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Plastic Bags

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NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
It's BYOB at Murphy's Super-Rite on Sunday - that's bring your own bag. Members of the League of Women Voters of Medford, Medford Lakes and Evesham are bringing their own bags for a shopping expedition at the store to protest the use of plastic bags and commemorate Earth Day. "We want to draw attention to the use of the plastic bags, and we're hoping that we can stop the use of them," said Ethel Daum, a league member. "We are going to go with our own containers, like canvas tote bags or string bags.
NEWS
July 4, 2008 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS
When friends and neighbors heard the Brady family needed materials for a special craft project, plastic grocery bags magically starting appearing on their doorstep. Once they had more than 60 bags on hand, Michelle Brady and daughter Cecily went to work, recycling the bags into a hooked rug that has become quite the conversation piece. "People who've seen the rug seem to think it's cool," says Michelle Brady, 41. "One family friend decided to make her own. " Brady came across the idea on the Internet while researching creative ways to reuse Christmas cards.
NEWS
June 19, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly has bagged its bag ban. For now. City Council yesterday voted down a measure - two years in the making - that would have nixed carry-home plastic bags from major stores, allowing only paper, compostable plastic, and reusable bags. The 10-6 vote came after the environmental committee earlier this year withdrew a similar bill, which would have enacted a 25-cent fee on plastic bags. But the bill's supporters vowed that the battle of the bags is far from over and that they would work all the harder to, as Councilman James Kenney put it, "catch up with the world.
FOOD
July 10, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: To recycle the small plastic bags you use for fruits and vegetables at the grocery store, stuff them into a pop-up tissue box. Any time you need one, a bag is right at hand. Where you use celery to lend crispness, substitute the broccoli stems that you otherwise might throw away. Here's a quick way to ready eggs for scrambling. Break the eggs into a jar, add a little water or milk, salt and pepper, screw on a tight fitting lid and shake. So easy, even a child can do it. Salads will wilt less quickly on hot days if you chill the bowl and the utensils you plan to serve them with.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
My friend, visiting from Denmark, was horrified. We were in a small grocery, and the clerk had packed everything into a plastic sack. " Whaaat ?!" Jan scolded as we left. "Of all people! Don't you have your own bag?" I'd forgotten it. Lame, but it happens from time to time. Denmark has a bag fee, and it has transformed Jan's behavior. He walks everywhere; tucking a reusable bag into his briefcase is as automatic as pocketing his keys. Here in the United States, we're still wrestling with the issue.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Milk's got a brand new bag. Dairies, no longer cowed by the carton industry, have lately been pouring some of their milk into see-through plastic bags for use in schools. The clear plastic bags of milk are floppy, squishy, clammy and cold - about four inches square, and a half-inch thick when they're lying on the table. One high school student said kids think they look "like breast implants. " Several fifth-graders said their buddies ("no, not me - never") have occasionally tried them out as "squirt guns and milk grenades, once or twice . . . in the beginning.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consumers who just can't get behind reusing grocery bags may have sighed with relief last week when an effort to charge Philadelphia shoppers a nickel each for plastic bags couldn't even get a hearing before City Council. So for now, at least, single-use plastic bags remain free at Philadelphia cash registers. But that doesn't mean they are cost-free. Obviously, the bags cost merchants something, which is passed on to consumers. But depending on where discarded bags land, taxpayer-funded programs are often responsible for cleanup efforts.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - An area lawmaker wants Pennsylvania shoppers to BYOB (bring your own bag) or pay a fee. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery) has introduced a bill aimed at reducing the volume of plastic bags in the trash by imposing a two-cent fee on each new bag used by shoppers. One penny of the fee would go to state recycling programs, and the other would go to the retailer to help with its recycling. Leach said his bill - like those already enacted in Seattle, Los Angeles, and Washington - would encourage customers to shop with reusable bags while reducing landfill waste.
