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NEWS
August 10, 2009 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Jon Dorenbos was at a spring practice suffering from one of his bouts with long-snapper's elbow. The Philadelphia Eagles center, whose specialty is the long centering pass to punters and placekickers, often got severe discomfort in his left elbow from those repeated hard flicks in practice and in games. The technical term is medial epicondylitis, and while it can afflict almost anyone's funny bone, it can be excruciating for athletes who make their living doing such irregular motions.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Michael Potter, 89, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute whose research led to greater understanding of tumors and the immune system and who won the prestigious Lasker Award for medical research, died Tuesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He had acute myeloid leukemia, said his daughter, Melissa Adde Magrath. Dr. Potter worked for more than 50 years at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. He was a principal investigator in NCI's Laboratory of Cell Biology and, for more than 20 years, was chief of the Laboratory of Genetics.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Invoking the memory of a King of Prussia man, House Speaker Newt Gingrich yesterday vowed to vigorously support passage of a bill that would pay $900 million to HIV-infected hemophiliacs. "The federal government did not do the right thing," Gingrich told a news conference on the Capitol lawn, referring to a federal report that criticized regulation of the blood industry. "This bill is a matter of simple justice. " The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Fund Act would pay $125,000 to each of the estimated 10,000 hemophiliacs who, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, contracted the AIDS virus from commercial blood-clotting medicines.
NEWS
August 29, 2003 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Myra Bellin and her husband redid their family room, they chose a 50-inch plasma TV and hung it on the wall. The TV's flat profile made that appealing to the Society Hill couple. "It's my husband's baby," Bellin said, "but I'm enjoying it too. It's the clean lines, I think. . . . You don't have to have all that bulk behind the screen. " Most folks who come in for large, flat-panel TVs also plan to hang them up, said Tweeter's Paul Alexander, assistant manager at the Maple Shade store.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia college professor and board member of the National Hemophilia Foundation has filed a $153 million lawsuit against the NHF, a local pharmaceutical company, and several others, saying they are to blame for his infection with potentially deadly hepatitis C. It is believed to be the first such lawsuit brought by a national NHF board member. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, alleges that the NHF misled hemophiliacs by advocating the use of blood-clotting products while characterizing itself as an independent patient advocate.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ah, e-commerce, the thinking man's way to bring buyers and sellers together. But buyer beware. You might want to think again the next time someone on Craigslist or another service offers a snazzy laptop or a plasma TV for sale and instructs you to bring a large sum of cash to a remote part of the city. Chances are you will part company with your money under less than ideal circumstances. Like having to hand it over to a man waving a gun in your face. That's the bait-and-switch scam that Theodore Graham and Anthony Owens were running, said Philadelphia police, who yesterday announced the arrest of the two 16-year-olds for a string of robberies dating to Jan. 18. In that incident, a 45-year-old man responded to a Craigslist ad of a computer for sale.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each year, more than one million American women give a part of their bodies to make valuable vaccines used throughout the world. In return, they don't even get a thank you. But these women - all of whom have just given birth - might be surprised to learn that their "gifts" are part of a multimillion-dollar business involving hospitals, brokers and an international conglomerate based near Paris. The business: buying and selling placentas, the vital mass of tissues that nourishes the fetus during pregnancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Jon Takiff
ALONG WITH the Super Bowl and  World Series, the Olympics are a major motivator for sales of new TVs. And this week, some retailers are making the buying  easier — slashing set prices and throwing in extras. Gizmo Guy believes bigger is always better in a TV screen, so aim for the largest size you can fit in your space. And if the TV comes with 3D capability, so much the better. More than 200 hours of the Olympics will be carried in 3D by the likes of Comcast, DirecTV and Verizon FiOS.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 2025 Washington Ave., on a wide South Philly street lined with stone and pipe dealers, crews have spent the last two months laying concrete footings, installing heating, cooling, and ventilating equipment, soundproofing, wiring, winching, piping, and preparing to install computer-controlled plasma cutters, lathes, grinders, robotic painters, 3D printers, and other cutting-edge machines, for an inventors' dream workshop. Its owners hope it will revive Philadelphia manufacturing for digital times.
