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NEWS
August 13, 2006 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Chester County Art Association sent out a call for artists to participate in a community arts project to mark its 75th anniversary, Rhoda Kahler was eager to sign up. She knew exactly what the subject of her piece of art would be. "People," said Kahler, a tile artist and teacher at the art association who particularly liked the public aspect of the project. Called Growing the Arts, the project involved creating 75 planters, each custom painted by local artists and school groups.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2008 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Falling tomato plants have injured 155 Americans so far this year as China-built stands for growing the fruit in hanging bags have collapsed on gardeners and bystanders, federal officials said. The Consumer Product Safety Commission announced yesterday a recall of 82,000 Topsy-Turvy Deluxe Tomato Planters and Stands. The devices were imported by Allstar Marketing Group L.L.C., of Hawthorne, N.Y., and sold by Liberty Media Holding Corp.'s QVC Inc. division, of West Chester, through its TV and Internet programs and stores, for $30 each in March and April.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL S. WIRTZ
In front of the Academy of Natural Sciences, garden design contractor Liz Pailey takes old geraniums from planters and replaces them with new chrysanthemums. The flowers are changed twice a year.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Maria Archangelo, Special to The Inquirer
Jenkintown Borough Council members received copies of the 1988 township budget but declined to discuss it Monday night because borough manager William J. Richardson was not present to give an overview of the proposals. According to council President Judith O'Neill, the budget does not have a summary cover letter listing anticipated expenditures and revenues or millage information, and the council members did not have time to review it before the meeting. Council Vice President Thomas Oliver 3d said Richardson told him that he expected expenditures to increase by $145,000 next year, but that the borough had a cash surplus of $158,321 for 1988.
NEWS
September 24, 1990
A friend who walks to work through Center City discovered recently that he had unconsciously changed his route. Where he used to walk down Walnut Street past Rittenhouse Square, cut up to Sansom and then do a block or two of Chestnut, he now often heads straight up to Market Street and does most of his walking on that supposedly soulless boulevard of bank branches and office towers. The reason? The construction and remodeling on Market Street west of City Hall is almost completed, and the improvements are being felt at ground level.
NEWS
December 28, 1991
Only one blot seems to sully the general improvement in cleanliness of Center City resulting from the successful efforts of the Center City District's street and sidewalk cleaners. The area right around the Municipal Services building, notably the sunken plaza along the Broad Street side (the one with the dead tree display in one of its planters) is still often aswirl with slightly used Kleenex, cups, cans and other crud. The reason, we're told, is that this is one area that's still the sole responsibility of city workers.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By Garen Meguerian, Special to The Inquirer
The beauty in nature is the last thing that crosses the mind of a person stuck in highway traffic. However, if the Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania has its way, all Pennsylvania highway motorists will be able to occasionally glance at, if not stop and smell, the flowers. The Garden Club Federation, in cooperation with PennDOT, has undertaken a statewide wildflower-planting program. The planters began by seeding last November at several sites in the five-county Philadelphia area.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coatesville's sidewalks are in for a face lift. The city recently asked contractors to bid for its Streetscapes project, which will revamp the sidewalks. Gone will be the cracked, gray sidewalks and rough-hewn, uneven curb line, said project manager Diane Bernardo. In its place will be interlocking bricks and a smooth, level curb. "We're trying to create a ribbon effect," said Bernardo, pointing down Lincoln Highway, adding that the smooth look will tell visitors, "C'mon into our city.
