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Plastics Industry

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BUSINESS
May 1, 1992 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
K-Tron International Inc., the Pitman manufacturer of blenders and feeders, said yesterday that it had acquired about 95 percent of the stock of Colortronic GmbH, a German systems-engineering company, for $10 million. K-Tron also said it had paid off $3 million in debt that Colortronic owed to a shareholder and had assumed $12.2 million of existing debt. Ronald G. Larson, K-Tron's senior vice president and chief financial officer, said Colortronic, based in Friedrichsdorf, represented K-Tron's fourth European acquisition since the 1970s and was "by far the largest.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | By Joyce Lain Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Dear Joyce: As a chemical engineer, I'm interested in knowing more about careers in plastics. Dustin Hoffman's graduate didn't enter the plastics field but thousands of engineers and entrepreneurs did; many found their career choice a satisfying and enriching one. Others lost their jobs or shirts as overseas competition with cheaper labor costs overtook them. High oil prices in the early '70s caused even more job-market problems. The picture began to change markedly in 1984 with stepped-up hiring of chemical engineers, Ph.D.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind a case of plastic-wrapped meats, next to a rack of polyethylene soda bottles, grocer Don Hansen reached down and shoveled German potato salad into a plastic pint container. "You look around," he said, scowling. "If it's made of plastic, it's going to be gone. " That's a lot of items. Under the city ordinance passed here this month, Hansen eventually could be barred from selling not only his plastic-wrapped meats, soda and potato salad, but also his nonbreakable plastic jars of peanut butter, his squeezable plastic bottles of ketchup - the list is longer than the aisles in Hansen's downtown market.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The cola wars moved to new turf yesterday as Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola both announced plans to sell their beverages in recycled plastic containers. The two soda makers, which made their announcements within 30 minutes of each other, touted their moves as breakthroughs that ultimately would permit the recycling of plastic, as is done with glass and metal now. The cola makers became the latest to join the corporate race to please an increasingly environmentally conscious public.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Way back in 1757, when the H.M.S. Rose was launched, its sails were of canvas. They propelled this majestic ship through skirmishes in the English Channel and then across the Atlantic. Later, the Rose chased smuggling colonists off Rhode Island and, in 1776, joined an attack on New York. Today's Rose is propelled by sails that are something else. They're trash. Just about every other detail on what is billed as the largest wooden tall ship afloat has been diligently, faithfully, authentically replicated.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Two Camden County municipalities have been selected to take part in a pilot program for recycling plastics conducted by the Center for Plastics Recycling Research at Rutgers University. Clementon Borough and Berlin Township are expected to begin the recycling program by the end of the month under the plan that is being channeled through the Camden County Solid Waste Administration. The program, expected to last six months, is the first in the country that includes the curbside collection of plastics but does not require residents to separate plastics from other recyclable materials.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
With countywide plastics recycling at least five years away, Mount Laurel and Moorestown this fall will expand their current voluntary program by packaging and selling the recycled materials themselves. The two Burlington County communities will split the cost of $17,410 worth of equipment, including a baling machine, a shed and trash bins, that will allow them to sell their recycled plastic directly to a manufacturer. The two communities now pay Wheaton Plastics $185 a month to collect the plastics, which are stored in a trailer at the Mount Laurel municipal complex, said Chris Martin, Mount Laurel's deputy manager.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Seattle officials ban plastic bags SEATTLE - The Seattle City Council voted Monday to ban single-use plastic bags from groceries and other retail stores, joining a growing trend among cities that embrace green values. The ordinance, approved unanimously after months of discussion and debate, takes effect in July. It includes a provision to charge a nickel fee for the use of paper bags, to encourage people to bring their own bags when they shop. The ban is expected to reduce pollution, free up landfill space, and improve the environment.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you think it's bad that the whole country is in a lather over the stalemate between Vice President Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush, imagine that sort of tension in your own household. Or at your workplace. Or whenever you get together with your friends. Which, of course, is what's happening everywhere as the recounts drag on with no clear winner: The political is becoming personal. "I voted for Bush, and my girlfriend voted for Gore," said Donnie Wisnu, 22, a senior business major at New York University who could be found yesterday at the Xando coffeehouse on 36th Street, near the Penn campus.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | By NEAL R. PEIRCE