SPORTS
April 6, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Krzyzewski isn't interested in leaving Duke for the New Jersey Nets. Krzyzewski said through a spokesman that he hasn't been contacted by the Nets and "wouldn't have any interest in the job. " New Jersey's Bergen Record, citing anonymous sources, reported that incoming Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov would offer Krzyzewski $12 million to $15 million per season. Krzyzewski said in a statement yesterday that "you would be flattered if someone would offer you a job, but I would not be interested.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Advanced Plasma Solutions' AmpTech Makerspace, in a 20,000-square-foot former investment office at 31 General Warren Blvd. in the Great Valley, is the latest high-tech, do-it-yourself lab and business incubator to erupt in the Philadelphia area. Plasma is a fourth state of matter, different from solid, liquid, or gas, and often highly reactive. Plasmas are made in nature, for example, when lightning passes through air, or in factories, by pressuring a gas until its electrons fly loose.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Michael Potter, 89, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute whose research led to greater understanding of tumors and the immune system and who won the prestigious Lasker Award for medical research, died Tuesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He had acute myeloid leukemia, said his daughter, Melissa Adde Magrath. Dr. Potter worked for more than 50 years at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. He was a principal investigator in NCI's Laboratory of Cell Biology and, for more than 20 years, was chief of the Laboratory of Genetics.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 2025 Washington Ave., on a wide South Philly street lined with stone and pipe dealers, crews have spent the last two months laying concrete footings, installing heating, cooling, and ventilating equipment, soundproofing, wiring, winching, piping, and preparing to install computer-controlled plasma cutters, lathes, grinders, robotic painters, 3D printers, and other cutting-edge machines, for an inventors' dream workshop. Its owners hope it will revive Philadelphia manufacturing for digital times.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Jon Takiff
ALONG WITH the Super Bowl and  World Series, the Olympics are a major motivator for sales of new TVs. And this week, some retailers are making the buying  easier — slashing set prices and throwing in extras. Gizmo Guy believes bigger is always better in a TV screen, so aim for the largest size you can fit in your space. And if the TV comes with 3D capability, so much the better. More than 200 hours of the Olympics will be carried in 3D by the likes of Comcast, DirecTV and Verizon FiOS.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been only nine months since Drew Becher took over as president of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, succeeding Jane Pepper, who led the nonprofit for 25 years. But already he's stirring things up at the society's signature event: the Philadelphia International Flower Show, which opens Sunday and runs through March 13 at the Convention Center, at 12th and Arch Streets. "I think the show needs to be completely different," he says, "layout, marketing, posters, everything.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Healing wounds in moments. Treating wastewater without chlorine. Creating better TVs, cell phones, and computers. The growing science of plasma technology is key to them all, and it's coming soon to Camden. Drexel University's Plasma Institute, the country's largest research center on the ionized gas known as plasma, will move its laboratories to Camden's Waterfront Technology Center in the coming weeks. The move is the most recent in a series of expansions into the Garden State from Drexel's home in West Philadelphia.
SPORTS
April 6, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Krzyzewski isn't interested in leaving Duke for the New Jersey Nets. Krzyzewski said through a spokesman that he hasn't been contacted by the Nets and "wouldn't have any interest in the job. " New Jersey's Bergen Record, citing anonymous sources, reported that incoming Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov would offer Krzyzewski $12 million to $15 million per season. Krzyzewski said in a statement yesterday that "you would be flattered if someone would offer you a job, but I would not be interested.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2010 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"We've broken this slide. " - President Obama, on Friday's report that businesses added 162,000 jobs in March, though unemployment remained at 9.7 percent "They're not big numbers, but they're welcome numbers. " - Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group., on the jobs report "According to the indictment, this defendant helped himself to others' fortunes, living a life of luxury, with little or no regard for the damage to our financial markets, our economy, and the reputation of the investment advisers who follow the rules.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ah, e-commerce, the thinking man's way to bring buyers and sellers together. But buyer beware. You might want to think again the next time someone on Craigslist or another service offers a snazzy laptop or a plasma TV for sale and instructs you to bring a large sum of cash to a remote part of the city. Chances are you will part company with your money under less than ideal circumstances. Like having to hand it over to a man waving a gun in your face. That's the bait-and-switch scam that Theodore Graham and Anthony Owens were running, said Philadelphia police, who yesterday announced the arrest of the two 16-year-olds for a string of robberies dating to Jan. 18. In that incident, a 45-year-old man responded to a Craigslist ad of a computer for sale.
NEWS
August 10, 2009 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Jon Dorenbos was at a spring practice suffering from one of his bouts with long-snapper's elbow. The Philadelphia Eagles center, whose specialty is the long centering pass to punters and placekickers, often got severe discomfort in his left elbow from those repeated hard flicks in practice and in games. The technical term is medial epicondylitis, and while it can afflict almost anyone's funny bone, it can be excruciating for athletes who make their living doing such irregular motions.
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