NEWS
December 29, 1986 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout the island of Negros, people are praying for peace but preparing for war. The government is trying to persuade the sugar cane planters who own the land to share it with two million landless peasants. It will be a crucial test of President Corazon C. Aquino's ability to reshape the Philippines. The planters are struggling to preserve the source of their power. The politicians in this provincial capital, the parish priests in the villages and the peasants in the cane fields say that if change does not come soon, combat will.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long before the T-shirt vendors set up shop on the sidewalks and the homeless moved into a nearby subway station, even before John Wanamaker built his great retail store across the way, St. John the Evangelist Church stood in stone splendor on 13th Street. Since 1830, St. John's has been among the principal churches of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It was once the parish of the city's Catholic elite and later a spiritual home for thousands of Catholics who work in Center City.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cara Schneider Bongiorno and her husband, Charles Bongiorno, a physician, are true Philadelphians: They've made the most of their 20-by-12-foot concrete back yard by converting it into a graceful garden and May-through-November party space with seating. Many city residents rely on a concrete pad behind their homes to serve as their "outdoors. " The Bongiornos were determined to bring true green to their space and to decorate it in a way that would be inviting for a barbecue with friends, a glass of wine in the evenings after work, or just a quiet refuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seeds of Meei-Ling Ng's future life as an artist and urban farmer in Philadelphia were planted early, and far away, in the village of Lim Chu Kang, in a rural corner of Singapore. With three siblings, she grew up on a five-acre farm, where the family grew orchids, raised ducks, turkeys, chickens, and pigs, and pets - cats, dogs, rabbits, parrots - were plentiful. "It was heaven for us," recalls Ng, pronounced ung , who smiles wistfully at the memory of her grandmother's rambutan, mango, coconut, and jackfruit trees.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
I LOVE LOVE Park. It's not perfect - few things are in Philly - but it is a gem. The iconic Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture frames a view up the Parkway to the Art Museum that could compete with any cityscape. It's a Philadelphia classic that attracts camera-toting visitors day and night. The main thing wrong with LOVE Park is not the design, but the people - the ones who litter (attracting rats), the ones who skateboard (scarring surfaces and cracking tiles) and the serenity-shattering panhandlers.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
A TODDLER in a blue baseball cap sat Wednesday in a stroller eating ice cream in West Philadelphia. His mother sat next to him in an orange bistro chair. Only six months ago, right where the pair were relaxing in the late-summer sun, cars and buses whizzed through what was a traffic triangle at 42nd Street and Woodland Avenue. Now the triangle is blocked off by large wooden planters filled with flowers and trees, and a small, dangerous "redundant" street has been removed to create a new minipark.
NEWS
November 1, 2011 | Staff Report
What a way to start National Peanut Butter Month. Following one of the worst peanut harvests in decades, peanut butter prices are shooting up. CNNMoney reports that Kraft is raising prices for its Planters brand peanut butter by 40 percent while ConAgra has already increased the price for its Peter Pan by 20 percent. ( http://cnnmon.ie/rvtoiT ) J.M. Smucker, the maker of Jif, will hike prices by about 30 percent, CNNMoney says. No word yet from Unilever on pricing for its Skippy brand.
NEWS
May 13, 2011
Near the end of her recent lecture at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Andrea Wulf touched on the role slavery played in the agrarian and horticultural lives of our nation's early presidents. Too bad it came at the end of her talk. It's one of the most fascinating parts of her new book Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation (Alfred A. Knopf, $30). For while she deftly conveys the idea that George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison were passionate to the point of obsession about their fields, crops, seeds, and - as they say in the trade nowadays - "ornamentals and edibles," Wulf also lays out the details of a disquieting and not altogether unfamiliar truth: that, for three of those presidents, a belief in liberty and equality coexisted with slave ownership.
NEWS
May 7, 2010 | By Karen Deer, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
Are you a scavenger? If you are, maybe you'll be lucky enough to find a Radio Flyer stuffed into a city trash bin, as we did. It was old and rusty and could barely move. We grabbed it. If not, you may want to hold on to some of your other junk for use along your garden paths, patios and porches. With the help of a garden center, the red wagon was transformed into a lavish garden centerpiece, filled with annuals, perennials, and herbs. You can personalize your garden with old junky items scavenged from basements, garage sales, and flea markets.
LIVING
April 23, 2010 | By Dean Loftis FOR THE INQUIRER
Today, April 23, generally is acknowledged as William Shakespeare's birthday, though many zealous bardolators and academic types quibble over this and virtually every other detail of the enigmatic Bard's life and works. Whether or not this is the date, it is poetically apropos to believe the great Bard's birthday would fall amid the first stirrings of spring, when nature awakens from her wintry slumber, flora comes to life in a profusion of colors and scents and fauna frolic about the garden.
NEWS
April 4, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It sounds a bit like a pet rock for gardeners, but consumers seem to love the upside-down Topsy Turvy tomato planter, which has been sprouting all over the marketplace. Bill Felknor, a folksy inventor from Knoxville, Tenn., has sold millions of his curious creations since they first appeared on QVC in 2003 - more than seven million last year alone, making it one of the most popular gardening products ever introduced. "I give the good Lord 100 percent of the credit," Felknor said of his "hanging gardens," which grow tomatoes out the bottom of a soil-filled bag and are watered from the top. Skeptics (there are many)
BUSINESS
June 5, 2008 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Falling tomato plants have injured 155 Americans so far this year as China-built stands for growing the fruit in hanging bags have collapsed on gardeners and bystanders, federal officials said. The Consumer Product Safety Commission announced yesterday a recall of 82,000 Topsy-Turvy Deluxe Tomato Planters and Stands. The devices were imported by Allstar Marketing Group L.L.C., of Hawthorne, N.Y., and sold by Liberty Media Holding Corp.'s QVC Inc. division, of West Chester, through its TV and Internet programs and stores, for $30 each in March and April.
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