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Plastic Bottles

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NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
Hot enough out there? Bet you're thirsty.   Once you choose what you want to drink, there's another big decision: What are you going to drink it from? The container — and I'm not talking about the reusable water bottle you always carry — is a major part of your beverage footprint. (Would that be your "drinkprint?") The good news is that companies are responding to greener consumers and are making huge sustainability strides. Just by drinking in 2012 instead of 1982, you're already to the good.
SPORTS
December 20, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In a reaction to fan violence in two NFL cities last weekend, all plastic bottles will be taken out of the hands of fans at Giants Stadium and the Georgia Dome this Sunday. In St. Louis, beer will be poured for fans, although bottled water still will be sold. Stadium officials made the moves this week after watching rowdy fans in Cleveland and New Orleans disrupt games by tossing bottles onto the field to protest officials' calls. Saints. New Orleans wide receiver Albert Connell was suspended by the team for allegedly stealing money from teammate Deuce McAllister, according to several news reports.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
West Chester residents will be asked to save their plastic soda and milk bottles as the borough begins a plastics-recycling program. The borough joined two private firms in a one-year pilot program to collect, process and market plastic materials. Lt. Gov. Mark Singel announced the arrangement Monday at a news conference in Borough Hall. The borough will begin collecting the bottles at its public-works building on Lacey Street within two weeks. Plans call for collection bins in each of the borough's seven wards within a couple of months.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is nothing sacred? Now, they've put beer in plastic bottles. In time for St. Paddy's Day, no less. But whether people like it may depend on how - or rather, how much - they intend to celebrate. "We think St. Patrick's Day presents a great opportunity for people to see for themselves why the plastic bottles make sense," said Scott Bussen, spokesman for the Miller Brewing Co. in Milwaukee, which began nationwide distribution last week of 16- and 20-ounce bottles of Miller Lite, Miller Genuine Draft and Icehouse beer.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
The Delaware River shoreline is a bit cleaner after volunteers spent hours Saturday clearing out tires, cans, auto parts and other debris. Benjamin Pucay, 17, a Rutgers University freshman, did his part by helping carry out bags filled mostly with plastic bottles.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Sworaski has lost count of the salesmen who have trooped through the Camden County recycling office in recent months, begging to buy the county's plastic bottles. "They're coming in and saying, 'Give us all the milk jugs you can give us,' or, 'Give us all the soda bottles you can give us,' " said Sworaski, the county's recycling coordinator. Trouble is, only a handful of towns now collect plastic bottles in their recycling programs. And yet plastic recyclers are clamoring for the material, most of which is sent to landfills.
NEWS
August 29, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water bottles, water bottles everywhere - and SEPTA doesn't know what to think. Just 24 hours after the discovery Monday night of 30 plastic bottles placed at exits inside the tunnels of the Broad Street subway line, an additional 32 bottles were discovered. SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said the bottles found Tuesday night had again been placed near emergency hatches and atop emergency light fixtures located between stations. Maloney stressed that the mysterious plastic bottles - soda and juice containers filled with varying amounts of water - presented no danger.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., which has been clawing its way back from the brink of financial disaster, reported further progress yesterday. The Philadelphia maker of food and beverage cans, plastic bottles, and bottle caps said it had enough money to make a $40 million debt payment in December and a $195 million payment due in April. The company also said during its third-quarter-earnings conference call that it had spent $78 million to settle asbestos-related claims so far this year and that it expected those costs to be $100 million to $110 million for the year - as projected.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
A Nike missile silo in Lumberton, once capable of launching warheads into the heavens, may soon be launching bales of compacted plastic trash to Edison, N.J. Lumberton Township's recycling director, Doris Priest, is spearheading a plan to convert one of six deactivated missile silos at the corner of Municipal Drive and Landing Street into a site for baling used plastic bottles. "The silos were made for World War III and they are very intact," said Joe Bender, director of the nonprofit Occupational Training Center, which collects recyclable material in 39 of 40 Burlington County municipalities.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The cola wars moved to new turf yesterday as Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola both announced plans to sell their beverages in recycled plastic containers. The two soda makers, which made their announcements within 30 minutes of each other, touted their moves as breakthroughs that ultimately would permit the recycling of plastic, as is done with glass and metal now. The cola makers became the latest to join the corporate race to please an increasingly environmentally conscious public.
