be anywhere near ready to authorize this plant," NRC Chairman Lando Zech told PE Chairman and Chief Executive Officer...
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Control room personnel at the Hope Creek nuclear power plant violated safety regulations during a test in November, ignoring warnings from Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors on the scene, the agency said yesterday, announcing a fine on the plant's operators. The NRC proposed a $50,000 fine for Public Service Electric & Gas Co., which owns 95 percent of Hope Creek and operates that plant and the two Salem nuclear plants at the same site. The fine is subject to a hearing, but Patricia DuBois, a spokeswoman for the utility, said "PSE&G is not going to contest it. " PSE&G is in the midst of restarting its Salem 1 generator, which has been shut down since May 1995 following a series of mechanical failures and human errors.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Department of Environmental Protection said yesterday it would allow development in Central Bucks County to continue and not ban new connections to the Chalfont-New Britain Sewage Treatment Plant. Joseph Feola, acting regional director of the DEP, said the plant, which was designed to treat 5 million gallons per day of wastewater and has handled on average 5.4 million gallons per day, could treat the high flows effectively. "We aren't concerned with the volume," Feola said.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State and local officials have discovered that seven Bucks County treatment plants have experienced high wastewater flows that sent partially treated sewage and chemicals into local creeks and streams. Those plants - the Chalfont-New Britain, Dublin, Pennridge, Bedminster, Green Street, Harvey Avenue, and Bristol Township sewage treatment plants - will all be scrutinized by state Department of Environmental Protection water-quality experts, the DEP's community-relations coordinator, John Gerdelmann, said yesterday.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gauges fell, warning lights flashed, and horns blared inside the mock control room at the Millstone nuclear power plant. Something was seriously amiss. The signals said that the water level was dropping inside the nuclear reactor. Pressure was building inside the surrounding containment vessel. And a critical emergency safety system, which should have automatically kicked in, failed. So did the plant's control room operators. For more than 10 minutes, they couldn't figure out what was happening.
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NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When David Lochbaum, director of the Nuclear Safety Project for the Union of Concerned Scientists, began to hear of the Sandy-related storm problems at the Oyster Creek nuclear plant in Ocean County, he had an "I-told-you-so moment. " In March 2011, Japan was reeling from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster that stemmed from natural events - an earthquake and tsunami. "What we learned at Fukushima is being reinforced by Sandy," said Lochbaum, who says that the process that regulators use to license nuclear plants is flawed.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Jane Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Oyster Creek nuclear power plant remains on "alert" status even as the rising waters that caused problems with the reactor's pumping system continue to abate, a spokesman for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday. Despite the "alert" status, which is the second least serious level, the reactor, located in Lacey Township, Ocean County, is considered "safe," he said. The Oyster Creek facility was impacted by the storm in three ways - rising water in intake canals affected pump performance in an intake structure; a power outage in the area also hit the plant, causing it to switch to back up generator to power the facility, and winds and weather took out 21 of about 50 warning sirens positioned in a 10-mile radius of the plant, said spokesman Neil Sheehan.
NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Intermittently over a period of five years, the operator of a Montgomery County sewage-treatment plant wasn't testing the outflow and wasn't treating it, according to law enforcement officials. He was simply discharging raw sewage into the Perkiomen Creek, they said. The state Attorney General's Office has filed criminal charges against the operator, Pennsburg resident Michael T. Martin, who was fired months ago from the Green Lane Marlborough Joint Authority. He faces a maximum of 18 years in prison and $40,000 in fines for allegedly allowing untreated or partially treated sewage to flow into the stream and for fabricating sampling data that he submitted to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
The operator of a Montgomery County water treatment facility has been charged with discharging sewage into the Perkiomen Creek over a period of five years, the State Attorney General's Office announced this morning. The criminal charges allege that Michael Martin of Pennsburg also submitted falsified reports to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Attorney General Tom Corbett said in a statement that Martin was the operator of the Green Lane Marlborough Joint Authority waste water treatment plant on Gravel Road in Green Lane.
NEWS
November 12, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence H. O'Donnell, 88, a former DuPont Co. official and the father of former Chester County Commissioner Patrick O'Donnell, died of heart failure Nov. 1 at Barclay Friends, a senior community in West Chester. A native of St. Louis, Mr. O'Donnell graduated from McBride High School there. He was a football lineman for a year at the University of Dayton before graduating from the University of Missouri in 1942 with a degree in chemical engineering. Mr. O'Donnell was an officer on the destroyer Marshall during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in October 1944, leaving the Navy at war's end as a lieutenant commander.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A tan, nondescript, one-story office building tucked off a road in Coatesville houses an anomaly. The 22,000-square-foot Chester County facility holds a state-of-the-art media and communications center, with wireless dataport technology, Webcasting, and a generous work area for reporters. But the plan is to keep it empty. Why? Because reporters will go there only to cover bad and alarming news. The sole purpose of the building is to brief the media - and through them, the public - during a nuclear emergency at Limerick, Peach Bottom and, starting next week, Three Mile Island.
NEWS
July 22, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Coatesville man entrusted with operating multiple sewage plants throughout Chester County did so for more than 2 1/2 years without a license, state authorities said yesterday. Thomas M. Horrex, 54, was charged yesterday with three misdemeanor counts of unlawful conduct under the state's Clean Streams Law, according to a news release from Attorney General Tom Corbett. Each count carries a maximum penalty of two years in prison and a $5,000 fine, the release said. Horrex, who could not be reached for comment, allowed his sewage treatment plant operator's license to expire on Dec. 31, 2005, but continued to test wastewater and operate sewage plants in Elverson Borough, Penn and East Goshen Townships - facilities that required a licensed operator, the criminal complaint said.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a gorgeous day for racing on the Schuylkill yesterday, with the sun shining and water sparkling - and it was all the more exhilarating after a health advisory that nearly threatened to keep rowers on dry land. The 78 races in the Schuylkill Navy Regatta were going "superbly," Clete Graham, commodore of the Schuylkill Navy, said as he sat on the awards grandstand by the Columbia Bridge. "There were no qualms, no hesitations. It was a beautiful day. " About 600 athletes from 42 clubs came out. They were thrilled to compete, and didn't see any signs of a Montgomery County fish kill, Graham said.
NEWS
June 4, 2002 | By Peter Sigal INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four years after an overextended sewage plant spewed partially treated wastewater into the Neshaminy Creek, the Bucks County Water and Sewer Authority continues to connect customers, even though the agency has used up its available capacity, plant operators say. The Chalfont-New Britain Joint Sewage Authority, which runs the plant and shares capacity with the county, seeks an injunction that would halt connections to the plant by the county authority...
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