"A plastic foam beverage container to keep a cup of coffee warm five minutes is likely to last millennia," warns Portland Commissioner Earl Blumenauer. "Increasingly we see polystyrene foam littering roadsides and shorelines and crowding our landfills. This stuff is cheap; it's light; it's forever. " Blumenauer is hardly alone in taking up the fight against disposal of nonbiodegradable plastics into municipal landfills. From New York to Los Angeles, several dozen local officials have made plastics control a top item on their agendas.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Gov. Tom Corbett wants Pennsylvania to promise a 5-cent-a-gallon tax credit for Shell Chemical L.P. and other manufacturers using Pennsylvania ethane, a Marcellus Shale drilling-zone product the governor says could be the base for a new plastics industry. Steve Kratz, spokesman for Corbett's Department of Community and Economic Development, which gives out business subsidies and tax breaks when it's not forcing cash-strapped city governments to pay their bondholders, called Monday to explain the thinking behind the idea, after Capitolwire.com columnist Peter L. DeCoursey posted an account of a "secretive" ethane-tax proposal in Corbett's budget.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With all his talk about sugar cane, corn, casaba, and fungi, Jeff White sounded like someone with a food obsession. But the ingredients he enumerated during an interview last week had to do with manufacturing, not a meal. His is an unconventional view of the world, where vegetables and other crops are the base materials for such durable goods as cellphone covers, DVD trays, and shipping containers. But the success of Ecospan L.L.C., the bioplastics company he now leads that aims to replace petroleum-based plastics with those made from natural resources, depends on White's perspective becoming widely held by consumers.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Seattle officials ban plastic bags SEATTLE - The Seattle City Council voted Monday to ban single-use plastic bags from groceries and other retail stores, joining a growing trend among cities that embrace green values. The ordinance, approved unanimously after months of discussion and debate, takes effect in July. It includes a provision to charge a nickel fee for the use of paper bags, to encourage people to bring their own bags when they shop. The ban is expected to reduce pollution, free up landfill space, and improve the environment.
NEWS
June 19, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly has bagged its bag ban. For now. City Council yesterday voted down a measure - two years in the making - that would have nixed carry-home plastic bags from major stores, allowing only paper, compostable plastic, and reusable bags. The 10-6 vote came after the environmental committee earlier this year withdrew a similar bill, which would have enacted a 25-cent fee on plastic bags. But the bill's supporters vowed that the battle of the bags is far from over and that they would work all the harder to, as Councilman James Kenney put it, "catch up with the world.
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you think it's bad that the whole country is in a lather over the stalemate between Vice President Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush, imagine that sort of tension in your own household. Or at your workplace. Or whenever you get together with your friends. Which, of course, is what's happening everywhere as the recounts drag on with no clear winner: The political is becoming personal. "I voted for Bush, and my girlfriend voted for Gore," said Donnie Wisnu, 22, a senior business major at New York University who could be found yesterday at the Xando coffeehouse on 36th Street, near the Penn campus.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Way back in 1757, when the H.M.S. Rose was launched, its sails were of canvas. They propelled this majestic ship through skirmishes in the English Channel and then across the Atlantic. Later, the Rose chased smuggling colonists off Rhode Island and, in 1776, joined an attack on New York. Today's Rose is propelled by sails that are something else. They're trash. Just about every other detail on what is billed as the largest wooden tall ship afloat has been diligently, faithfully, authentically replicated.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1992 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
K-Tron International Inc., the Pitman manufacturer of blenders and feeders, said yesterday that it had acquired about 95 percent of the stock of Colortronic GmbH, a German systems-engineering company, for $10 million. K-Tron also said it had paid off $3 million in debt that Colortronic owed to a shareholder and had assumed $12.2 million of existing debt. Ronald G. Larson, K-Tron's senior vice president and chief financial officer, said Colortronic, based in Friedrichsdorf, represented K-Tron's fourth European acquisition since the 1970s and was "by far the largest.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
With countywide plastics recycling at least five years away, Mount Laurel and Moorestown this fall will expand their current voluntary program by packaging and selling the recycled materials themselves. The two Burlington County communities will split the cost of $17,410 worth of equipment, including a baling machine, a shed and trash bins, that will allow them to sell their recycled plastic directly to a manufacturer. The two communities now pay Wheaton Plastics $185 a month to collect the plastics, which are stored in a trailer at the Mount Laurel municipal complex, said Chris Martin, Mount Laurel's deputy manager.
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