NEWS
January 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bar-code scanner beeps. The groceries glide toward the bagger, not to mention a new eco-enemy: the bag itself. If it's made of plastic, all the worse. Plastic bags are handy, to be sure. They carry lunches, wet swimsuits and pet waste. Yet they last for centuries in landfills. Thrown away, they are often blown away, urban tumbleweeds that wind up draped in trees, plastered to fences, clogged in sewer drains. In the open sea, they kill turtles. So the ubiquitous "free" plastic grocery bag - that small, pale piece of processed petrol so flimsy that good baggers double up - is beginning to be targeted by lawmakers and others who want them restricted or banned.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
At long last, people who care about the environment have something nice to say about those ubiquitous, fossil fuel-based, all-too-disposable plastic bags. Apparently, they make great eco-art. And great purses, placemats, floor mats, chair covers, you name it. Some years back, an ingenious soul -- no one is quite sure who -- figured out how to cut the bags into strips that could be fused into longer lengths or loops, which in turn could be linked the same way as a string of rubber bands.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consumers who just can't get behind reusing grocery bags may have sighed with relief last week when an effort to charge Philadelphia shoppers a nickel each for plastic bags couldn't even get a hearing before City Council. So for now, at least, single-use plastic bags remain free at Philadelphia cash registers. But that doesn't mean they are cost-free. Obviously, the bags cost merchants something, which is passed on to consumers. But depending on where discarded bags land, taxpayer-funded programs are often responsible for cleanup efforts.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council has tried to ban them and tax them, but plastic bags have continued to flutter out of Philadelphia's reach. Now one member of Council is targeting them anew - with a bill to impose a five-cent fee on all shopping bags, paper and plastic. "People go into convenience stores and come out with a bag that they really didn't need and toss it onto the streets," said Councilman Mark Squilla, who introduced the bill Thursday. About a dozen states and scores of municipalities - including Washington, Chicago, and San Francisco - have passed laws to regulate plastic bags.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
HOW MUCH WOULD you pay for the plastic and paper bags used by grocery stores and other retailers? A penny? Maybe for your thoughts, but City Councilman Mark Squilla thinks you should pay five cents for each bag. A bill he introduced yesterday calls for the tax as a way to discourage littering while helping to fund the city's anti-littering campaign. Two cents from each nickel collected would go to the city and could generate as much as $150,000 a month, said Squilla, a Democrat who represents the 1st District, which includes parts of South Philadelphia, Center City and Port Richmond.
REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Three readers have come to the rescue of our neighborhood, which has been dodging the slings and arrows of an outrageous robin on the make since the cold weather began easing up a bit. Maybe not slings and arrows, but enough birdie poop to leave our cars looking rather yucky. We, of course, realize the robin is looking for love, but our cars qualify as all the wrong places. Readers Eleanor Yodis, Jerry Christie, and Karen Giordano merit gratitude for their suggestions. From Christie: "As someone abused over several years by a robin, and the subject of family jokes and humor, I have found the solution to the robin sitting on my mirrors and leaving deposits this time of year.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Center City man who was going to nursing school while working as a pimp pleaded guilty Thursday to third-degree murder in the 2013 death and dismemberment of a john he had set up to be robbed. With five jurors selected for his trial in Common Pleas Court and two prostitutes prepared to testify against him, Keith "King" Tolbert decided to take a plea deal that will put him in prison for 22 to 44 years. Tolbert, 35, will be sentenced Friday by Judge J. Scott O'Keefe. His attorney, Mary T. Maran, said Tolbert wants to express his remorse to the family of Francis Zarzycki, 40, and tell authorities where he dumped the victim's missing body parts.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plastic bags, bike-sharing programs, and Philadelphia City Council powers have not been big issues thus far in this year's mayoral race, but Tuesday night, they offered unexpected opportunities for candidates to stand apart. Those opportunities, along with some rather quirky personal questions, enlivened a mayoral forum at the Convention Center held by the Next Great City Coalition, a broad collection of unions, community groups, businesses, churches, and nonprofits. The forum drew candidates Lynne M. Abraham, Nelson Diaz, the Rev. Keith Goodman, James F. Kenney, Doug Oliver, and State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - An area lawmaker wants Pennsylvania shoppers to BYOB (bring your own bag) or pay a fee. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery) has introduced a bill aimed at reducing the volume of plastic bags in the trash by imposing a two-cent fee on each new bag used by shoppers. One penny of the fee would go to state recycling programs, and the other would go to the retailer to help with its recycling. Leach said his bill - like those already enacted in Seattle, Los Angeles, and Washington - would encourage customers to shop with reusable bags while reducing landfill waste.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Artist Ruth Miller was going to give Leslie Kelly - homeless for 14 years and who still sees herself as a likeness to Botticelli's Birth of Venus - an early birthday present. The plan was to meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday at a coffee shop at Fourth and Gaskill, where Kelly likes to read. But it was pouring rain. So Miller called Kelly on her cellphone - yes, she has a phone - and they agreed to meet at Kelly's current residence, under the canopy at Headhouse Square. Kelly went over to Xochitl, a Mexican restaurant, grabbed a cardboard box from the trash, and folded it nicely as a seat for her guest.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - On a radio show they hosted called "The Pursuit of Happiness," John Littig and Lynne Rosen urged listeners to embrace spontaneity. "So much about life is about impulse," Littig said on a broadcast this year on an FM station in New York, WBAI. "It's about doing it right now. " A shocking decision the couple made together appeared more methodical: Police say they killed themselves side by side as part of a suicide pact. Autopsies found that both Littig, 47, and Rosen, 45, died from asphyxiation after inhaling helium, a spokeswoman for medical examiner's office said yesterday.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | BY SAM DONNELLON
THE 1996 ATLANTA Olympic Park bombing. The World Trade Center massacre. The London subway bombing. The stabbing death of a U.S. citizen during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Newtown. Three dead and, at last count, more than 140 injured in Monday's bombing at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. That's our world. These are timelines my three children will use to mark their ascent into adulthood, just as the deaths of JFK, RFK and MLK, and the attempted assassinations of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan marked mine.
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