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NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
A howling gray morning saw the raging waters of Hereford Inlet bursting at it seams in North Wildwood. The inlet, which sits between North Wildwood and Stone Harbor, was rushing through rock walls, bringing piles of dead sea grass, plastic bottles and other debris far up onto lawns. North Wildwood Mayor Bill Henfey said the morning high tide brought major flooding to back bay areas along Maryland and Delaware avenues and the tide wasn't following normal patterns. "It just keeps coming," Henfey said.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
By Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic Where have all the copy boys, blacksmiths, and elevator operators gone? We could ask the same of coopers, the artisans who crafted wooden barrels back in the days before plastic bottles - when households needed churns, casks, and hogsheads to hold liquids. The word milliner might ring a bell with some hat-wearing church ladies. But, really, when was the last time you bought a custom-made, hand-fitted hat? Jobs must change with the times.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
Hot enough out there? Bet you're thirsty.   Once you choose what you want to drink, there's another big decision: What are you going to drink it from? The container — and I'm not talking about the reusable water bottle you always carry — is a major part of your beverage footprint. (Would that be your "drinkprint?") The good news is that companies are responding to greener consumers and are making huge sustainability strides. Just by drinking in 2012 instead of 1982, you're already to the good.
NEWS
April 2, 2011
Here's a look at some of the worst offenders that clog city streets with trash: Household trash: Phoebe Coles of Keep Philadelphia Beautiful says we're our own worst enemy: Untied or torn trash bags, trash cans stuffed with loose litter or trash set out too soon make the biggest mess. Cigarette butts: Millions of peoples still smoke and fewer cars have ashtrays, so . . . The solution is to quit smoking, but Coles said the city and private businesses need to install more cigarette receptacles.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
Plastic bottles, logs and other debris - but no rescue boats - bobbed in the Delaware River yesterday after the Coast Guard called off the search for a newborn reported thrown from the Ben Franklin Bridge. Although authorities are still searching for the woman who claimed that she had thrown the newborn, and possibly two more children, the Coast Guard said that it had found no evidence during eight hours on the water and in the air that the incident had happened. Jason Laughlin, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, said that authorities believe that the woman exists and will try to find her. It was too early to say if she could be charged if her reports were false, he said.
NEWS
April 22, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2003, an investor offered 21-year-old Princeton dropout Tom Szaky a million bucks. Szaky turned him down. Not that he didn't need the money. He was sleeping in a makeshift office, showering in the gym, and pondering a cash balance of zero. The guy wanted Szaky to lose the environmental pitch with his business plan, except that was the plan. Today, Szaky is glad he didn't give in. Szaky has become a titan of trash. His company, TerraCycle, transforms waste headed for the landfill into new products.
NEWS
December 15, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1982 vintage of Lafite-Rothschild is among the most storied wines of the last few decades. To the serious collector, it is worth several thousand dollars a bottle, Robert J. Levis explained to his listeners. Unless, of course, something goes wrong with the cork, and the precious fluid turns to vinegar. But how to tell without popping the cork? The question was a hypothetical one - and not just because Levis didn't have a bottle of the fine bordeaux on hand. Most of his audience wouldn't be allowed to drink it anyway.
FOOD
July 17, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
For a moment, just a year, maybe two ago, it seemed that a tipping point had been reached: Bottled water wasn't cool anymore; it was uncool. The plastic bottles had taken on the aspect of handheld SUVs - oil hogs to manufacture, to haul (from Fiji, for Pete's sake!), to get rid of. They weren't vessels of glacial purity; they were agents of glaciers' demise. More than that, the soda companies - Coke and Pepsi, who'd seen soft-drink sales soften - had implicitly demonized perfectly safe public tap water that they were then shamed into admitting (in city after city, including Philadelphia)
NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By John Kelso
The great comedian Jonathan Winters once said, "Don't touch that groundhog, Junior. You don't know where it's been. " That's the way I feel about bottled water. How can you really tell where it came from? I was at a title company last week when the gal at the front desk brought us plastic bottles of water with the name of the title company printed on front. Sure, having the name of your business on the water bottle makes for a swell advertising gimmick. But are we supposed to believe that because the title company has its name on the bottle that it has its own burbling spring out behind the high-rise?
BUSINESS
December 31, 2005 | By Frank Greve INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola, a California vintner by avocation, is making Americans an offer he hopes they won't refuse: He's asking them to drink his champagne out of cans. The new bubbly - named Sofia, after Coppola's moviemaking daughter - comes in individual servings of about six ounces. It's offered in a demure raspberry-color, plastic-lined can with a straw attached to the side, just like Juicy Juice. It sells for $5 a pop - or $20 for a four-pack, which comes packaged in a hexagonal foil carton, also raspberry in color, with circles like champagne bubbles cut out of its sides.
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