CollectionsPlaster
IN THE NEWS

Plaster

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 1991 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a time when decorative plaster was as common as icing on a birthday cake. Yet, as drywall has replaced plaster as the chief material of a home's interior walls and ceilings, wood and plastic have replaced the plaster ceiling medallions and cornices that decorated the larger homes of 75 to 100 years ago. Only two dozen or so Philadelphia-area firms do flat plaster work on walls and ceilings. And just a handful reproduce decorative plaster. They range from companies such as Felber Studios of Ardmore, with more than a dozen employees and national connections, to sculptor Daniel F. Lowenstein of Philadelphia, a one-man operation specializing in reproducing damaged cornices.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | By Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
In the Now-We've-Heard-Everything Department, there's this from the West Coast: Dr. Stork's Original Pregnant Tummy Cast Kit. Now baby boomers expecting their boomlet don't have to wait till the kid is born and walking to get that traditional keepsake, the bronzed baby shoe. Now, they can get a memento while the kid is still in the womb: a plaster cast of Mommy's tummy. The do-it-yourself kit will soon be available in novelty stores, baby shops, and gift catalogs, for $19.95.
LIVING
April 15, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We have a large brick heat-vent stack in our small kitchen that takes up considerable space. Could I take off the plaster that covers the brick from floor to ceiling and expose the brick for architectural interest? I assume I'd need to have the brick pointed to contain the exhaust emissions, but could I do the plaster removal in a weekend? Answer: If your house was built before 1978, there might be asbestos behind or in the plaster. Take a small sample of the plaster and send it to a lab approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for testing.
SPORTS
December 2, 2011 | BY BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
Revenge is a dish best served cold.   MIGUEL COTTO is out for revenge against Antonio Margarito, but it seems his bitter feelings toward the man who beat him bloody on July 26, 2008, have not cooled to a point at which the WBO welterweight champion will try to settle an old, festering score dispassionately. His dislike of Margarito still runs hot, very hot. "I handled my defeat like a man," Cotto (36-2, 29 KOs) said of his 11th-round stoppage at the perhaps-loaded hands of Margarito (38-7, 27 KOs)
REAL_ESTATE
November 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My home was built in 1944, and even the new addition, a porch converted to a dining area about 20 years ago, has lath and plaster walls. Is there a way to insulate these walls? Also, would it be practical to reinstall oil heat? We now have a heat pump - we bought into the "it's not your old heat pump, it will save money over oil" sales spiel. Answer: It appears there are two very different questions here on the same topic - energy efficiency - and I'll try to answer each.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James J. O'Brien, 92, a self-employed plasterer whose work included homes as well as projects for a church and museum, died of heart failure Friday at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby. He lived in Wayne. Mr. O'Brien retired 20 years ago and remained at the home that he built, with the assistance of friends, in the mid-1940s. He completed the masonry and carpentry and helped with the plumbing and electrical work. He graduated from the former St. Katharine of Siena High School in Wayne in 1925 and eventually followed an uncle in plaster contract work.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Gallagher Sr., 67, a general contractor and an artisan of ornamental plaster, died Wednesday when he was struck by a SEPTA commuter train in Middletown Township, Bucks County. He was a resident of Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Gallagher, vice president of the Shannon Corp. in Cinnaminson, N.J., suffered a cortical stroke on Oct. 22 and was left blind, according to his daughter, Bernadette Liddell. She said he did not suffer from Alzheimer's disease, as had been reported by the coroner's office following his death.
NEWS
April 6, 2006 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bryn Mawr's antique white horse, the wood and plaster icon that had gone begging for a new paddock and master, has found both. The Bryn Mawr Beautification Foundation, a nonprofit civic group, will buy the rare saddle-maker's dummy and move it to the Bryn Mawr Film Institute at 824 W. Lancaster Ave. The $30,000 needed to purchase, restore and move the 19th-century artifact is being donated by the Philadelphia-based William B. Dietrich Foundation,...
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I read your December article about basement leakage. I, too, have a basement foundation of fieldstone. The house dates to 1835 or thereabouts. You mentioned that this basement construction made use of "Irish" plaster. Can this fieldstone wall be sealed with Drylok or some other masonry waterproofing treatment? Answer: A lot of people asked what "Irish" had to do with the style of construction, so let me explain that first. The "Irish" applies to the nation of origin of the masons, who devised a way to rid themselves of job-site debris and save on construction costs.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sculptor Lou Desmarais loves working with plaster. "I like the hardness, the resilience, the fact you can pound it, scrape it, sandpaper it," he said. "You can beat it up, and it gives you a nice texture. " Lifting a dust-covered cloth off his work in progress, he revealed the nicks and cuts, rough edges, and grooves in the white plaster form of a male torso. Nearly hidden in a corner of his Solebury studio, an award-winning piece - Aldo, Ex-Boxer, Age 103 - rested on a pedestal.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Security guards arrived at Camden City Hall before dawn Thursday to find bumper stickers plastered on doors calling for the removal of Mayor Dana L. Redd's chief of staff. "Novella Hinson must leave Camden City Hall," read the bright red stickers. Eight were on the doors of a side entrance and on a security booth in front of the building, police said. Hinson, who is unpaid and listed as an aide to Redd, has drawn criticism in recent weeks from some city residents for her alleged involvement in a City Council matter.
