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Plastic Surgeons

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NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Randall, 91, of Chestnut Hill, an innovator in the field of cleft palate surgery who brought his skills to patients in Philadelphia and abroad, died Sunday, Nov. 16, of a stroke at Foulkeways at Gwynedd, where he had lived for 15 years. Dr. Randall was chairman of the department of plastic surgery at both the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. According to a history of Penn's plastic surgery program, the field developed because of the need to treat soldiers suffering from battlefield wounds and burns in the wake of the two world wars.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Dr. Charles E. Pappas was decked out in black rather than his usual surgical green as he greeted colleagues and patients at his new office in Fort Washington. Instead of his usual relaxing, classical-music tapes, Pappas had a string quartet playing background music in his waiting room. A full bar was set up in the hallway and waiters in tuxedos offered patients hors d'oeuvres on silver trays. The occasion was the grand opening Friday night of The Institute of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and it was obvious from the start that this wasn't just another ribbon-cutting ceremony.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It is a story that might have sprung full-blown from the deep well of conspiracy fantasies. All the princes of darkness were there at the beginning of the saga of silicone. Racism. Sexism. Imperialism. Even the military- industrial complex. Silicone made its entry into the female body almost 50 years ago, because Japanese women were trying to attract American soldiers. The conquerors liked bigger breasts and so industrial strength transformer coolant was injected directly into these women.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
You wake up each morning and make your way into the bathroom, shutting the door behind you. While brushing your teeth, you stare at yourself in the mirror. Ugh - that schnoz! If only it were a little smaller. Or a little larger. Or a little straighter. You spit out the toothpaste and inspect your face more closely, grimacing this way and that to smooth out the wrinkles that have developed since - when? It wasn't that long ago you were a taut-faced 18-year-old. However, this daily makeover need no longer be done in the solitude of your bathroom, and the results need no longer be locked in your imagination, as a result of a computer software program called the "Imager.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has agreed to pay the U.S. government $412,474 to settles claims stemming from two fraud schemes by a hospital department chairman and a trio of plastic surgeons that netted more than $4.5 million. Dr. Joseph J. Kubacki, former Chairman of Temple's Ophthalmology Department, was convicted in August on 73 counts of health care fraud, 73 counts of making false statements, and four counts of wire fraud. Kubacki, also a professor at the medical school and an attending physician at Temple University Hospital, billed federal agencies more than $1.5 million claiming he had performed services at the hospital performed by residents when he wasn't there.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Fat suctioning, America's favorite form of cosmetic surgery, is so safe and effective that the fight against flabby bodies has reached a level "unheard of in medicine," a leading Philadelphia cosmetic surgeon said today. The American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons said in a report released today that it had documented 11 deaths and nine non-fatal cases of serious complications in an analysis of 100,000 U.S. liposuction procedures over five years. The procedure involves inserting a tubular instrument under the skin and suctioning off fat tissue.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Which cosmetic surgeries do women want most after childbirth? Which cosmetic procedure is the most popular with men between 30 and 60? How have face-lifts changed over the last 40 years? When Daniel C. Baker, one of the country's most renowned plastic surgeons, graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1968, he never could have dreamed that 43 years later he would be cochairing, with plastic surgeons Sherrell J. Aston and Thomas D. Rees, a symposium that included sessions on vaginal rejuvenation and reshaping the buttocks Italian, Brazilian, French, or Swedish style.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
David Sarwer, of Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, an authority on mental health issues in cosmetic surgery, offers a course at the annual convention of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and has drawn up lists of three questions physicians should ask of patients requesting cosmetic surgery and three questions the patients should ask themselves. For the physician Can the plastic surgeon really see the defect?   Does the patient report impaired daily function based on his or her appearance?
