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Plastic Bags

NEWS
January 19, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
The first time Mable E. Welborn and her daughter attended a Martin Luther King Jr. event was the 1963 March on Washington - and Desiree Wayne was not quite 2 months old. "My daughter was born in July and on Aug. 28, I took her with me to the march," said Welborn, now chair of the board of the Leon H. Sullivan Charitable Trust Foundation. Mother and daughter were again together yesterday, this time at Girard College in North Philadelphia for the 15th Annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council, in a busy session yesterday, approved a new trash fee for businesses, required periodic exterior building inspections for large buildings, and set new environmental standards for city buildings. Council's new commercial trash fee of $150 met little opposition because it represented a reduction of the $500 fee enacted in the spring as part of the 2010 budget. That fee was supposed to go into effect July 1, but objections from the sticker-shocked business community forced Council to reconsider.
NEWS
June 19, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly has bagged its bag ban. For now. City Council yesterday voted down a measure - two years in the making - that would have nixed carry-home plastic bags from major stores, allowing only paper, compostable plastic, and reusable bags. The 10-6 vote came after the environmental committee earlier this year withdrew a similar bill, which would have enacted a 25-cent fee on plastic bags. But the bill's supporters vowed that the battle of the bags is far from over and that they would work all the harder to, as Councilman James Kenney put it, "catch up with the world.
NEWS
May 7, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plastic retail bags may soon be a thing of the past - or at least, a costly luxury - in Philadelphia. Under a contentious measure being brought before City Council today, shoppers would be charged 25 cents for every plastic bag they receive at any store. Businesses with more than $1 million in annual sales would give 75 percent of the fees to the city; smaller stores could keep the fees. If the measure passes - which appears likely - Philadelphia would join a growing number of cities enacting bans or fees to reduce plastic bag use, both to address environmental concerns and reduce litter.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
AS WE GET into the swing of the cleaning season, it amazes many people how much trash accumulates on the streets. According to Keep America Beautiful, on average each person creates about five pounds of trash daily. In a city of 1.4 million, that's a lot of waste. A large contributor is the use of so many disposable products. It often starts with packaging: the coffee cup, the sandwich bag we package our children's lunch in, the plastic bag at a store, the water bottle. These items didn't exist in such abundance 30 years ago. Keep Philadelphia Beautiful is starting a campaign aimed at creating greater awareness of waste-reduction strategies through reducing, reusing and recycling waste.
NEWS
February 6, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid talk of cable contracts and plastic-bag bans at City Council's meeting yesterday, Councilmen Frank DiCicco and Jim Kenney slipped in a whopper - a $20 million tax on oil refineries. DiCicco and Kenney introduced a bill that would institute a 35-cent tax on every barrel of petroleum processed in the city, which they said would likely raise $20 million. "Oil companies saw huge profits in 2008 and the City of Philadelphia continues to struggle to meet service demands," DiCicco said in a news release.
NEWS
December 29, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
It's easy to mock all the eco how-to books that the publishing industry churns out, never mind the number of trees consumed in their printing.     Saving the planet is a project for the long haul, and it will be anything but easy. It will require significant technological advances, government action and international cooperation.   But we peons can act immediately. The things we do may be incremental. But we're such a wasteful society that the steps we can take are as easy as turning out the lights.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Lynne Ratliff
Grocery bags - whether to use plastic or paper or have customers bring their own bags - have been a hot topic at Philadelphia supermarkets lately. Whole Foods, Trader Joe's and Super Fresh recently changed their policies, and rebate customers who bring their own bags. The assumption is that plastic bags are always bad. I prefer plastic; I have some good reasons (see below). So I investigated this issue further. Were stores asking more environmental responsibility of their customers than the stores themselves were willing to undertake?
NEWS
July 4, 2008 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS
When friends and neighbors heard the Brady family needed materials for a special craft project, plastic grocery bags magically starting appearing on their doorstep. Once they had more than 60 bags on hand, Michelle Brady and daughter Cecily went to work, recycling the bags into a hooked rug that has become quite the conversation piece. "People who've seen the rug seem to think it's cool," says Michelle Brady, 41. "One family friend decided to make her own. " Brady came across the idea on the Internet while researching creative ways to reuse Christmas cards.
NEWS
February 4, 2008
Do good and feel good: Bring your own bags The millions of plastic bags we use in Philadelphia take expensive and polluting energy to produce and are wreaking havoc on the environment ("Time to Bag It?," Jan. 28). It is easy to bring your own bag, and you feel so good doing it! As little as it is, I feel I am doing something; I am contributing to the cleanup effort, not adding to the mess. I just wish it would catch on. There are some days I feel like standing at the end of grocery store registers and asking customers if they'd ever thought of bringing their own bags.
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