REAL_ESTATE
July 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I thought I'd finished with writing about knob and tube wiring - punch that phrase into the Philly.com search engine to read the articles - but readers raised a couple of good points this week, so I'll go one more time. Knob and tube is the earliest of the electrical wiring, basically designed to power lightbulbs between 1880 and 1930. Its presence in existing houses has become an issue for many lenders and home insurers, and it is serving to delay real estate transactions until after large amounts of money have been spent to replace the antiquated wiring.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph T. Hess, 66, of Cape May, former owner of a Philadelphia construction firm involved in plastering restoration work at the Academy of Music and the Union League, died of melanoma Saturday, May 30, at Cape Regional Medical Center in Cape May Court House. Born in Havertown, Mr. Hess graduated from Cardinal O'Hara High School in 1966 and earned a bachelor's degree in accounting at Villanova University in 1970, where he was a member of the Accounting Society, his wife of 41 years, Doriel, said.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA's efforts to block city bus ads proclaiming "Jew Hatred: It's in the Quran" violate free-speech protections and should be halted, a federal judge has found. In a case that grappled with basic First Amendment issues over disparaging advertising, District Judge Mitchell S. Goldberg ruled Wednesday that SEPTA had inconsistently run public-issue ads from other organizations, and cleared the way for a private group's ad that seeks to end U.S. aid to Islamic countries using a provocative headline and a photograph of Adolf Hitler meeting with an Arab leader.
REAL_ESTATE
November 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My home was built in 1944, and even the new addition, a porch converted to a dining area about 20 years ago, has lath and plaster walls. Is there a way to insulate these walls? Also, would it be practical to reinstall oil heat? We now have a heat pump - we bought into the "it's not your old heat pump, it will save money over oil" sales spiel. Answer: It appears there are two very different questions here on the same topic - energy efficiency - and I'll try to answer each.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-five years ago, when John Doherty was doing rehab work for Campus Apartments, removing old plasterwork to make way for drywall, he was struck by the beauty of the buildings' antique plaster flourishes - all destined for the landfill. Instead of throwing the pieces out, he began salvaging them to sell at a flea market on the weekends. Then he learned that he could make rubber molds of the intricate pieces and replicate them as many times as he wanted, for use in his own designs.
REAL_ESTATE
March 30, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion. I had a new roof put on my home 10 years ago. In the last couple of years, I have noticed, first on one and then another, and now all interior sides of exterior walls, paint peeling and plaster crumbling. This is happening only on the first and second floors. The third floor, right under the roof, is in fine shape. I want to stop whatever it is, a leak of some sort, I imagine, and fix the walls (the easy part, I'm sure) before the day comes when my house goes on the market (not imminent)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many people, a do-it-yourself renovation is merely the cheapest path toward a more beautiful place to live. But for Percy Bright and Tara Mangini, their house makeover became something more: It was a place to learn on the job, a showcase for their design sensibility, and ultimately, the launchpad for a new career. Today, Bright, 29, and Mangini, 30, run the boutique design-build firm Jersey Ice Cream Co. Back in 2009, though, Bright was a graphic designer - and when it came to buying a house, he wasn't even sure what he was looking for. When he came across the South Philadelphia rowhouse, it had "grandma-style" decor - not exactly the stuff of a dynamic interior-design portfolio.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Choreography begins with the circle. Choreography literally means "dance-writing" from the Greek words for "circular dance" and "writing. " For his new work, Occupant, choreographer Jonah Bokaer is researching the etymology of the word and using it to graphically call our attention to its origins. For the piece, artist Daniel Arsham has created 25 exact replicas of cameras in a plaster/chalk substance that will fill the 40-by-80-foot space of the seventh floor of the Fabric Workshop and Museum.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Since their spring appearance at Arcadia University - in which they showed huge poured-plaster reliefs, one gradually revealing the contours of Marilyn Monroe reading James Joyce and the other of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool - the artist duo Dechemia (John Gibbons and Isobel Sollenberger) has been exploring the concept of the end of time, not as the end of the world but as a metaphor for change. They've also been revisiting their earlier images, among them doorways, sacred geometry, and mirror reflections, as evidenced in their current show, "Outside of Time," at Rebekah Templeton Contemporary Art. The show's star and largest work, Milky Way , is a multipanel poured-plaster relief that measures 12 by 6 feet.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|