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
USED TO BE, a woman who wanted to spice up her love life would buy a sex toy, learn a new lovemaking technique or invite more than one partner into her bed. But in this age of extremes, some women are taking a more radical route to please their paramour: They're having their vaginas sliced and diced. "Vaginal rejuvenation" surgeries give women a chance to tighten private parts pulverized by childbirth, or to just correct those that Mother Nature made assymetrical or imperfect, supporters of the surgeries say. "Because of the recession, most cosmetic surgeons are doing far less [business]
NEWS
October 8, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No body part is off-limits anymore as some in beauty-crazed America chase a new look: sculpted genitals and bold J.Lo butts. These novel, and increasingly popular, cosmetic procedures will undoubtedly be talked about when the 5,000-member American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) arrives in Philadelphia today for its annual meeting. But the bigger buzz at the Pennsylvania Convention Center likely will revolve around three fast-growing, less titillating developments: Botox for younger patients looking to prevent creases later on. New wrinkle-filling injections that last longer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eyes. Lips. Nose. Chin. Cheeks. Neck. Breasts. Abdomen. Hips. The inventory of imperfect body parts that bother women and lead them to undergo cosmetic plastic surgery was already extensive. It has now reached bottom. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, during the last few years, demand for cosmetic labiaplasty, a trimming of the female genitalia, has increased dramatically. In 2005, this is how many labiaplasties Adrian Lo, a prominent Philadelphia plastic surgeon, performed: Zero.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Black Madam" Padge-Victoria Windslowe conceded that her specialty - buttocks enlargement using injected silicone - was illegal and even dangerous in the wrong hands. Her hands were the right ones, Windslowe, 43, boasted. She was "the best, the Michelangelo of buttocks injections. " Windslowe's boast is debatable. A Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury found her guilty Monday of third-degree murder and aggravated assault in the death of one client and the hospitalization of another.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Randall, 91, of Chestnut Hill, an innovator in the field of cleft palate surgery who brought his skills to patients in Philadelphia and abroad, died Sunday, Nov. 16, of a stroke at Foulkeways at Gwynedd, where he had lived for 15 years. Dr. Randall was chairman of the department of plastic surgery at both the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. According to a history of Penn's plastic surgery program, the field developed because of the need to treat soldiers suffering from battlefield wounds and burns in the wake of the two world wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
She'll have a chemical peel while he has some Botox injections. New idea for a date night? Sort of. In this hectic world where the hours in a day slip quickly away, couples look for activities to spend quality time together. Apparently, even the business of nipping-and-tucking can be done as a duo. Although the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery do not compile data on such events, local doctors say "couples cosmetics" is becoming an expanding trend.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Donato D. LaRossa, 72, of Radnor and later Malvern, a plastic surgeon in Philadelphia, died Tuesday, Jan. 21, of cancer at his home. Dr. LaRossa specialized in surgery to repair cleft lip and palate defects, as well as reconstructive surgery and aesthetic improvements to the breast, face, and ear. He also operated on melanoma patients. He was a professor of surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1991 until 2009, when he was named professor emeritus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Katy Perry's prayers Do you pray? The teenage Katy Perry sure did   . Her sincerest heaven-bound supplications concerned her anatomy. "I lay on my back one night and looked down at my feet, and I prayed to God," Perry, 29, tells GQ. "I said, 'God, will you please let me have boobs so big that I can't see my feet when I'm lying down?' " Someone listened: Perry's bust is an object of admiration around the globe. So much so, young women often ask plastic surgeons to give 'em Perry breasts.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Informed care ABC News correspondent Amy Robach's recent courageous decision to undergo mastectomy and breast reconstruction highlights an important shift in our national dialogue on breast cancer. In addition to screening and prevention, we are now experiencing much-needed discussion about healing and survival, with the empowerment of women from diagnosis to recovery at the heart of this conversation. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons emphasizes that breast cancer care includes, at minimum, a surgeon, oncologist, plastic surgeon, radiologist, and gynecologist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She's one of the transgender community's most passionate advocates. Yet New Hope plastic surgeon Christine McGinn has an equally intense suspicion of the news media even as she relies on them to get her message heard. "There is so much ignorance out there about transgendered people," says McGinn, one of half a dozen transgender men and women profiled in Trans, a documentary screening Sunday as part of Philadelphia QFest and one of an unusually large crop of transgender films at the annual lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender film festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Elizabeth Wellington
You bought red short shorts in April, confident this would be the summer of the tight tush. But here it is July 4th and your bum is still too bootylicious. Or maybe that trendy midriff tank doesn't look quite right because your tummy is too tubby. And then there is that high-cut bikini. Whew! One extra french fry and even a perfect bod can test that two-piece. Sometimes you can use fashion to camouflage imperfections — an A-line skirt for pear-shapes or illusion sleeves for saggy arms.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION Temple settles with U.S. government Temple University agreed to pay the U.S. government $412,474 to settle claims stemming from two fraud schemes by a hospital department chairman and three plastic surgeons that netted more than $4.5 million. Joseph J. Kubacki, former chairman of Temple's Ophthalmology Department, was convicted in August on 73 counts of health-care fraud, 73 counts of making false statements, and four counts of wire fraud. Kubacki, also a professor at the medical school and an attending physician at Temple University Hospital, billed U.S. agencies more than $1.5 million, claiming that he had performed services at the hospital that were done by residents when he wasn't there.
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